Eagles Highlight of the Game: Kurt Coleman's Resourcefulness

Eagles Highlight of the Game: Kurt Coleman's Resourcefulness

You gotta hand it to Kurt Coleman, there's seldom a dull moment in the Eagles' secondary with the third-year safety. Number 42 has already been in on some of the most memorable plays of this short season -- good and bad -- but it's equipment issues he's quickly becoming famous for.

First he had his helmet trucked off by Cleveland's Trent Richardson in Week 1. On Sunday, Coleman took out his aggressions on Antonio Brown's shoe.

Late in the second quarter, the Steelers were driving as the clock worked against them. On 3rd and 4 from inside Birds territory, Ben Roethlisbeger connected with Brown, who had shaken Nnamdi Asomugha on a quick inside move. Coleman tracked down the ball carrier after a gain of 18, hauling him to the turf with a shoestring tackle -- quite literally.

So much so that when Coleman stood up, he was still in possession of Brown's shoe. Rather than hand it back to the opponent or simply drop it though, Coleman chucked that hunk of leather to the sideline. DN's Les Bowen asked him about it after the game.

“I didn’t want it,” Coleman said, when asked to explain. “I’m not going
to hold onto it and hand it to him. He’s going to have to go get it.”

In the grand scheme, it meant nothing. Brown's Pittsburgh teammates wound up racing up to the line of scrimmage to spike the ball, and eventually settled for three. However, had they been trying to run a play there, the offense essentially would have been without the receiver. Under any other set of circumstances, Brown would have been forced to come off for at least a play.

And besides being an example of his win-at-all-costs mentality, it was also pretty funny. Unfortunately Coleman couldn't come up with a game-winning interception on Pittsburgh's final drive as he did the day he was nearly decapitated in Cleveland.

Hat tip Larry Brown Sports for the video find.

Joel Embiid practices fully but doubtful for Friday and Saturday

Joel Embiid practices fully but doubtful for Friday and Saturday

Joel Embiid was a full participant Wednesday during the Sixers' first practice back from the All-Star break, but he's listed as doubtful for their games Friday and Saturday.

The Sixers host the Wizards Friday night (7/CSN) and face the Knicks Saturday night at Madison Square Garden (7:30/CSN).

If Embiid misses both games it would be 13 in a row and 16 of 17.

Still, it's a good sign he was able to practice in full Wednesday.

Ben Simmons, meanwhile, has a CT scan scheduled for Thursday in New York. The appointment should show whether his foot has healed enough for him to take the next step in his rehab.

Simmons did individual work at Wednesday's practice.

CSN Philly's Jessica Camerato contributed to this report.

Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

Sarah Baicker: I don't skate like a man, just a darn good woman

In late December, I was invited to play in a pick-up hockey game with some other members of the local sports media community. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that I was one of only two women there that day. Even now, female ice hockey players aren’t exactly common.

After the game, a reporter I’ve known a while — a guy I like a lot — said to me: “Don’t take this the wrong way, but you skate like a man.” I didn’t take it wrong, of course; he meant it as a compliment. The reporter wanted nothing more than to tell me I’d impressed him.

I thought about this exchange a lot in the days that followed. Had someone told me I played hockey like a boy when I was 15, I would have worn that description like a badge. Hell yeah, 15-year-old Sarah would have thought, I do play like a boy. I’m as tough as a boy. I’m as fierce and competitive as any boy on my team. I would have reveled in it, just as I reveled in a similar label I’d received even earlier in my adolescence: tomboy.

Yeah, I was a tomboy. I hung around with the neighborhood boys, riding bikes between each other’s houses or catching salamanders in the creek that ran through town. I loved sports, and my bedroom walls — papered with newspaper clippings and photos of Flyers players — were a far cry from the pink-tinged rooms that belonged to the girls at school. 

As much as I could, I dressed like a boy too, even once cutting the sleeves off of an oversized T-shirt before I went out to rollerblade with our next-door neighbors. My grandmother, who was visiting at the time, pulled me aside to tell me I really ought to dress more appropriately. I rolled my eyes.

I was a tomboy, and I loved the word and everything it stood for. I felt pride in my tomboyishness, believing that the things I liked — the things boys liked — were clearly better than the things stereotypically left to the girls.

I’m almost embarrassed to admit it was a conversation with a 15-year-old that changed my perspective, just a few days after my reporter friend had compared my hockey skills to those of a man. I sat down with Mo’ne Davis, the female Little League pitching phenom, for this very project. I asked her if she identified as a tomboy, and she shrugged. Not really, she said. Maybe other people wanted to define her that way, she suggested, but that wasn’t how she viewed things.

You know that record scratch sound effect they play on TV or in the movies? The one that denotes a sort of “wait … what?!” moment? That’s what happened in my head. Mo’ne Davis, the girl who played on the boys’ team and excelled, didn’t consider herself a tomboy?

Something clicked in my head after that. I’ve long identified as a feminist, and I’ve been a big supporter of girls in sports for as long as I can remember. I coach girls hockey, I’ve spoken at schools and camps about playing and working in sports as a woman. For some reason, though, it took a 15-year-old shrugging her shoulders at the label “tomboy” to take the power out of the word for me. Why does one have to be a tomboy, when one can simply be a girl who kicks ass? How had I never considered this before?

In many ways (and especially in sports) if something is male, it’s considered superior. It goes beyond just the things kids like to do, and it’s all old news. It’s also something I’m ashamed to admit I’ve bought into for practically all of my life. But no longer. How can I help change the narrative if I’m too busy playing along with it?

And if I could do it over, when that reporter approached me after our hockey game to tell me I skated like a man, I would have smiled, shook my head and said: Nah. But I skate like a darn good woman.