Eagles Non-highlight of the Game: Icing the Kicker

Eagles Non-highlight of the Game: Icing the Kicker

You probably jumped out of your seat when Lawrence Tynes missed his 54-yard field goal to the left, as did the 69,000 fans at the Linc on Sunday night, only to have Andy Reid pull the rug right out from in under you, too. There was no 54-yard field goal attempt. That fleeting moment of jubilation may have suddenly turned to panic as you realized what had transpired.

The head coach did one of those things head coaches do that nobody else understands. He iced the kicker.

The Eagles were fortunate Tynes missed from 54 yards again, for real this time, no take backs, sealing a hard-fought 19-17 victory over the Giants. I can only imagine the thrashing Reid would be taking today had the place kicker nailed the second try, as we've seen so often on highlights in the past. Then SportsCenter flips to a shot of anonymous imbecile coach trying to be all like, "I knew what I was doing," but is completely incapable of pulling off any expression except self-loathing.

Reid didn't have his I'm-a-dummy-in-front-of-a-national-TV-audience moment this time, therefore the moment will largely go forgotten outside of before and during future Eagles-Giants tilts. But why? Why forget? There is a lesson to be learned from this. It's not just Reid, either. This is a call to every NFL head coach who currently is not reading.

Don't ice the kicker in this situation.

What is even the alleged benefit to icing the kicker? You're going to rattle his tiny kicker confidence?

I say you're only giving him time. Time for the special teamers to trot out to the field. Time for him to eye up his target. Time to set up. Time to judge the conditions. And if coach calls the timeout right as the ball is being snapped, an opportunity to go through the motions and actually practice the kick.

Think about it. These coaches are letting professionals have a warm-up try. All they do is kick a football for a living. Wouldn't more tries make it more likely the kicker is going to correct any mechanical errors, now knowing exactly what he needs to do in order to boot that little piggy through the uprights?

You head coaches are going about this all wrong. The Giants had no timeouts. Make them run out there and kick it on the fly. It seems to me something is more likely to go wrong when everybody is out there cold, rushing around while the play clock is ticking down, threatening to transform a difficult field goal attempt into an impossible one.

Heck, I'll even allow for icing the kicker if the other team used their own timeout to set it up. Give him more time to think about it, but don't wait until the last possible moment right before they're going to kick the ball! Do they let Kobe Bryant take a practice free throw before he shoots two for the win? Of course not, how utterly ridiculous would that be?

Andy Reid got away with it on Sunday, but I haven't heard too many people admit they are a fan of this tactic, a long and distinguished list that included Michael Vick immediately after the game. Even your own players don't want to ice the opposing team's kicker, coach. Why does every last one of you insist on doing it?

Philadelphia Union announce 2017 broadcast schedule

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Philadelphia Union announce 2017 broadcast schedule

CHESTER, Pa. (Feb. 21, 2017) – Philadelphia Union today announced their 2017 Major League Soccer broadcast schedule, with all 34 of the club’s matches available live, on local and national television. A total of four matches will be featured on local broadcast television via 6abc, with 20 matches on The Comcast Network (TCN) and five on Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia (CSN). The Union are also slated to be on national television five times in 2017, appearing on ESPN four times and FS1 once.

Union supporters can catch the club on 6abc in four marquee fixtures: Saturday, April 22 vs. Montreal; Saturday, June 24 vs. D.C. United; Sunday, October 15 at Chicago; and Sunday, October 22 vs. Orlando on MLS Decision Day.

Additionally, the club will be on national television for the following games: Friday, April 14 vs. New York City FC (ESPN); Sunday, June 18 vs. New York Red Bulls (ESPN); Sunday, July 2 vs. New England (FS1); Sunday, September 17 at New York Red Bulls (ESPN); and Sunday, October 1 vs. the defending MLS Cup champion Seattle Sounders FC (ESPN).

See below for a full summary of the Union’s 2017 MLS regular-season schedule, including all broadcast information:

Philadelphia begins the 2017 campaign by playing at Vancouver Whitecaps FC on Sunday, March 5 (TCN / 9:30 p.m. ET) before returning to Talen Energy Stadium for the 2017 home opener on Saturday, March 11 against Toronto FC (CSN / 4:30 p.m. ET). In addition to Season Tickets, fans can now purchase Partial Plans and Group Tickets for all Philadelphia Union matches at Talen Energy Stadium.  For the first time, the Union will be offering a Fully Flex 9 Game Plan where fans can select their games along with a Tiered Flex 5 Game plan. Fans can purchase or find out more info by visiting PhiladelphiaUnion.com/tickets or calling 1-877-21-UNION.

DeSean Jackson is playing the Eagles against the NFL

DeSean Jackson is playing the Eagles against the NFL

The Eagles sure could use a wide receiver, and DeSean Jackson is a free agent. Jackson even said it himself in an interview that ran on Tuesday: a reunion with the Eagles would be a good story.

Or perhaps a story that's almost too good to be true.

Don't get me wrong, Jackson could very well wind up back in an Eagles uniform once everything is said and done. He can become a free agent in March. There's an obvious need at wide receiver. Jackson never wanted to leave Philadelphia in the first place, and the person responsible for that — Chip Kelly — is long gone. It makes perfect sense.

So much sense, Jackson can use what is considered common knowledge around the NFL for leverage in contract negotiations with 31 other teams.

Jackson is a smart, calculating guy, especially when it comes to business. He doesn't even have to say he wants to play for the Eagles for people to presume the interest is there, and more to the point, he hasn't.

When a bunch of Philly reporters pressed Jackson about his impending free agency in October, he said there were no hard feelings with the Eagles. When confronted again in December, the three-time Pro Bowler responded that you never know what can happen. On Tuesday, Jackson flat out admitted he's thought about a potential return — while describing talk of it as "a lot of speculation."

There are reports the Eagles will pursue Jackson should he hit the market on March 9. The 30-year-old speedster will be happy to field their call.

Along with the rest of the calls he'll get from around the league.

Unlike the Eagles, Jackson has come right out and said he wants to remain in Washington, and as recently as two weeks ago. Whether the interest is mutual on the Redskins' part remains to be seen, particularly at Jackson's contract demands, but that's a lot stronger than any suggestion he's made to the contrary.

Another report emerged on Tuesday that indicates the Buccaneers are a potential landing spot for Jackson as well, citing a pre-existing rapport with quarterback Jameis Winston. In other words, at the very least, there are more teams competing for his services.

Philadelphia, Washington, Tampa Bay, the West Coast, wherever — this is ultimately going to come down to which one can or is willing to make the most attractive offer.

That might be strike one against the Eagles already. They don't have a great deal of room to maneuver under the salary cap as of now, and while additional money could become available, signing Jackson for around $10 million per year or more would be a strain no matter what.

Keep in mind, Jackson is simply answering the questions he's asked about the Eagles. He's not running around from one media outlet to the other trying to create a market there. And in all honesty, his answers have been lukewarm at best, essentially amounting to, Sure, I'll listen if the Eagles call. Why not?

In the meantime, that puts the rest of the NFL on notice. The Eagles can be very competitive in free agency when they choose to be, and if they really want Jackson — and there are people in high-ranking places that probably wouldn't mind that — they will be players. Even if the Eagles have no serious intention of chasing Jackson, the perception is out there.

Jackson certainly understands that, and he hasn't had to put much effort into keeping the fire burning. He's more or less let the flames fan themselves.

Ultimately, Jackson to the Eagles isn't the least bit unlikely. Yet the idea that he's going to show the club any more deference than another doesn't seem quite as plausible when his comments, this entire situation are placed under the microscope.

Words are cheap. Signing Jackson, on the other hand, will not be. Not for the Eagles. Not for anybody. Not while he's expertly pitting his suitors against one another in the DeSean Jackson Sweepstakes.

The winner isn't going to be based on sentimental favorite or nostalgia. It's who's going to make the best deal for Jackson.