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Eagles Opposition Report: 49ers Offense

Eagles Opposition Report: 49ers Offense

Through three weeks, the San Francisco 49ers offense ranks dead last in the NFL in total yardage, averaging just 213.7 despite not playing a particularly tough slate of defenses so far (Seattle, Dallas, and Cincinnati). They're neither running nor passing well, ranking very close to the bottom of the league in both categories. The Niners have picked up only 209 yards on the ground and 432 through the air.

Here's a look at their key skill position players on offense, and click here for a look at the Frisco defense.

QB Alex Smith
Each year lately, we wonder why the 49ers don't get in on the offseason QB shuffle. Their division is usually up for grabs and poorly contended, and they've had a good running game and a solid defense. And yet, they were barely on the radar when the Eagles were shopping Kevin Kolb and Donovan McNabb before him, instead settling on a former first overall pick who wasn't good enough to get them over the hump in previous seasons and started only 10 games in 2010. Smith now has some in-house competition after the team selected Colin Kaepernick out of Nevada with the 36th overall pick, but the veteran held off the rookie to keep his starting job. Week 3 was pretty indicative of Smith's ability to impact an NFL game most weeks—200 yards, 0 TD, 0 INT. If he follows in Eli Manning's footsteps and beats the Eagles to the tune of an NFC Offensive Player of the Week, we're in huge, huge trouble.

ESPN's Mike Sando put together a nice piece on how Smith has fared against various types of pass rushes so far this season, as well as a look at his game against the Eagles in 2010, which may not have much bearing on what he'll see this Sunday. Here's why. Still, even with all of the above considered, Smith did manage a 300-yard game with 3 TDs against the Eagles last year.

RB Frank Gore
San Fran's top running back is listed as questionable this week, which isn't all that unfamiliar for him. Heading into the season, most thought it was more a question of when than if he would get hurt. His current ankle injury isn't expected to keep him completely out of action on Sunday, though it's not for certain it will matter either way. Gore has been largely ineffective so far this season even before getting nicked up last week, in large part due to his line's inability to open up holes for him. Gore can still churn out yards when healthy and in the right situation, but this week we'll more than likely see a good bit of the guy below. [UPDATE: Gore will play, but Kendall Hunter will start.]

RB Kendall Hunter
Hunter, a fourth round pick out of Oklahoma State, ran effectively enough in relief of Gore last week in Cincinnati. While a sub-3.0 YPC is nothing to get too excited over, Hunter did find the end zone on one of his nine carries. He also caught a pair of passes for 12 yards. He's no giant at 5'7, but he's stout enough at 200 lbs, and he has what it takes to test the Eagles' shaky run defense. In all likelihood, Hunter will get more carries than Gore, and given Gore's ankle, that's not necessarily a good thing for the Birds. Hunter is one of the 49ers' two most dangerous weapons this week.

Anthony Dixon should also get some carries and grab a few yards.

FBs Moran Norris and Bruce Miller
Fullback Moran Norris is expected to miss the game as well, leaving rookie Bruce Miller as the lead blocker out of the backfield. Rotoworld says Miller got the bulk of the first-team snaps in camp and could actually be an upgrade to Norris.

TE Vernon Davis
We all know the Eagles have trouble neutralizing tight ends, and this guy can be as dangerous as any in the league. The Niners had trouble getting Davis going in the first two weeks, hitting him with only 7 passes for 65 total yards and no scores. However, he hauled in 8 catches for 114 yards last week, leading the team in receiving. Expect San Fran to try to replicate that success against the Eagles. In last season's matchup between the two teams, Davis had one of his two 100-yard games of 2010 and also hauled in a TD. He's a big target at 6-3, 250, athletic, and a matchup problem for even some of the better linebackers and safeties in the league. Davis is the most dangerous man on the field for Frisco, and Juan Castillo will have to be creative if he wants to keep him from torching a group he generally outclasses, perhaps rolling one of his corners inside.

Establishing the pass rush early will be key too. If Davis needs to stay home and block, he's obviously a lot less dangerous. Also watch for TE2 Delanie Walker, who could sneak a catch or two from under the radar.

WR Braylon Edwards
Out with a torn meniscus, probably for a few weeks. An already poor receiving corps and passing attack gets even worse.

WR Josh Morgan
Morgan shouldn't be a coverage problem for the Eagles, but then again, neither should have Victor Cruz. Of course, Morgan won't have the benefit of lining up opposite Hakeem Nicks. He hasn't had more than three catches in any of his three games this year, nor topped 35 yards.

WR Michael Crabtree
Crabtree is listed as probable for this week, limited in practice this week by a foot injury. Like Morgan, he's done nothing of note so far in 2011. The foot kept him out of action in week 2, and he has only 4 catches for 28 yards a pair of games. John Hansen of FantasyGuru.com points out that Crabtree did have a nice TD negated by an offensive penalty, so he was close to breaking through last week.

WR/KR Ted Ginn Jr
Not a factor as a receiver through 3 weeks. Just 4 catches for 38 yards, all coming in week 2 with Crabtree out of action. However, he has already returned two kicks for touchdowns, taking a kickoff the full length in week 1 and returning a punt 55 yards for paydirt in the same game. Alex Henery better be aiming between the uprights every time he lines up, and Chas Henry should be thinking sideline when possible. Alex Smith did like him in week 2, targeting him a team-high 7 times.  

K David Akers
This guy's gonna get some applause, as well deserved as any returning player in Eagles history. But dear god let him not be lining up for a potential game winner in the final minute of the fourth quarter.

Photo by Jason O. Watson-US Presswire

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

Rating 5 changes the NHL made to its rulebook

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Rating 5 changes the NHL made to its rulebook

If you have witnessed preseason hockey this past week, you are well aware that the NHL is buckling down on its rulebook and even revising it. An excess of penalties and power plays have occurred as a result of these changes. Are they good for the game? I examine each of the five new rules or changes to the existing rulebook. 

Rule 78.7 (b) — A coach's challenge on an offside play — If the result of the challenge is that the play was “on-side,” the goal shall count and the team that issued the challenge shall be assessed a minor penalty for delaying the game.

In 2015, the NHL granted each coach a challenge they could utilize in the event of overturning an incorrect call on the ice. If the challenge failed and the original call stood, then the challenging coach would forfeit the team’s timeout. Starting this season, a failed challenge on an on-sides call in which there’s a goal will result in a two-minute minor penalty.   

By doing so, the NHL instituted a method to help maintain the game’s integrity in the event of a missed call by a linesman, as many coaches hold onto their challenge at a critical juncture — typically during the third period. Now with a two-minute penalty, it’s a way of reversing course without actually taking away the challenge. It's as if the league is saying we want you to have a challenge, but not really. The league is now discouraging teams from using it. As we’ve seen over the past few years, offsides calls can be measured in millimeters — that’s how arbitrary it’s become. But to penalize an entire team for a coaching staff’s misjudgment is excessive, and as we’ll see this season, it will sway the outcomes of a few games. Forfeiting a timeout for losing a challenge is acceptable, but killing a two-minute power play? Absurd, and for that I give it …

Two thumbs down   

Rule 61.1 — Slashing — Any forceful or powerful chop with the stick on an opponent’s body, the opponent’s stick, or on or near the opponent’s hands that, in the judgement of the referee is not an attempt to play the puck, shall be penalized as slashing.

Flyers fans can call out Sidney Crosby for emphasizing this rule, which is not a rule change but simply the enforcement of an existing rule. Crosby violated this in the worst way when he performed a machete slice over the hands of Senators defenseman Mark Methot late in the season. The result was a broken finger, nearly severed from the tip, and the loss of one of Ottawa’s top defensemen for weeks. Watch the video and you can hear Methot scream in pain as Crosby took his whack.

In the preseason, we have seen more slashing than department store prices during Black Friday. It’s out of control, not the slashing itself, but the slashing calls. As the rule states, it’s a "forceful or powerful chop" which usually requires a two-handed grip. However, the referees have resorted to blowing the whistle for a one-handed love tap. As Shayne Gostisbehere said Wednesday, “When they blow the whistle and everyone’s like, ‘What just happened?’ That’s not a penalty.”  

I suspect come October when the regular season begins, the officials will ease up on their slashing calls, but it definitely creates a gray area, much like the interference call. Over the course of the season, some refs will whistle everything, while others will let stuff go. If it protects the league from injury, especially serious injury in cases like Methot and even Johnny Gaudreau, it can be beneficial, but I see some inconsistency from game-to-game and for that I give it ...

One thumb up ... my good, non-slashed thumb

Rule 76.4 — Faceoff positioning and procedure — The players taking part shall take their position so that they will stand squarely facing their opponent’s end of the rink and clear of the ice markings (where applicable).

Like the slashing penalty previously discussed, this is another enforcement of an existing rule. In other words, the league wants to cut down on cheating during faceoffs. You know when players began cheating on faceoffs? Since the inception of the faceoff. In fact, I can recall producing a three-minute story when I was working at a Nashville TV station on how players gain advantages and bend the rules on faceoffs. Three minutes. On cheating! 

Now, those L-shaped lines are no longer suggestions or recommendations, but strict guidelines of where the players should stand prior to a faceoff. If a team is caught twice during the same faceoff (and it doesn’t have to be the same player), the result is a two-minute minor penalty. The Islanders' Josh Ho-Sang was a guilty offender twice during Wednesday’s game in Allentown and the Flyers benefited with a power play in each instance. The league’s explanation states they want to protect players from banging heads, and more importantly, protect the linesman dropping the puck. 

Like the slashing penalty, I’m curious to see which linesmen strictly enforce this rule and which ones will be a little more lax. This is another one of those penalties (like the challenge call) that you certainly don’t want to impact the outcome of a game. The league has good intentions for enforcing Rule 76.4, but will they have consistent enforcement? And for that I give it …

One thumb up

Rule 87.1 — No timeout shall be granted to the defensive team following an icing.

Once again, here’s another example of a moment when a coach would intervene during a critical point of a hockey game (usually late during the third period). An attacking team is applying pressure in the offensive zone of a close game and the defensive team, obviously gassed, flips the puck out of the zone for an icing. That coach proceeds to call a timeout to allow his team to catch its breath and grab some water before the ensuing faceoff.

My take on the new rule: Love it! This rule should have been implemented years ago. You can penalize a team for icing without actually calling a penalty. Allowing a timeout does exactly the opposite and circumvents any drawbacks of icing. By forcing a tired group of guys to line up and take a faceoff right away is precisely the way it should be handled, and for that I give this new rule …

Two thumbs up

Eliminating Rule 80.4 — Numerical advantage on faceoffs — When a team on the power play high sticks the puck, the ensuing faceoff will be conducted at one of the two faceoff spots in their defending zone.

This is the abridged version of the rule that was roughly half a page long. Playing the puck with a high stick is instinctual and when the game is played at warp speed, a player’s natural inclination is to raise their stick in an attempt to knock the puck out of the air. When a player is guilty of a high stick, the whistle is blown and a faceoff occurs. Now that this rule has been eliminated entirely from the rulebook, the ensuing faceoff will take place in the zone in which the infraction was committed.

No team should be given territorial advantage as a result of a high stick. I’m surprised it’s taken this long to acknowledge the absurdity of Rule 80.4, and for finally acknowledging this, I give the elimination of this rule …

Two thumbs up