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Eagles Opposition Report: Bills Defense

Eagles Opposition Report: Bills Defense

If you like shootouts, Sunday's contest between the Birds and the Bills could be the game for you. By any measure, Buffalo's defense is near the bottom in the NFL, most notably surrendering the sixth highest number of yards in the league. They don't do anything particularly great, so in theory, the Eagles should be able to score some points.

LDE Marcell Dareus
Not so fast though. The Bills finally operate out of a 3-4 after a failed attempt to convert to the system last season, and Dareus is the primary reason why they were able to make the move this time. The third overall pick out of Alabama, Dareus gives the defense another big body that can control the line of scrimmage, which they needed desperately. At 6-3, 340, he already commands double teams from the offensive line, and he can play either end or nose. Needless to say, Danny Watkins will have his hands full in his first career start.

NT Kyle Williams
Dareus joins the disruptive Williams, who essentially held the interior of Buffalo's front together on his own. A Pro Bowler in each of the past two seasons, Williams is an adept run defender who puts up silly tackle numbers for a lineman. The sixth-year veteran will utilize his ability to penetrate and occasionally pressure opposing quarterbacks as well, last season racking up a career best 5.5 sacks. We've noticed Jason Kelce has been getting blown off the ball in some key short yardage situations, and while Williams has only average size for a nose tackle (6-1, 301), he could easily give the rookie center fits this week.

ILB Nick Barnett
Barnett is an active linebacker who is more than capable of cleaning up whatever scraps are left over after Dareus and Williams are finished. He spent the previous eight seasons in Green Bay, but couldn't finish two of the last three because of injury, and found himself out of a job. He's still got some years left in the tank, but isn't a big time playmaker the offense will have to game plan around.

ROLB Shawne Merriman
The Eagles will catch a slight break on Sunday, as Chris Kelsay will miss the game with a calf injury, leaving Merriman as the Bills' only proven pass rusher. Of course, proven would only be an apt term if this were 2007, the last time Merriman showed any evidence of being able to get after the passer himself.

Injuries have worn down the man once known as "Lights Out." After exploding on to the scene with 39.5 sacks in his first three seasons with the Chargers, he has just five in the last four seasons, playing in only 22 games. Even when he's healthy, the burst that made him such a dangerous player coming off the edge is gone, and it's never coming back. Merriman might pull some wily veteran tricks out of the bag to beat King Dunlap a few times, as he will be starting in place of the injured Jason Peters, but at this stage, whoever is out there should be able to contain number 53.

CB Leodis McKelvin
Selected 11th overall in 2008, McKelvin hasn't developed into the shutdown corner Buffalo had hoped. To be fair, his second season was derailed by a broken bone in his leg, and he may have been spent last season trying to get back up to speed, but a pair of interceptions in 2010 is not the productivity they were searching for. McKelvin is still a threat to take one to the house when he gets his hands on the ball, but he's not going to eliminate one side of the field or anything like that.

CB Drayton Florence
Florence is a crafty veteran who just sticks wherever he goes. A second round pick of the Chargers in '03, Sunday will mark his 85th start over a nine-year career. He already has two picks on the season, so even though he'll be 31 in December, the offense has to respect his talent.

FS Jairus Byrd
It's hard to say what the Bills have with Byrd, as you would have a difficult time finding a much more uneven start to a career. As a rookie in '09, Byrd intercepted nine passes and earned an invite to Honolulu. Last season, he picked just one in what Football Outsiders described as a "miserable sophomore campaign." The truth is the huge total he posted as a first-year player was in part fueled by some lucky breaks, and he's not likely to sniff that number again. His coverage abilities undoubtedly will be tested by DeSean Jackson several times in this contest, so we'll soon see for ourselves if Byrd is the real deal, or if he is merely that one statistic.

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

A closer look at Nick Williams' surprising, impressive rookie season

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A closer look at Nick Williams' surprising, impressive rookie season

With less than two weeks to go before baseball season ends, now's a good time to begin looking back at the most surprising developments, stats and trends for the Phillies in 2017.

In no particular order, we'll run these throughout the fall, starting today with Nick Williams' success against left-handed pitching.

• • •

Williams has had an impressive rookie season overall but his success against same-handed pitching has been the biggest surprise in Year 1.

In the upper minor leagues in 2015 and 2016, Williams hit .223 with a .583 OPS.

As a major-leaguer, Williams has hit .282 against lefties with a .775 OPS, a double, two triples and two homers.

Makes me think back to a conversation with Williams in the summer of 2016, when things started to click for him vs. lefties.

"I've been seeing lefties a lot better lately," Williams said then. "A lot of them kind of do the same thing to me and that helps. I just want to master, really figure out what I'm trying to do and what they're trying to do to me. I didn't like when [managers] thought I couldn't hit a lefty and they would call a guy in from the bullpen just to pitch to me. It bothered me, I didn't like that, them thinking it could just take a lefty to get me out. I worked on it, worked on it, and I got better at it.

"Breaking balls away, sometimes they try to come in, but usually if they throw me a breaking ball that's a strike, it's a good pitch to hit. There's a couple times you can tip your hat to them for hitting a certain spot, but really, when lefties throw me a breaking ball for a strike, it's a good pitch to hit. Just staying patient and the one that's an inch off, two inches off, just bite your lip and take."

Williams won't place high in NL Rookie of the Year voting because it's been an impressive class with Cody Bellinger (the lock), Rhys Hoskins, Paul DeJong, Josh Bell and Kyle Freeland. (I think the Padres' Dinelson Lamet will be the third-best player among that group next year.) In other years, he'd be more of a top-five consideration.

Consistency over 300 PAs

Williams' strong summer has been overshadowed by Hoskins-mania but his production has been consistent.

Through 298 plate appearances with the Phillies, Williams has hit .287/.339/.478 with 14 doubles, four triples, 10 homers and 48 RBIs. 

Project that over 162 games and you get 32 doubles, 9 triples, 23 homers and 109 RBIs.

That doesn't mean that if Williams plays 162 next season he'll absolutely hit all of those marks but it's an idea of what a full, healthy season from him might look like.

"Nick Williams looks like the Phillies' rightfielder of the next six years" couldn't have been said with nearly as much certitude just six months ago.

Still think the Phillies waited too long?

I'd argue this is more indicative of the Phils' front office moving Williams along the right way.

They wanted him to show more plate selection before bringing up to the majors and he obliged, walking 8 times in his final 13 games at Triple after walking 8 times in his previous 65 games.

(Since this is the internet and at least a few will be inclined to label me a Phillies apologist for those previous two paragraphs, I do think they waited at least two months too long with Hoskins, maybe more.)

Williams just turned 24 on Sept. 8. He celebrated with a three-run homer off of Max Scherzer and a 4-for-5 night at Nationals Park. 

He's shown power to all fields, and though he's never been much of a base stealer, his speed stands out.

Finding a decent comp

So Williams has hit .287/.339/.478 in his first 300 plate appearances. 

Before this season, Justin Upton hit .268/.347/.472 over a decade (wow, does time fly).

Pretty similar, right?

Back to that 162-game projection for Williams of 32 doubles, 9 triples, 23 homers and 109 RBIs.

From 2007-16, Upton averaged 32 doubles, 5 triples, 27 homers and 86 RBIs per 162 games.

Williams' 300 plate appearances are far, far different from Upton's 6,000. But if Williams can start hot next season and remain consistent throughout 2018, a left-handed hitting Justin Upton with a skill set to bat second through sixth ain't bad.

So, is this sustainable?

Williams has a .376 batting average on balls in play. The league average is .300, so some will be quick to holler out that Williams will regress.

But keep in mind that just because the league average BABIP is .300 doesn't mean all players end up there. From 2014-17 in the minors, William's batting average on balls in play fell in the .355 to .365 range.

And this season, there are 33 players with a BABIP of at least .350. So it's not necessarily a major fluke that Williams has hit the way he has to this point. 

When putting the ball in play, fast players like Williams get on base more often than those with average speed. Williams already has 10 infield hits.

Next April and May are going to be really important for Williams. He'll start facing pitchers for the second, third and fourth times, and the rest of the league will have a better idea of how to get him out. These early returns are promising, though.