Asomugha tops list of Eagles who could be cut

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Asomugha tops list of Eagles who could be cut

They have about a million decisions to make. None bigger than what to do with Nnamdi Asomugha.
 
As the offseason heats up with the Combine this week in Indianapolis, free agency a few weeks away and the draft in two months, the Eagles must determine if Asomugha, the one-time dazzling All-Pro corner with the Raiders, is salvageable.
 
Asomugha was inconsistent in 2011 in his first year with the Eagles but downright awful this past season.

He’s due $15 million in base salary in 2013, and if the Eagles release him, they’ll owe him the $4 million guaranteed portion of his base salary.

Asomugha’s $15 million salary cap figure in 2013 is not just the highest on the team, it represents more than 10 percent of the Eagles’ total projected available cap space this coming season.

Combine his astronomical salary and cap figure with his woeful play on the field, and it’s impossible to imagine the Eagles keeping Asomugha, who is also due $12 million each in 2014 and 2015.
 
If they release him, they’ll eat only the $4 million guaranteed portion of his base salary and take a $4 million cap hit. It’s a lot of money but considering the Eagles’ vast amount of cap space, not prohibitive.
 
If Asomugha’s play was even adequate, the Eagles could ask Asomugha to cut his pay to return. But Asomugha really represents everything that went wrong with this team last year, and it’s tough to come up any realistic scenario in which he stays.

Eagles general manager Howie Roseman, asked Tuesday about Asomugha, hardly gave him a ringing endorsement.
 
The question: Was signing Asomugha a mistake?
 
Roseman: “We were 4-12 last year, so there were a lot of mistakes that were made, and we’re very disappointed about the results.
 
“We want to make sure that going forward that we have the right fits for our scheme and fitting into our culture for every player on the team.
 
“At the same, we want to make sure we communicate with all our players and talk to them about their role when it’s appropriate.”

Which sure seems to be a nicer way of saying: “He stinks, but we haven’t told him we’re cutting him yet.”

Asomugha isn’t the only veteran Eagle in danger of getting cut.

Veteran defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins is due a $1.5 million roster bonus on March 17. He’s due $4.5 million in base salary, with $1.5 million of it guaranteed. So if the Eagles release him, they’d spend $1.5 million to save another $1.5 million.

Evan Mathis is due a $1 million roster bonus on March 24, but he was the Eagles’ offensive MVP last year and it’s hard to imagine he doesn’t fit into new head coach Chip Kelly’s plans.
 
Nate Allen is an interesting name. He’s due a $709,000 roster bonus next month to go with a modest $642,000 base salary, $575,000 of which is guaranteed. Not much of a savings. Do the Eagles consider him salvageable? We’ll find out soon.

One other oddity regarding the Eagles’ 2013 payroll: 2011 Pro Bowl defensive end Jason Babin, released during the 2012 season, has a $900,000 cap figure thanks to an accelerated portion of his original signing bonus.
 
Babin, now with the Jaguars actually has the 18th-highest 2013 cap figure on the team.

Thanks to their $23,046,035 in unspent 2012 payroll, the Eagles have a projected adjusted salary cap of about $145 million, since the unadjusted cap figure is expected to be about $122 million.

The players they currently have under contract have a combined 2013 cap hit of $126,680,602, although that number is certain to come down as the Eagles trim the roster in the coming weeks.
 
The Eagles’ 10-richest 2013 contracts add up to $68,316,625 against the cap, or nearly half their available cap space.

The list below illustrates the gap between the haves and the relative have-nots in the NFL. The Eagles have 14 players with a cap figure of $2.3 million or higher but only three between $768,000 and $2.3 million.
 
Here’s a look at the 2013 cap figures of everybody currently on the Eagles’ roster (with the exception of Dennis Dixon and Ed Wang, whose contracts are not yet available. Also: If a player is listed twice, it’s because he signed two separate contracts last year with the Ealges):
 
Nnamdi Asomugha        $15,000,000    
Jason Peters                   $11,042,000    
DeSean Jackson             $9,000,000      
Cullen Jenkins               $5,600,000      
Trent Cole                     $5,350,000      
LeSean McCoy               $4,940,625      
Jeremy Maclin                $4,553,000      
Brent Celek                    $4,531,000      
Todd Herremans            $4,300,000      
Evan Mathis                   $4,000,000      
Mike Patterson               $3,000,000      
Brandon Graham             $2,957,500      
Jason Avant                    $2,710,000      
Fletcher Cox                   $2,327,545
Nate Allen                      $1,242,000      
Mychal Kendricks           $1,010,101      
Mat McBriar                    $920,000         
*Jason Babin                   $900,000
Vinny Curry                    $768,598
Curtis Marsh                  $760,880         
Clay Harbor                    $743,225
Antonio Dixon                $735,000
Allen Barbre                    $720,000
Trent Edwards                 $715,000
Evan Moore                      $715,000
Riley Cooper                    $672,871
Casey Matthews               $663,716
Alex Henery                     $660,027         
Nick Foles                        $655,880         
Jamar Chaney                   $645,064         
Kurt Coleman                   $640,842         
Everette Brown                  $630,000         
Brandon Hughes               $630,000         
Nick Miller                        $630,000         
Dion Lewis                        $602,220         
Matt Kopa                          $588,333
Brandon Boykin                  $581,367
Jason Kelce                        $579,358         
*Jaiquawn Jarrett                $558,636
Dennis Kelly                       $527,220         
Phillip Hunt                        $511,668         
Bryce Brown                        $492,720         
Damaris Johnson                $485,000
Chris Polk                           $483,333         
Ronnie Cameron                 $480,000
Marcus Dowtin                   $480,000         
Stanley Havili                     $480,000         
Chris Hawkins                    $480,000         
Uchechukwu Igwenagu       $480,000
Trevard Lindley                   $480,000         
Marvin McNutt                    $480,000         
Nate Menkin                       $480,000         
Ryan Rau                             $480,000
Dallas Reynolds                  $480,000         
Chris McCoy                        $412,500         
Derek Carrier                       $405,000         
B.J. Cunningham                  $405,000         
Ron Johnson                        $405,000         
Matt Reynolds                      $405,000
*Keenan Clayton                  $116,698
*Mike Kafka                          $116,698         
*Marvin McNutt                    $74,172           
*Jordan Ford                         $8,334
*Uchechukwu Igwenagu       $7,334
*Charles Henry                     $5,834
*Brett Brackett                      $3,334
*Cliff Harris                          $3,334
*Tevita Finau                        $1,334
*Matt Camilli                        $667    
*Alfred McCullough              $667    
 
* -- Player Released

Eagles-Redskins scouting report: Secondary must stand up vs. Kirk Cousins

Eagles-Redskins scouting report: Secondary must stand up vs. Kirk Cousins

Eagles (5-7) vs. Redskins (6-5-1)
Sunday, 1 p.m. on Fox
Redskins favored by 2; over/under 47

When the Eagles went into FedEx Field in Week 6, they had an opportunity to leave 4-1 and in great position in the NFC East. Instead, what ensued was a stretch of three divisional losses in four weeks by a combined 18 points.

Two months later, the Eagles are out of the race at 5-7 while the 6-5-1 Redskins are still battling for an NFC wild-card spot. The 'Skins would be out of the playoffs if the season ended today — they currently hold the seventh spot in the NFC, behind the Bucs (7-5) but ahead of the Vikings and Packers (6-6).

This is obviously a crucial game for Washington, but the Eagles are just as desperate after losing by 11, 14 and 18 points the last three weeks. Don't underestimate the role desperation and a few weeks of embarrassment can have on a team's ability to bounce back. It was partly why I cautioned in these scouting reports the last two weeks not to count out either Green Bay or Cincinnati, teams that had more talent and stability than a few weeks of midseason losses indicated.

Cousins and Reed
The next time the Eagles limit Kirk Cousins will be the first time. In four games against them, he's completed 63 percent of his passes, averaged 336 yards, thrown 10 TDs and two interceptions and rushed for another score. Washington has averaged 31 points and won three of the four contests.

The Eagles' margin of error on defense is extremely small in this game. To win, they'll need a better effort against a Redskins' ground game that gashed them for 230 yards last time, they'll need to generate consistent pressure on Cousins and they'll need Jordan Reed to not be himself.

Reed, the NFC's most dangerous tight end, is questionable with a Grade 3 AC joint separation suffered on Thanksgiving. Reed was a warrior on Turkey Day, leaving the game in the second quarter, standing on the sideline in a sling, probably receiving a little (ahem) help at halftime, and then dominating in the second half in Dallas. Reed finished that game with 12 catches for 95 yards and two TDs, but was hurt badly enough to miss last week's game.

The Eagles were fortunate to avoid Reed in the season's earlier matchup. Fortunate because he destroyed them last December, catching nine passes for 129 yards and two TDs in a 14-point win. Washington uses its tight ends more than any offense in the league, and Reed is a mismatch even for an Eagles team that has allowed the fewest catches (31) and receiving yards (327) to tight ends. 

With Reed out in October, backup Vernon Davis burned the Eagles for two catches, 50 yards and a TD. But it sounds like Reed will play Sunday after telling reporters that his range of motion is back.

The issue in stopping Washington is the Eagles just don't have enough defensive backs to defend everything. It's why they need Fletcher Cox and Brandon Graham to get consistent pressure and keep Cousins out of a rhythm. They haven't been able to do that. They had no sacks in Washington in Week 6 and have failed to sack Cousins in two of the last three meetings.

Without forcing Cousins to get off his spot and get the ball out quickly, the Eagles' secondary hasn't shown anything to inspire confidence they can stop DeSean Jackson, Jamison Crowder, Pierre Garcon, Reed and Davis at the same time.

To make matters worse, this is the first week Washington's All-Pro left tackle, Trent Williams, is back from a four-game substance abuse suspension. According to Pro Football Focus, Williams has allowed just three sacks in his last eight games against the Eagles.

Which Wentz will show?
Last week was Carson Wentz's worst game as an NFL quarterback. He missed wide-open throws, threw three interceptions and could have thrown more and barely exceeded 300 yards despite throwing the ball 60 times. 

He didn't look like the guy we saw the first four games of the season, and quite frankly he hasn't looked like a top-20 QB since October. 

The lack of weapons and occasionally poor protection are major reasons why, but Wentz isn't void of blame — he's simply missed some makeable throws.

Against Washington back on Oct. 16, Wentz was just 11 of 22 for 179 yards as the Eagles lost the time of possession battle. The best days belonged to Ryan Mathews (9 carries, 60 yards) and Jordan Matthews (three catches, 75 yards). Both are questionable heading into this one. 

Wentz didn't throw a single pass at Josh Norman in the first meeting. At times, Norman has followed the opposing team's top receiver, but don't expect him to do so this Sunday. Norman has lined up on the left side 64 percent of the time this season and in the slot just nine percent. 

Slot matchup
Matthews has run 73 percent of his routes from the slot and should draw third-round pick Kendall Fuller. As long as Matthews is sufficiently recovered from his ankle injury, this should be a good matchup for the Eagles. 

Fuller has been beaten repeatedly this season, allowing 42 catches (on 53 targets) for 542 yards and two touchdowns. Quarterbacks have a 123.9 rating against him, third-worst among all slot corners. (Malcolm Jenkins is actually worst in this category with a 137.9 QB rating allowed in the slot.)

Fuller has also struggled to wrap receivers up after the catch, allowing an NFL-high 213 yards after the catch. Picking up yards after a reception is something the Eagles have struggled to do all year.

Run game
The Eagles were shutting running backs down until they played the Redskins in October. Since-demoted RB Matt Jones rushed for 135 yards, current starter Rob Kelley rushed for 59, and both had a run of 45-plus yards.

Cox, Barwin and LB Nigel Bradham had awful games that afternoon against the run. It also didn't help that the Eagles were credited with 12 missed tackles. 

Run-stuffer Bennie Logan left that game early with a groin injury and missed the next three weeks. Since returning, however, Logan hasn't been himself, struggling to rush the passer and stop the run.

The Kerrigan factor
The Eagles always have trouble containing Redskins pass rusher Ryan Kerrigan, who had three sacks in the first meeting. 

Kerrigan has been a force in 2016 with 44 QB hurries, which is three more than Kahlil Mack and second-most among outside linebackers to Von Miller.

Kerrigan has nine sacks in 11 career games against the Eagles, and Washington is 5-1 when he has at least one against them.

Prediction
Close game, better performance from Wentz and an awakening in the run game, but not enough defensive talent to shut down what Washington will try to do deep with Jackson and Crowder, over the middle with Reed and short with Garcon.

Redskins 31, Eagles 27

Nearly back from injury, Mathews hopes to rejuvenate Eagles' running game

Nearly back from injury, Mathews hopes to rejuvenate Eagles' running game

It’s been a fairly rocky season for Ryan Mathews, who cost the Eagles the Lions game with a late fumble, was demoted by head coach Doug Pederson for a spell, hurt his knee against the Seahawks and missed two games and is on pace for a third straight season under 600 rushing yards.

Mathews, who missed the double-digit losses to the Packers and Bengals, is expected to return on Sunday, when the fading Eagles face the Redskins.

Mathews is an interesting case. When he’s gotten at least nine carries this year, the Eagles are 4-2. When he’s gotten fewer or hasn’t played, the Eagles are 1-5.

Here’s the Mathews conundrum: He’s averaging a healthy 4.2 yards per carry and ranks eighth in the entire NFL with seven rushing touchdowns. Yet he’s gotten more than 11 carries only three times – in wins against the Browns, Vikings and Falcons.

Without him the last two weeks, the Eagles ran 37 times for a total of 134 yards, just 3.6 a pop. And lost.

He’s no Shady, Westbrook or Duce, but he does move the chains.

“I think Ryan brings definitely a different dimension,” center Jason Kelce said. “He’s an extremely powerful, explosive back. He hits the hole hard. There’s been some games he’s been absolutely dominant when he’s gotten the opportunities. 

“He’s done a great job for us. Good to have him back, glad he’s healthy and back out there and hopefully we can get something going for him up front.”

Mathews actually ranks 11th in the NFL since 2010 with 36 rushing touchdowns.

He said he feels 100 percent three weeks after injuring his knee in Seattle.

“I feel good,” he said at his locker after practice Thursday. “Tried to get back out there with my teammates and get back in the groove of things. 

“I’m good enough to practice and go. It’s just getting back in the rhythm, getting the timing down. I missed two weeks and it’s kind of hard. Just trying to get back in the groove of things.”

The Eagles take a 5-7 record and three-game losing streak into their 1 p.m. kickoff Sunday against the 6-5-1 Redskins at the Linc.

The Redskins have won four straight over the Eagles. A win would give them their first five-game winning streak over their NFC East rival since a six-game stretch from 1981 through 1984.

“It’s hard,” Mathews said. “We just have to learn from the mistakes and push forward. We can’t change anything in the past, we can’t undo the games. We get another chance Sunday to go out there and play our best.”

Rookie Wendell Smallwood has been the Eagles’ leading rusher the last three weeks, but the Eagles haven’t had anybody run for as many as 50 yards since the Atlanta game – the last time they won.

The Eagles have some very faint playoff hopes at this point. But it won’t hurt to get Mathews back.

“Well, he's definitely a bigger back,” Pederson said. “He's a little bit more between-the-tackles and has that veteran experience that you see out of him. 

“It will be good to get him back out on the field Sunday and get him some more work.”

This has been a weird year for the Eagles’ running game, which has generally been fairly effective when Pederson commits to it. 

But that rarely happens. 

Either the Eagles find themselves too far behind to stick with it or Pederson just decides to have Carson Wentz throw the ball 50 times and the running backs whither on the bench.

“It’s tough,” Mathews said. “We as a group have to do our job and when our number is called we have to make plays. We’ll get it going.”

The Eagles haven’t had anybody get 20 carries in a game since opening day. Nobody’s gotten more than 13 carries since Mathews against the Falcons.

Mathews, twice a 1,000-yard rusher, could well be playing his final few games as an Eagle.

Curiously, his 4.64 average in an Eagles uniform is fifth-best ever by players with a minimum of 200 carries behind three quarterbacks – Michael Vick (6.70), Randall Cunningham (6.62) and Donovan McNabb (5.67) – and LeSean McCoy (4.65).

So with a strong final few games, he could actually own the highest rushing average in franchise history by a running back.

Mathews, who’s gotten nine or more carries in back-to-back games only twice in two years with the Eagles, said his only remaining goal is to finish strong.

“It would be awesome,” he said. “That’s the main thing you want to do. Take it one game at a time and just try to get better and finish off strong.”