Sherman's 2014 NFL Mock Draft 1.0

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Sherman's 2014 NFL Mock Draft 1.0

1. Houston Texans - Johnny Manziel, QB, Texas A&M
Manziel might not be the best pure passer in the draft, but his leadership, ability to keep plays alive with his feet and marketability in Texas will all be too hard to pass on for new head man Bill O'Brien.

2. St. Louis Rams (via Washington) - Jake Matthews, OT, Texas A&M
Left tackle Jake Long's 2013 season ended with a torn ACL and MCL. Combine that with former right tackle/right guard Rodger Saffold being a free agent, and the Rams need to find an anchor for their offensive line.

3. Jacksonville Jaguars - Jadeveon Clowney, DE, South Carolina
Yes, the Jags need a QB, but a player as talented as Clowney doesn't fall into your lap every day. Forget the nonsense about Clowney dogging it this year -- he should have been in the NFL already. Gus Bradley is getting the best defensive end prospect to come out since Mario Williams in 2006.

4. Cleveland Browns - Sammy Watkins, WR, Clemson
Perhaps my favorite player in the draft, Watkins, along with Josh Gordon, would give the Browns arguably the most explosive receiving duo in the AFC. Yes, the Browns probably need a QB here, but Cleveland really seems to like Brian Hoyer (one of the reasons they parted ways with head coach Rob Chudzinski and offensive coordinator Norv Turner, who didn't share that fondness), and they might feel they just need to surround him with weapons.

5. Oakland Raiders - Teddy Bridgewater, QB, Louisville
At a point last season, Terrelle Pryor looked like a possible long-term starter in Oakland. But things seemed to deteriorate as the season slogged on, and I don't see him sticking around much longer. Bridgewater isn't a flashy guy. He doesn't have Matt Stafford's arm, Michael Vick's legs, or Ben Roethlisberger's size. He just makes good reads, throws a great ball, and leads his team like a QB should.

6. Atlanta Falcons - Greg Robinson, OT, Auburn
The Falcons need help both protecting and rushing the QB. With Clowney off the board, the best option still available is Auburn's redshirt sophomore. Robinson is huge (6-5, 320), mobile, and nasty. He's not the technician Matthews is yet, but he's more talented physically.

7. Tampa Bay Buccaneers - Khalil Mack, OLB/DE, Buffalo
The Bucs would love to upgrade the talent around Mike Glennon, but Mack is too talented to pass on here. Mack can play OLB or put his hand in the dirt as a pass-rushing defensive end. The Bucs got very little production out of Daniel Te'o-Nesheim (go figure) and would welcome the heat Mack could bring on passing downs.

8. Minnesota Vikings - Blake Bortles, QB, Central Florida
The Christian Ponder Era in Minnesota is coming to a close. Backup Matt Cassel generally outplayed the former first-round pick, and the fans are clamoring for an upgrade. While I'm not very high on Bortles because of his arm strength and poor performances against some tougher teams this season, he does have a good pocket presence and the size and speed to be a problem once he breaks contain.

9. Buffalo Bills - Marqise Lee, WR, USC
The Bills invested a first-round pick in QB E.J. Manuel last season and need to continue to give him some tools to work with. Lee is an elusive receiver who can take the top off a defense. Dangerous in the open field, Lee would complement the bigger Stevie Johnson well.

10. Detroit Lions - Justin Gilbert, CB, Oklahoma State
The secondary continues to be the Achilles heel of a very talented (if undisciplined) defense in Detroit. Gilbert is a tall (6-1/200) corner with sprinter's speed, great hands and quick hips. And while Eagles fans know the Lions have a pretty good kick returner in Jeremy Ross, Gilbert was also a dangerous returner for Oklahoma State, scoring six kickoff return touchdowns during his career in Stillwater.

11. Tennessee Titans - Anthony Barr, OLB, UCLA
With new head coach Ken Whisenhunt installing the 3-4 defense in Tennessee, outside pass rushers are now a priority. Barr, a converted offensive player, is still learning to play outside linebacker, but his physical size (6-5, 245), speed, and athletic ability are hard to match. Barr will need to become more consistent, as he disappears at times, but the 26 sacks he's recorded in the past two years prove he shows up more often than not.

12. New York Giants - Timmy Jernigan, DT, Florida State
The Giants are looking at two of their key defensive linemen -- Justin Tuck and Linval Joseph -- possibly leaving as free agents. While that still leaves Jason Pierre-Paul in blue, restocking may be necessary. Jernigan isn't a massive run-stopper (6-2, 298) but is thickly built, strong as an ox, and lightning quick off the snap. It is a lot of fun watching him play. Jernigan would provide more of a pass rush element to the interior of the line, and I'm stumped to find a defensive tackle better at using his hands and quickness to get into the backfield.

13. St. Louis Rams - Darqueze Dennard, CB, Michigan State
Even though safety might be a bigger priority in the Rams' secondary, Dennard is a better player than either of the two top safety prospects (Ha Ha Clinton-Dix and Calvin Pryor). St. Louis has two good starting corners in Janoris Jenkins and Trumaine Johnson and could possibly restructure Cortland Finnegan's contract to keep him around. But in the pass-happy NFL, you just can't have enough cover guys, and Dennard is one of the smartest in the draft.

14. Chicago Bears - C.J. Mosley, LB, Alabama
The Bears' defense was among the worst in the NFL in 2013, and they have needs at every position. Mosley could be this year's Luke Kuechly -- a player whose physical skills might not leap off game tape but who just seems to be in the right place on every snap. Mosley is athletic enough to man the strong side, but I see him supplanting Jon Bostic inside and becoming the Bears' next great MLB.

15. Pittsburgh Steelers - Mike Evans, WR, Texas A&M
The emergence of Antonio Brown was a nice surprise for the Steelers in 2013, and they'll look to give him a complementary receiver with the impending free agency of Emmanuel Sanders and Jerricho Cotchery. Evans (6-4, 220) is a big target and should be a nice red-zone weapon. He's not a speedster, but he uses his big body and good hands to out-muscle defensive backs.

16. Baltimore Ravens - Eric Ebron, TE, North Carolina
All three of Baltimore's top tight ends -- Dennis Pitta, Ed Dickson, and Dallas Clark -- are unrestricted free agents this offseason. Chances are Pitta is franchised, but Baltimore needs to find depth and additional weapons for a very mediocre offense. Ebron (6-4/245) is a dynamic pass catcher with speed, size and great hands.

17. Dallas Cowboys - Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, S, Alabama
I'm sure Cowboys fans grew tired of watching undrafted rookie safety Jeff Heath get torched time and again in 2013, but with little depth or talent at the position, Dallas doesn't look to be in much better shape even if safeties Barry Church and J.J. Wilcox are healthy. Clinton-Dix (6-1/208) excels in coverage (he had seven career interceptions), using his size and speed to cause havoc in the secondary.

18. New York Jets - Kelvin Benjamin, WR, Florida State
While the Jets' QB situation continues to be a mess, reaching for Derek Carr here isn't the solution. Geno Smith certainly struggled as a rookie, but when your best receiver is Kellen Winslow, Jr. you don't have much of a chance to succeed. Benjamin (6-5, 234) isn't exactly a slam dunk here either, as the redshirt sophomore isn't polished as a receiver, but his physical tools and size are too tantalizing to pass up.

19. Miami Dolphins - Taylor Lewan, OT, Michigan
The Jonathan Martin-Richie Incognito kerfuffle is now in the past and the Dolphins need to start rebuilding their offensive line. Lewan (6-7, 314) isn't an elite athlete like Robinson or Matthews, but with his size and strength, he could start at right tackle immediately.

20. Arizona Cardinals - Jace Amaro, TE, Texas Tech
The Cardinals haven't had a Pro Bowl tight end since Jackie Smith in 1970. How is that possible? With Larry Fitzgerald slowing a bit, Arizona needs to continue to find offensive weapons. Amaro is an elite pass catcher who will give linebackers and safeties fits.

21. Green Bay Packers - Louis Nix III, DT, Notre Dame
The Packers' defense wasn't quite as bad in 2013 as it was in 2012, but with three of their DTs heading into free agency -- Johnny Jolly, Ryan Pickett and B.J. Raji -- finding a plug in the middle is vital. Nix III (6-2, 350) tore his meniscus near the end of the season but should be ready to roll by the time workouts begin. He played nose tackle at Notre Dame, using his size and quickness to be a disruptive force against the run. He'll probably need to lose some weight to stay on the field for longer stretches.

22. Philadelphia Eagles - Calvin Pryor, S, Louisville
Like a broken record, the Eagles continue to look for an answer at safety. With four of their safeties -- Kurt Coleman, Nate Allen, Patrick Chung and Colt Anderson -- heading for free agency, and 2013 draft pick Earl Wolff unproven, talent and depth at the position is sorely needed. Pryor (6-2/208) is a big safety who played in the box quite a bit for the Cardinals. Against the run he diagnoses plays quickly and arrives at the ball carrier in a foul mood. You can find a couple of his knockout (and legal) hits on YouTube. In coverage, Pryor hasn't played a lot of man-to-man, but watching him change directions in zone and track the ball leads me to believe he's more than capable of taking on tight ends and slot receivers.

Side note: If Pryor was gone here I would have had a hard time selecting between LSU WR Odell Beckham, Jr. and Notre Dame OL Zack Martin.

23. Kansas City Chiefs - Zack Martin, OL, Notre Dame
The Chiefs rose from the ashes in 2013 under new coach Andy Reid but face some challenges going into 2014. Starting guard Jon Asamoah and tackles Geoff Schwartz and Branden Albert are free agents. Albert is most likely gone with 2013 first-overall pick Eric Fisher sliding from right to left tackle. Depending on how much Asamoah is asking for, he could be gone, too. Martin played both right and left tackle for the Irish, and despite having shorter-than-ideal arms, he flourished. He is powerful, moves very well and has a nasty demeanor. Martin could slide into the starting guard or right tackle spot depending on what the Chiefs decide to do in free agency.

24. Cincinnati Bengals - Kony Ealy, DE, Missouri
Chances are the Bengals will re-sign DE Michael Johnson, but their defensive line, wracked by injuries in 2013, could use some reinforcements. Ealy is a versatile end who can shift inside on passing downs. His pass rush repertoire is a bit light but his power and quickness off the ball will get him by in the short-term.

25. San Diego Chargers - Ra'Shede Hageman, DT, Minnesota
The Chargers need to address a porous secondary, but with no one on the board worth this high a pick, they should address their thin defensive line instead. Hageman (6-6, 300) is a physical specimen with an explosive burst and brute strength to match. There are some technique issues that need to be ironed out, but the Bolts could be getting a disruptive force in the middle of an improving, young defense.

26. Cleveland Browns - Derek Carr, QB, Fresno State
I really like Derek Carr's physical abilities and have him ranked as high as any QB except Manziel. The issue he'll have to work out is his pocket presence and his ability to stay in it without getting happy feet. As I stated above, the Browns seem to really like Hoyer, but I cannot imagine they really think he's a long-term play. Carr is a guy they can stash for a season and work with before he takes over in 2015.

27. New Orleans Saints - Morgan Moses, OT, Virginia
After years of upgrading a terrible defense, the Saints are finally in a position to focus on reworking an aging offense. With both of last season's starting tackles, Charles Brown and Zach Strief, hitting free agency, New Orleans needs to find some protection for Drew Brees. Moses (6-6, 325) played both right and left tackle for the Cavaliers during his career, but with Terron Armstead most likely staying put on the left side, Moses will fit nicely on the right.

28. Carolina Panthers - Odell Beckham, Jr., WR, LSU
The Panthers have all but sucked star wide receiver Steve Smith dry at this point and desperately need to find a complementary receiver to take some stress off his soon-to-be 35-year-old body. Beckham, Jr. (5-11/208) is a dynamic playmaker who can take it to the house from anywhere on the field. While not tall, he is solidly built and can jump out of the stadium. It also helps that Beckham Jr. has some of the best hands in the draft. Plus, he can do this.

29. New England Patriots - Austin Seferian-Jenkins, TE, Washington
Despite all the injuries the defense suffered in 2013, it was the offense that ultimately failed the Patriots in the playoffs. Without tight ends Rob Gronkowski and Aaron Hernandez, the New England passing game wasn't as dynamic or scary as it used to be, making Tom Brady look almost human at times. Seferian-Jenkins (6-6, 266) is a huge target with fluid moves and good hands. The Pats will have to do some investigating, though -- he was arrested prior to the 2013 season for a DUI after wrecking his car.

30. San Francisco 49ers - Stephon Tuitt, DE, Notre Dame
According to Richard Sherman's post-NFC Championship Game rant, the Niners need to upgrade their receiving corps. I tend to agree with him, but the position is pretty deep in this draft, and a talent like Tuitt is too hard to pass up at this juncture. Tuitt is a perfect fit for San Fran's 3-4 alignment, and with Justin Smith on the wrong side of 30, Tuitt should be able to contribute early.

31. Denver Broncos - Ryan Shazier, LB, Ohio State
The Broncos' defense surprised a lot of people in its run to the Super Bowl, and with multiple linebackers heading into free agency after the season, Denver needs to restock. Shazier is a versatile player capable of playing inside or out. His speed is outstanding and he makes his home in opposing backfields. In coverage, Shazier (6-2, 226) uses his speed and quick feet to mirror would-be pass catchers. The only knock on him is his size, but the Broncos aren't afraid of playing with smaller LBs (see Wesley Woodyard).

32. Seattle Seahawks - Allen Robinson, WR, Penn State
The Seahawks have some nice offensive pieces in receivers Golden Tate and Doug Baldwin, and some big health concerns with Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin, but what they ultimately lack is a true No. 1 receiver. Robinson (6-3, 210) is a big target and is dangerous anywhere on the field. He has deep speed as well as the quickness and open-field ability to be dangerous on bubble screens.

Eagles rookie Isaac Seumalo passes 1st test in return to practice

Eagles rookie Isaac Seumalo passes 1st test in return to practice

As far as tests go, Monday was a pretty good one.
 
While the Eagles’ kicked off training camp in 90-degree weather, all the early-morning thunderstorm did was raise the humidity level to the point where it felt like the team was practicing in thick, hot gelatin.
 
So, yeah, pretty good test. And Isaac Seumalo passed with flying colors.
 
“He’s sharp,” head coach Doug Pederson said about the third-round offensive lineman. “He picked up where he left off back in rookie camp.”
 
That was the rookie camp way back on May 13-15. It was the last time Seumalo practiced with the team thanks to the arcane NCAA/NFL rule that trapped him at Oregon State, one of the schools that operates on a quarters system.  
 
So while the rest of his teammates and fellow rookies went through OTAs and minicamp, Seumalo was thousands of miles away, just trying to keep up.
 
“It sucked,” Seumalo said, just off the field Monday, after his first practice in over two months.
 
“I wanted to be here and practicing. I just tried to work out and get in shape, gain weight, get healthy, do as much as I could to come back ready to go.”
 
While stuck at Oregon State, Seumalo worked with a strength coach to put on some muscle and studied his Eagles playbook as much as he could.
 
The rookie also had lengthy Skype sessions with offensive line coach Jeff Stoutland. According to Seumalo, he Skyped with Stoutland for a half-hour to an hour, four or five times per week. The two would go over the playbook install for that day and whatever tweaks were incorporated.
 
No, not live reps, but still pretty valuable 1-on-1 teaching time from position coach.
 
In addition to his sessions with Stoutland, Seumalo also kept in touch with fellow rookie offensive lineman Halapoulivaati Vaitai and his former college teammate, guard/center Josh Andrews, whom Seumalo calls “Juice.”  
 
On Monday, thanks to a lack of numbers (there are just 38 players in camp until the rest of the veterans report on Wednesday), Seumalo played all three positions on the offensive line: guard, center and even tackle for a few snaps to give Malcolm Bunche a breather.
 
But Seumalo’s certainly more comfortable at guard and center, and he said Monday the Eagles want him to work on playing left guard.
 
It’s not too hard to figure out why. While Jason Peters, Jason Kelce, Brandon Brooks and Lane Johnson all seemingly have their jobs completely clinched, incumbent left guard starter Allen Barbre is still working with the first-team after a disappointing 2015. While Pederson was quick to name Barbre the starter this spring, it seems like Seumalo will have a chance to at least compete for the job, along with veteran Stefen Wisniewski.
 
“Last time I checked, in the NFL, the five best play,” Seumalo said. “If I’m one of those, it’s me. If not, I’m going to bust my butt to help this team in any way I can.”
 
It’ll certainly be somewhat of an uphill battle for Seumalo as he returns from his long stay away from the team. Pederson admitted as much Monday morning.
 
“But he’s such a hard worker,” the head coach quickly said. “He’s smart. The time spent with Coach Stoutland in the offseason, he proved himself today coming back. It’s almost like he’s gone through a whole offseason of the information. I don’t have any issues with Isaac.”
 
Through some heavy breathing, Seuamol admitted the first day back at practice was a little rough on him, saying it doesn’t matter how good of shape anyone is in: the first day back is always tough.
 
The heat made it even tougher. How did he get through it?
 
“Just like everybody else, man,” Seumalo said. “One day at a time.”
 
It was a tough test, but he passed it. Many more to come.

Roob's 25 Random Points: Kenjon Barner, Freddy Galvis, Father John Misty and more

Roob's 25 Random Points: Kenjon Barner, Freddy Galvis, Father John Misty and more

Chase Daniel vs. Carson Wentz. Lehigh vs. the NovaCare. LeSean McCoy vs. Ryan Mathews. Freddy Galvis vs. Cookie Rojas. Joan Jett vs. Todd Rundgren. Andy Reid vs. Doug Pederson. Tim Showalter vs. Father John Misty.

Whaaaaaaaat???

It can only be a another edition of … Roob’s 25 Random Points.

1. I understand why more and more NFL teams are holding training camp at their year-round facilities and leaving their long-time summer homes on college campuses in small towns across the country. The logistics of moving operations to a remote location combined with the elimination of two-a-day workouts has really rendered remote training camps anachronistic. I get all that. But that said, I really miss it. Training camp was my favorite part of the season, for a few reasons. I loved how kids could interact with their favorite players before and after practice. Chatting, autographs, photos, whatever. I loved seeing a player as accomplished as Dawk spend 30 minutes after practice on a blazing hot day, standing by the fence signing autographs for whoever wandered over. I loved stuff as corny as a little 6-year-old kid walking with a hulking offensive lineman, carrying shoulder pads that were bigger than they were. But I also loved the connection between big-time NFL teams and small-town America. The way the Eagles would settle into Bethlehem for a month every summer and become part of the fabric of the community. And watching every morning as the parade of cars filled with Eagles fans wound through the mountain roads toward a day watching free football. And just the action on the football field. Seeing unknown rookies blossom into NFL players in front of our eyes. Watching superstars like Randall and Donovan and Michael Vick make unbelievable plays while a few thousand fans watched in amazement from just a few feet away. And just watching and listening to personalities like Asante Samuel, who was just as intent on making the fans laugh as he was on beating his man. It was a unique atmosphere, and I loved every minute of it, and it’s a shame it’s gone.

2. If Sam Bradford gets benched or hurt and Chase Daniel replaces him, I will be extremely disappointed.

3. He’s a grizzled veteran and an older guy and has been in the league a while and backed up Drew Brees and Alex Smith and spent time in K.C. with Doug Pederson. But let’s be honest. What has Chase Daniel accomplished that Carson Wentz hasn’t? He’s 29 years old and has one career touchdown pass. So in six years, he’s built a one-TD lead over Wentz in career touchdown passes. Come on. Wentz has to be No. 2. Has to be.

4. I’m not exactly sure why I have faith in Kenjon Barner, but I do. He’s got only 34 career carries and he’s fumbled twice, so that’s a concern. But I think the kid runs hard and runs tough and we know he’s fast. He averaged 4.4 yards per carry in limited action last year, but I’m very curious to see him in action this preseason. We all know Ryan Mathews’ injury history, and we all know that Darren Sproles is 33 and coming off a season where he averaged just 3.8 yards per carry, his lowest since 2009. So Barner could have a seriously expanded role this year. If he does, I think he’ll be just fine.

5. One encouraging thing about Mathews: Just looking at his career, when he’s healthy, he rarely has a bad game. Like a total dud of a game. He’s had 20 or more carries 17 times and rushed for at least 90 yards in 14 of those 17 games. In the other three, he had 65, 74 and 78 yards. When he gets 20 carries, he’s averaged 105 yards. Just for the sake of comparison, when LeSean McCoy gets 20 carries, he’s rushed for 90 or more yards just 18 of 31 times. But he’s averaged 118 yards in those games. So McCoy is more likely to get you 130 yards. When getting 20 carries in their careers, McCoy has rushed for 90 yards only 58 percent of the time but 130 yards 29 percent of the time. Mathews has gotten 90 yards 82 percent of the time but 130 yards only 12 percent of the time.  

6. Among 18 active running backs who’ve had at least 15 games with 20 or more carries, only Jamaal Charles (86 percent) and Arian Foster (84 percent) have rushed for 90 yards on a higher percentage of their 20-carry games than Mathews. Only two have a lower percentage than Shady – Frank Gore (57 percent) and Matt Forte (54 percent). Interesting.

7. Since 1983, 31 quarterbacks have been taken with a top-five pick. Only two of them haven’t started at least one game as a rookie — Philip Rivers (behind Drew Brees) and Carson Palmer (behind Jon Kitna). In fact, the last top-five pick who didn’t start at least 10 games his rookie season was JaMarcus Russell in 2007. The last 11 all started double-digits.

8. Hey, has anybody had any luck redeeming those free Ticketmaster vouchers? Every time I log on, everything is unavailable. Somebody is getting free tickets to something but it’s not me!

9. I don’t think it’s a good thing when 100 games into the season, Freddy Galvis is second on your team in RBIs.

10. But he is. Galvis has 37 ribbies, second-most on the Phils. That puts him on pace for 60 this year. Maikel Franco is on pace for 89 RBIs, but the Phillies are on pace to have just one guy with more than 60 RBIs for the first time in a non-strike-shortened season in nearly half a century — since 1968, when Dick Allen led the Phils with 90 RBIs and Cookie Rojas was second with 48.

11. Tommy Keene. Write down that name. Look him up. Check out his music. He’s brilliant. There is no reason he’s not as big as Tom Petty. Don’t believe me? I don’t blame you. But listen.

12. I honestly would not be surprised if Caleb Sturgis beats out Cody Parkey. Why? Because kickers are weird. They can look like Hall of Famers one year and inept the next year. Remember Paul McFadden? Alex Henery? The stats say Parkey wins the job and it’s not close. But when we’re talking about kickers, nothing ever surprises me.

13. Before we send rookie seventh-round corner Jalen Mills to Canton based on an impressive series of minicamps, remember … minicamp equals no pads. And no pads equals not really football. The kid certainly has skill and speed and confidence. But nothing counts until the pads go on this week. And we’ve all seen minicamp superstars who quickly come back to earth when the real stuff starts. That said, it will sure be fun watching Mills and all these other young cornerbacks sort themselves out over the next few weeks. With Mills, Eric Rowe, JaCorey Sheperd, Randall Evans and Denzel Rice, the Eagles have a promising group of young corners behind veterans like Leodis McKelvin, Nolan Carroll and Ron Brooks. I still think Carroll and Rowe are your opening-day starters. But fair to say every spot at corner is up for grabs.

14. Weird that Billy Davis doesn’t have a job. Anywhere. You’d think he’d at least be a college linebacker coach somewhere. But maybe after the experience of the last three years, he just needed a break. I don’t think he coached very well here, especially last year, but I also don’t think last year’s defensive collapse was all his fault. He didn’t have a ton of talent to begin with. And the Eagles did have a top-10 defense halfway through the season. But nobody can coach a defense that’s forced to play 36 minutes a game.

15. Crazy that Brandon Graham, a draft pick in 2010, has now played under five defensive coordinators — Sean McDermott, Juan Castillo, Todd Bowles, Davis and Jim Schwartz. Five defensive coordinators in seven years.

16. You guys hear about Father John Misty Friday night at the Xponential Festival at Wiggins Park? Father John Misty (real name Joshua Tillman) is a hot-shot singer-songwriter who sells out mid-sized theaters everywhere he goes and shows up all the time on every rock critic’s Best Of list. Father John was booked to perform for 55 minutes at Xponential, but instead of performing he lectured the crowd incoherently about the Republican National Convention and the “meaningless of entertainment,” then played two songs — one unreleased, one a Leonard Cohen cover — before walking off the stage to a chorus of boos. A few people, mainly rock critics, defended the guy and called his performance “brilliant,” praising Tillman for not performing when his heart wasn’t in it and saying that’s the nature of art. Oh please. I’m sorry. There’s a time and a place for that sort of thing. A time and a place to make a statement. This wasn’t it. A lot of people paid a lot of money to hear the guy play music for nearly an hour, and he left all of them sorely confused and disappointed. He owes a lot of people a sincere apology.

17. Tim Showalter of the fantastic Philly band Strand of Oaks went after “Father John” brilliantly in a series of tweets: “Furthering your entertainment career by calling entertainment stupid. … Shows have saved my life. The stage is a privilege more importantly FANS are a privilege. Go on a lecture tour if you have so much to say…. Start a charity, work for habitat for humanity, volunteer, whatever. Be productive…. That's it. I love your music so much. But don't come to my town and insult my peoples intelligence.”

18. Was sitting around recently with some friends and started to wonder who has seen the most Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Famers in concert. I finished last with 26: Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, BB King, Beach Boys (Brian Wilson), Black Sabbath, Bobby Blue Bland, The Clash, Donovan, Fleetwood Mac, Peter Gabriel, Genesis, the Kinks, Paul McCartney, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Bonnie Raitt, Rascals, Lou Reed, REM, Rolling Stones, Linda Ronstadt, Santana, Pete Seeger, Bruce Springsteen, Muddy Waters, U2 and The Who. Go through the Hall of Fame list and figure out how many you’ve seen. I’ll bet it’s more than you think!

19. One thought on the credibility of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame: Joan Jett is in, Todd Rundgren is out. Get a clue, R&R Hall of Fame.

20. If it was up to me, smoking within a few feet of a child would be a crime.

21. Why is everything “curated” lately? What a pretentious word for “compiled” or “arranged” or “slapped together.” I mean … “Hey, I’m curating this week’s 25 Random Points today!” Who talks like that?

22. I like Sam Bradford more than most people. I think he’s a serviceable quarterback. My biggest issue with Bradford is his TD-INT ratio. He does a lot of things well but he doesn’t throw enough touchdowns and he throws too many interceptions. And those are really the two most-important stats for a quarterback. For his career, Bradford has thrown a touchdown every 29 pass attempts and an interception every 44 attempts. Among 156 quarterbacks who’ve thrown 1,000 passes since 1980, Bradford ranks 134th in TD percentage. So only 22 quarterbacks since 1980 have thrown touchdowns more infrequently. Among that group are Kent Graham, Steve Walsh, Rick Mirer, Dave Brown, Mike Pagel and Joey Harrington. Bradford has had three seasons (2010, 2012, 2015) where he’s thrown at least 500 passes and thrown 21 or fewer touchdowns. Only five other QBs in NFL history have had three such seasons.

23. This is kind of important. Because without getting the ball into the end zone, all the stats kind of don’t matter. There’s always been an excuse – new coach, new scheme, poor receivers – but the lack of TD passes has followed Bradford around his entire career, and I doubt it’s a coincidence.

24. One more Phillies point: After 51 of 81 home games, the Phillies are hitting .218 at Citizens Bank Park with an on-base percentage of .273 and an OPS of .627. Their home batting average is the worst by any MLB team since the Rangers hit .218 in 1972, their on-base percentage is the worst by any team at home since at least 1913 (as far back as baseball-reference.com goes), and their .627 home OPS is also worst by any MLB team since 1913. Barring a significant reversal in the last 30 home games, the Phillies could wind up as the worst-hitting team at home in the last 100 years.

25. I’ve always thought an Andy Reid press conference was just about the most boring thing imaginable. Then I started to see Doug Pederson press conferences and I’ve already changed my mind.

49ers promote former Eagles VP of player personnel Tom Gamble to assistant GM

49ers promote former Eagles VP of player personnel Tom Gamble to assistant GM

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- The San Francisco 49ers have promoted Tom Gamble to assistant general manager.

General manager Trent Baalke announced the move on Monday, calling Gamble an "accomplished talent evaluator."

Gamble returned to the 49ers in January 2015 as a senior personnel executive after spending two seasons in Philadelphia as vice president of player personnel. Gamble worked with current 49ers coach Chip Kelly during his time with the Eagles.

Gamble had spent eight seasons previously in San Francisco and was director of player personnel in his final two seasons. Gamble is entering his 29th season in the NFL.