Five Encouraging Parts of the Phillies Sweep of the Mets This Weekend

Five Encouraging Parts of the Phillies Sweep of the Mets This Weekend

We’ve gotten so used to crappy development after crappy development
with our teams this past year that it’s almost unsettling when something
unreservedly positive happens with one of them. But in case you were
too busy this weekend watching game film on Matt Barkley or celebrating
the historic demise of the Lakers and Celtics, the rumors are true–the
Phillies swept the Mets at Citi Field this weekend, winning three games
by a combined score of 18-5. If it was five years ago, this would have
been cause for rioting in the streets; even in 2013, it’s a pretty cool
thing.

None of the three games were even particularly close–yesterday
afternoon’s game was knotted for a while, but the Phils broke it open in
the seventh and the Mets never really fought back. And in the meantime,
a whole bunch of our guys who had been struggling some got to get back
on track. Some of the positives include:

1. Cole’s first win of the season. Hamels had gone a
dispiriting five starts without earning a W, despite going at least six
innings while allowing  three runs or fewer in his last three starts.
He finally got one yesterday, although it wasn’t Cole’s sharpest
performance–he walked an uncharacteristic six batters, his most since
July of last year. But he managed to get out of trouble and only let up
two hits all game, and after giving the Mets one in the first, went five
more scoreless before turning the game over to the bullpen.

2. The Bullpen holding tight. Speaking of which.
After being about as secure as a Playskool piggy bank for four games
against the Pirates, the bullpen was actually on lockdown for this
series, letting up only two hits and one run in seven innings of
combined work, the lone damage courtesy of a John Buck solo blast off
Jeremy Horst in a game the Phils were already leading 9-3. The bullpen
on this team was supposed to be a strength, so it’s good to see that the
Pittsburgh disaster situation does not appear to be a continuing
crisis.


3. Ryan getting on track. Ryan Howard only had one
hit in each of the three games–he was just a pinch-hitter in the third
game anyway–but he made them count, with a game-breaking three-run homer
in the first, a floodgate-opening RBI single in the second, and a huge,
go-ahead two-run double in the third. He ended with seven RBIs on the
series, awesome production from our hot-and-cold cleanup hitter. Ryan’s
clearly still not the MVP candidate he was a half-decade ago, with more
of his one-time home runs dying at the wall and his walk rate
diminishing to near non-existence, but if he can at least stay a net
positive on offense, we won’t be kept up at nights thinking about the
four years, nearly $100 mil left on his contract.

4. Dom and JMJ going back-to-back. Domonic Brown’s
alternately frustrating and tantalizing year continues, as he only went
3-13 on the series, but with one of those three being a three-run blast
that put game two of the series to bed in the fifth inning. John
Mayberry Jr. followed that with a solo blast of his own, continuing his
2011-level production for the season, with ten extra base hits (tied for
second on the team) in just 73 plate appearances. We could really use
at least one of these guys turning out to actually be a good, reliable
everyday outfielder, so we’ll continue to grasp onto these scraps while
gritting our teeth through their 0-4 with three strikeouts games.

5. Kyle going the distance. Kyle Kendrick picked up
just the second shutout victory of his career with a three-hit,
one-walk, five-K blanking of the Mets in the series opener. With his 2-1
record, 2.41 ERA, 1.10 WHIP and 3:1 K/BB ratio, Kendrick has been the
unlikely ace of the Phils’ pitching staff this year, despite making over
$15 million less than three of our other starters. It might not last,
but going back to the second half of last year now, Kendrick has made a
decisive case for being a reliable back-end starter, if not more. He
probably won’t get optioned to Triple A again at any point this year, at
the very least.

10 observations from Day 1 of Eagles' OTAs

10 observations from Day 1 of Eagles' OTAs

There was finally some football in South Philly on Tuesday as the Eagles kicked off the first round of their OTAs. 

Aside from a few notable absences -- Fletcher Cox, Jason Peters, Donnie Jones -- the Eagles had just about everyone on the field (see story)

Here are 10 observations from Tuesday's practice: 

1. Here's how the first-team offense looked: 
QB: Carson Wentz
RB: LeGarrette Blount
TE: Zach Ertz
OL (left to right): Lane Johnson, Isaac Seumalo, Jason Kelce, Brandon Brooks, Halapoulivaati Vaitai
WR: Alshon Jeffery, Torrey Smith, Jordan Matthews

2. Here's how the first-team defense looked: 
LDE: Brandon Graham
LDT: Destiny Vaeao
RDT: Tim Jernigan
RDE: Vinny Curry
LBs: Jordan Hicks, Nigel Bradham, Mychal Kendricks
S: Malcolm Jenkins, Rodney McLeod
CB: Jalen Mills, Patrick Robinson. 

Note: In the nickel package, rookie third-rounder Rasul Douglas came on the field as an outside cornerback and Mills slid into the slot. 

3. Early in the practice, in an offense-only drill, the Eagles were trying to audible into a new play, but there was some confusion with Blount, who didn't seem to know the play. Blount is still obviously learning the playbook, but it shows the respect they have for him that he was working with the ones already. 

4. The play the Eagles wanted to get into during that drill was a good one. Wentz rolled out to his right and found Jeffery streaking across the field. The two seem to be getting on just fine. 

Although later in 11-on-11s, Wentz tossed up an ill-advised pass deep to Jeffery in tight coverage and the ball was picked by McLeod. Jeffery will win a lot of battles, but that one was too much. 

5. Linebacker Joe Walker and cornerback Ron Brooks were on the field on Tuesday but didn't participate in team drills. Walker (ACL) and Brooks (quad tendon) are both recovering from significant injuries. 

6. The Eagles lined up a few times with Darren Sproles and Donnel Pumphrey on the field together. Those few times, Sproles was in the backfield and Pumphrey lined up in the slot. It's early, but we might get to see some creativity from Doug Pederson with these two this year. 

7. Dillon Gordon, whom the Eagles signed as an undrafted rookie last year, did something interesting on Tuesday. The offensive tackle, who played tight end in college, took a few reps at tight end in limited offensive drills. That's intriguing because if he could play the role of an extra tackle during the season, he'd have something Matt Tobin doesn't: the ability to actually become a receiver, not just an eligible one. 

8. Robinson, who is getting run at corner with the first team, won a jump ball with Dorial Green-Beckham on a deep ball. It was an impressive play by Robinson, but DGB mistimed his jump. 

The best defensive play of the day came from Najee Goode in 7-on-7s. The veteran backup linebacker and special teamer dropped back and dove backward to break up a pass off the hand of Nick Foles. 

9. Obviously, there's no hitting yet, but Derek Barnett had a good first day going against the vets. Sure, Lane Johnson completely shut him down on one play, but Barnett showed off a variety of moves. 

10. The Eagles' two rookie receivers worked with the third team on Tuesday, while DGB and Nelson Agholor worked with the twos. Shelton Gibson showed off his quickness and Mack Hollins' size and speed combo wasn't any less impressive. Also, Hollins wasn't wearing gloves, but it didn't seem to affect his ability to catch. 

Stupid observation of the day: Thanks to his afro and thick beard, Seumalo kind of looks like a lion with a mane. 

The NFL shortened overtime to 10 minutes and people want to make sure Donovan McNabb knows

The NFL shortened overtime to 10 minutes and people want to make sure Donovan McNabb knows

First reported by ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the NFL owners have voted today to shorten overtime from 15 minutes to 10 minutes as a move to reduce playing time to aid in player safety.

People on Twitter wanted to make sure Donovan McNabb knows about the change.


Although nearly nine years have passed since the Eagles and Bengals played to a 13-13 tie, it seems the former Eagles' QB still hasn't lived down the fact that he didn't know that could happen in the NFL.

"I've never been a part of a tie," McNabb said after the game ended. "I never even knew that was in the rule book."

McNabb wasn't alone, as several other of his teammates, including DeSean Jackson and Correll Buckhalter also did not know the game could end in a tie.

Now, more games will likely end in a tie and fans probably won't ever let McNabb forget it.