The Flyers and Their ‘Insane’ Mark Streit Deal Are Stuck in Limbo

The Flyers and Their ‘Insane’ Mark Streit Deal Are Stuck in Limbo

Let me see if I’ve got this story straight.

  • The Flyers have reportedly agreed in principle to a four-year contract worth $21 million with 35-year-old defenseman Mark Streit (more on that later, stay with me on this), a report which general manager Paul Holmgren denies.
  • Holmgren’s denial could have something to do with the fact that the Flyers cannot actually sign Streit to said contract until they’ve cleared some payroll because doing so would put them over the salary cap.
  • However, the club cannot exercise compliance buyouts until two days after the Stanley Cup Finals end, so they must wait until then to rid themselves of Danny Briere’s $6.5 million cap hit – and if they wish to free up Ilya Bryzgalov’s $5.67 million figure as well while they’re at it, the Flyers need to have a trade in place for another goaltender.
  • Once all of those steps are completed, the front office will have the freedom to do important things like sign certain players whose rights they recently traded for, and even extend qualifying offers to their own restricted free agents.

That’s not convoluted at all. Such is life for teams that constantly operate within a couple cents of the salary cap every year, and that cap suddenly dips 9% in one offseason – a problem that Flyers are probably further exacerbating with this Streit deal.

The main gripe here is the length. The money is the money because the reality is teams are often forced to overpay when they go about filling major needs through free agency. Streit will be 39 when his term is finally wrapping up though, and because it’s a 35-plus contract, he counts against the cap no matter what as I am sure we are all well aware.

Even three years was pushing it, but could be justified as meeting halfway – he improves the defense immediately, Kimmo Timonen coming off the books next summer pays for year two, and the third year is thank you pay. Unless Streit holds up well, the farewell tour could get ugly.

Streit has been durable, playing every regular season game in three of the last four seasons. He also has only played seven seasons logged in the NHL, so therefore doesn’t have quite the wear and tear as many players his age. His style of play is not as physical, either, which could also prolong his longevity.

Still, four years. I would have preferred they pay more than $5.25 per and get him for less time if at all possible. Harrison Mooney at Puck Daddy describes the entire package as an “incredible overpayment” and “batcrap insane.” There are no doubt many in Philadelphia who would agree.

>> Sources: Flyers agree to four-year deal with Streit [CSN]
>> For now, Flyers limited in offseason options [Courier-Post]

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.