Flyers open road trip with ugly loss to Leafs


Flyers open road trip with ugly loss to Leafs


TORONTO – All it took to burst the Flyers’ bubble for a strong road trip start was 6 minutes, 15 seconds.

That critical, second period juncture Monday night at Air Canada Centre saw the Maple Leafs turn a tie game into an ugly 5-2 trouncing, as the Flyers' horrific road play continued.
“It’s not the chances, we had chances for sure,” said Flyer captain Claude Giroux of 46 shots.
“That six minutes in the second period killed us. That hurts. We were playing well. We have to learn from this and not back down.”
Three Leafs goals did the trick as Peter Laviolette’s club dropped to 1-6-0 on the road.
“There was room for simpler ideas at that point,” Laviolette said of the six-minute disaster where the Leafs had the Flyers pinned in their own end with mistakes.
“They’ve hurt us in the past and hurt is in the span of six minutes. It’s tough. The first one goes in, we shot ourselves in the foot, and then it unravels for five minutes.”
The six-game trip continues Tuesday night in Winnipeg.
“We gave them those turnovers,” Kimmo Timonen said of the middle stanza. “Sometimes you have to play a simple game and we didn’t do that.”
Timonen said the club’s road woes comes down to “individual preparation.”
“Doesn’t matter if you are home or away, you have to play consistent,” he said. “Once you come on the road you have to prepare yourself even more.
“There’s no fans behind you, no one cheering your name. That’s a learning process to me and it’s time to learn this right now.”

Starter Ilya Bryzgalov yielded four goals on just 14 shots before being replaced by Brian Boucher, who was hoping to make his first start against the Jets.
Bryz avoided the media by going out the rear door of the dressing room.
Not even a five-minute power play that same period could see the Flyers climb back; their continued lack of offense is alarming.
Oh yeah. James van Riemsdyk, in his first meeting against his former club, scored on a nice backhander against Boosh in the third period to really rub it in. How ironic that he moved right around Luke Schenn on the goal.
Usually, the Flyers give a pretty good effort. They needed a point in this one because there is no guarantee they’ll get one in The Peg, where they split the season series last year.
So, the seven points in four home games wasn’t a sign of what was to unfold here, after all.
“We need to find a way to be more consistent here and not have these highs and lows,” Nick Grossmann said. “We have to find ways to grind it out for 60 minutes.”
Laviolette wanted a strong start and he got it from the opening shift when Wayne Simmonds picked up his third goal at 38 seconds, rebounding a point drive from Schenn.
“After that goal, they were the better team – they were hungrier and when that happens, you create turnovers like they did in the second period,” Timonen said.
Bryzgalov got a ton of help later in the period when Mikhail Grabovski’s drive ripped off the cross bar and right post in a split-second.
No matter, the Leafs tied at 14:49 on Dion Phaneuf’s first point on home ice this season. Bryzgalov never saw his shot from the left point because Nikolai Kulemin was blocking his vision.
As usual, the Flyers had a couple of bad penalties at the end, and survived a 36-second 5-on-3 kill. Ironically, they also had the best chance shorthanded there, when it was 5-on-4 off the initial holding call against Zac Rinaldo.
Giroux, who was visibly angry after the game, stole a puck in the corner and fed Matt Read down the slot for what should have been an easy marker against goalie James Reimer.
Except Read’s initial shot sailed wide. The rebound came back to him. This time, Reimer made a sprawling left pad save.
The Flyers came out very lame in the second period and paid a steep price as Toronto scored twice in 28 seconds to take a 3-1 lead.
Colton Orr outworked Grossmann in the crease for the first goal at 2:05, but the fault lies in Tommy Sestito throwing the puck behind the net when he could have cleared it down the wall.
Then Matt Frattin got a short-side tip to make it 3-1 at 2:33. Laviolette called his timeout less than a minute later to settle things down.
Shortly before the four-minute mark, Reimer went down on the ice injured and had to be helped off. He was replaced by Ben Scrivens.
That didn’t help the Flyers at all because they again failed to clear the zone under Leafs pressure at 6:15 and paid the price on Clarke MacArthur’s wide-open one-timer from Nazem Kadri that blew the game apart.
Laviolette then yanked Bryzgalov, saying he wanted “a different change of direction in the game.”
“It’s six minutes you’d like to have back and do over,” Laviolette said.
As bad as that was, the Flyers had a real chance to get back into the game when Korbinian Holzer was ejected with a five-minute major on Tye McGinn at 13:31.
The Flyers completely squandered the resulting five-minute power play with six shots. Scrivens made a glove save on Brayden Schenn – the only decent shot he faced.
Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren, speaking on Toronto radio after that period, said his team lacked confidence with the puck that entire power play sequence.
“That [power play] could have changed the tide,” Simmonds said. “We had chances. Pucks laying around. Guys diving everywhere.
“You have scrambles and sometimes you get the benefit of the bounces and sometimes you don’t.
“We've got to be better on the power play. We got a lot of chances here to get back in games and put games away and we’re not doing it.”

Best of NHL: Canadiens rally past Lightning for 6th straight win

Best of NHL: Canadiens rally past Lightning for 6th straight win

MONTREAL -- Max Pacioretty scored the tiebreaking goal in Montreal's three-goal third period as the Canadiens beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 3-1 Thursday night for their sixth straight win.

Alex Galchenyuk and Torrey Mitchell also scored to help Montreal improve to 7-0-1. Carey Price made 29 saves to win for the fourth time in four starts this season.

Alex Killorn scored the lone goal for the Lightning, who lost against an Eastern-Conference opponent for the first time this season. Ben Bishop stopped 23 shots.

With the scored tied 1-1, Pacioretty got the go-ahead goal at 10:23 by beating Bishop glove-side. Blown coverage by the Lightning left the Canadiens' captain all alone on the edge of the face-off circle, and Bishop couldn't see the shot with Andrew Shaw posted firmly in front of goal.

Montreal remains the only NHL team still undefeated in regulation (see full recap).

Crosby's late goal gives Penguins win over Islanders
PITTSBURGH -- Sidney Crosby scored the tiebreaking goal late in the third period to lead the Pittsburgh Penguins to a 4-2 victory over the New York Islanders on Thursday night.

Patric Hornqvist, Evgeni Malkin and Phil Kessel also scored -- each getting his third of the season -- to help the Penguins win for the third time in four games and improve to 5-0-1 at home.

Crosby, playing for the second straight game after missing the first six with a concussion, scored with 2:25 left as he caught a pass from Scott Wilson at the top of the crease and quickly turned to his forehand to put the puck behind Islanders goalie Jaroslav Halak.

Kessel added a power-play goal to cap the scoring 32 seconds later.

Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 35 shots while starting for the eighth straight game.

Travis Hamonic and Shane Prince scored for the Islanders, and Halak finished with 31 saves (see full recap).

Streaking Red Wings win marathon shootout vs. Blues
ST. LOUIS -- Henrik Zetterberg scored in the eighth round of a shootout to give the Detroit Red Wings a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Thursday night.

Zetterberg's goal gave the Red Wings a six-game winning streak.

In the shootout, St. Louis' first shooter, Alexander Steen, scored but then Vladimir Tarasenko, Kevin Shattenkirk, David Perron, Nail Yakupoc, Robby Fabbri, Patrick Burgland and Dmitrjij Jaskin all came up short.

Gustav Nyquist scored on Detroit's second attempt but Frans Nielsen, Dylan Larkin, Andreas Athanasiou, Tomas Tatar, Riley Sheehan and Darren Helm all missed.

St. Louis had the better chances in overtime. Center Jaden Schwartz missed a wide-open net early in the extra session. Jori Lehtera was stopped on a breakaway midway through the period by Detroit goalie Petr Mrazek (see full recap).

Flyers Hall of Famers return to toast Ed Snider, 50th anniversary

Flyers Hall of Famers return to toast Ed Snider, 50th anniversary

There were times when Rod Brind’Amour didn’t quite feel like a part of the Flyers’ family anymore.

Following eight years rich with memories and victories in a Flyers' jersey, Brind’Amour, a beloved player who changed the franchise on and off the ice, was stunningly traded to the Hurricanes less than a month into the 1999-00 season.

He went on to win two Frank J. Selke trophies (NHL’s best defensive forward) and a Stanley Cup in Carolina before landing an assistant coaching job within the organization.

“You get traded, you automatically think, ‘Well, I’m not what I thought I was,’” Brind’Amour said. “But that wasn’t the case.”

Especially once his phone rang and it was Ed Snider on the other line.

“I got a great phone call before Mr. Snider passed and him telling me what he thought I meant to this team,” Brind’Amour said. “That meant a lot. I really feel connected to the Flyers’ organization again and I’ll take any chance I can to get back and be a part of it.”

A year after being inducted in the Flyers’ Hall of Fame, he was among the orange and black greats on Thursday night at the Wells Fargo Center to toast the team’s 50th anniversary with Flyers Heritage Night. Snider, the Flyers’ fearless and compassionate founder who died in April, would have been all smiles as a pregame ceremony at center ice honored the legends that played a role in fulfilling his vision.

Fourteen Flyers Hall of Famers were on hand as Bill Barber, Brind’Amour, Bob Clarke, Ron Hextall, Mark Howe, John LeClair, Reggie Leach, Eric Lindros, Bernie Parent, Brian Propp, Dave Poulin, Dave Schultz, Joe Watson and Jim Watson came out one by one. Family members of Snider, Gene Hart, Barry Ashbee, Rick MacLeish, Keith Allen and Joe Scott were also present.

The evening was all about family, just like Snider.

Poulin, who captained the Flyers for parts of six seasons (1984-90) and two Stanley Cup Final appearances (1985, 1987), said these are can’t-miss events to reminisce and remember.

“There’s a lot of demands on your time, a lot of different things, it’s busy for everybody and everybody’s got different things going on in their life, but when this call comes in from Brad Marsh (former Flyers player, team’s current director of community development), you’re marking it on the calendar and you’re coming,” Poulin said during the first intermission of the Flyers’ 5-4 loss to the Coyotes (see Instant Replay). “This is pretty special to be out there with this group tonight.”

Since retiring, Poulin, a 1986-87 Selke winner with the Flyers and two-time NHL All-Star, has coached, worked in front-office roles and is now an analyst for TSN. He’s always around hockey and talking hockey.

Outsiders frequently mention the Flyers, one reason why Poulin calls the organization “unique.”

“Still to this day, I have conversations with people that played a long time in the NHL that are incredibly envious of the Flyers,” Poulin said. “I had one as recently as Monday night. I was at a book signing for Darryl Sittler, who has a new book out, and we were teammates here. And I had a great conversation with Syl Apps Jr., who was an original Pittsburgh Penguin. And the first thing he wanted to say was, ‘What about those Flyers, what about that Philadelphia, what about that?’ Guys that never experienced it from the inside were always envious of what they saw, and to a man.”

Poulin said that’s a testament to Snider.

“It was Ed Snider, it was the continuity of a leader that through 50 years — which is unheard of in any industry, any business, let alone a professional sports team — kept it like it was,” he said. “And then everybody assimilated into that. Everybody became a part of it, everybody understood the importance of it.”

During the tribute, Brind’Amour gave Lindros a big hug, to the surprise of many.

“I haven’t seen him in forever,” Brind’Amour said. “It was just fun, when we got out there we just said, ‘It’s nice to be back on the ice again.’ It’s been a long time, I haven’t seen him. I saw [LeClair] last year obviously. But it’s just nice to catch up with these guys and relive some stories. We had a lot of great times, it was nice to see [Lindros].”

Brind’Amour was asked how so many former Flyers from different eras, with families and separate agendas, make such reunions possible.

He found his answer before the question even finished.

“It’s Philadelphia,” he said. “This means a lot to me. To be honest with you, I was out of it, I was doing my own thing and last year, when they did that whole ceremony for me, it just kind of brought me into the fold, that this is important and that they really did appreciate what I did here.”

And Snider, never forgetting any, made that clear with a phone call.

“I think there was a time there where I just didn’t really think that was the case, so it’s meant a lot to me to be back here and be in the fold,” Brind’Amour said. “I love the alumni. … Any chance to get to reconnect with these guys, it just means the world to me.”