Flyers suffer big letdown in loss to Panthers

slideshow-022113-flyers-bryzgalov-uspresswire.jpg

Flyers suffer big letdown in loss to Panthers

BOX SCORE

You sensed this would happen. Past history suggested it was a real possibility.

The Flyers had played an emotional, leave-it-all-on-the-ice game against the Pittsburgh Penguins. They won in the final 1:31 when every player was spent.

Return home to Wells Fargo Center for Thursday’s back end of a back-to-back against the struggling Florida Panthers.

And …

“We all knew it was going to be a challenge,” Mike Knuble said. “And quite frankly, in the first 5-6 minutes, it was obvious we weren’t up for it and it cost us the game.”

It wasn’t so much the Flyers weren’t skating. It was a series of turnovers and sloppy defensive play that killed them in the opening period of a 5-2 spanking.

“I don’t usually make excuses; I’m usually straight-forward,” Kimmo Timonen said. “You saw a tired Flyers team today.

“Coming back from six-game road trip and play a really hard-charged game yesterday, get back at 2 a.m. We were tired.”

Before the game, coach Peter Laviolette addressed the letdown scenario with his team.

“We talked about positive things as opposed to negative things,” Laviolette said. “It’s a big game for our team. We want to make this game mean something. It’s an opportunity to get back to a starting point.

“We’ve been sub par the entire season so far and I think the guys recognize that. It’s been a … very tough ride with regard to a lot of things. Tonight is a chance to get back and take a quick breath.”

So much was riding on this. The first of five straight home games against lesser Eastern Conference opponents when the Flyers could fatten up on points get themselves into playoff position.

They could have reached .500 with this one win.

Gone. They are now 4-8 in back-to-backs and 2-4 in the second game.

“It is what it is, the schedule and games last night was hard fought and we came back. You want to prepare and put yourselves in position to win a hockey game,” Laviolette said.

“It was an important game tonight. It was evident in the first 10 minutes we weren’t as sharp, weren’t as crisp at last night … We didn’t make a lot of mistakes but the ones we made were point blank.”

Ilya Bryzgalov was very mediocre, giving up four goals on just 15 shots. He was yanked for Brian Boucher in the second period.

Take away a couple turnovers and the Flyers trail 1-0 after the first intermission instead of 3-0.

“It’s a frustrating one, a tough one to lose after all the effort we put in yesterday, all the battling we did, everything we fought for yesterday,” Danny Briere said.

“To come out today and have a game like this, we talked about coming out strong and playing hard.

“It was mental mistakes that did us in. We were trying to play hard … It’s mental mistakes that cost us. The first three chances to score, they scored.”

Florida’s first two goals were 29 seconds apart. Peter Mueller, working hard to get open in the slot, measured Bryzgalov and beat him at 8:15.

On the next goal, the Flyers botched an attempted pass through the neutral zone and it was picked off by Mike Weaver, who quickly fed Tomas Kopecky for a snap wrister to make it 2-0.

Laviolette immediately called his timeout. That trick worked in Pittsburgh -- as it often does. Not this time.

Barely two minutes later, Luke Schenn’s point shot was blocked by Panther rookie Jonathan Huberdeau, who raced up the ice so quickly that Timonen had no choice but to haul him down.

Penalty shot. Good call.

You know how Bryzgalov handles shootouts. Penalty shots -- same thing. Huberdeau came down the slot slowly, turned his body to the right, then backhanded the puck through the five-hole. Easily.

It was 3-0 and the Flyers were cooked.

“I’ve seen this happen a million times in my life,” Timonen said. “You’re coming back from a road trip, the hardest game is the next home game. It proves it’s mentally tough. We had a bad sleep last night.

“When you are mentally tired, you are not 100 percent into the game. You make easy mental mistakes and usually those things end up in the back of your net.”

Harry Zolnierczyk nearly got one back near the end of the period. Early in the second period, Sean Couturier had a partial breakaway and slid a backhander wide of the open side. Could have been 3-2 “if” they score.

Before the second period ended, Huberdeau tipped one past Bryzgalov. He leads the Panthers with eight goals (five in five games). That brought Boucher into the game.

“He’s very skilled, very slick,” Briere said of Huberdeau. “Offensively, he’s a very dangerous players. Pretty impressive for his first year in the league. I thought he showed a lot of poise with the puck.”

The lone bright spot? Jakub Voracek picked up another goal late in the final period on a wrap around. He has seven goals and a team-high 19 points.

“We have to learn from this -- every game matters. We’re not 10-0,” Timonen said. “Every game matters and we’re fighting for a playoff spot. These games matter.”

Flyers ramp up intensity, physicality on Day 2 of training camp

Flyers ramp up intensity, physicality on Day 2 of training camp

VOORHEES, N.J. — Radko Gudas was so hyped up, he was having great difficulty trying to communicate his excitement after having crunched two players during battle drills.
 
“This is the fun where it starts … where the fun starts?” he said with a laugh. “Everybody wants to get the feeling of game-like situations. Everybody is trying their hardest.”
 
After two days of mostly drills with gradually advancing intensity, the Flyers wrapped up Saturday’s training camp with two-on-two battle drills.
 
Two guys going to the net and shooting, getting the rebound, all the while fighting off another player.
 
Gudas wants to demonstrate he can still maim guys along the boards with a taped-up right wrist (stress fracture). And he did.
 
“I haven’t used the wrist for a couple weeks so it’s nice to get a touch with somebody else and get into the battle situation with someone else and know I can still do it,” he said.
 
“This is more for the older guys who weren’t here for the rookie [camp] to get in there, get a feel for it.”
 
All this aside, Gudas might not participate in Sunday’s full squad scrimmage only because he has not been cleared to shoot pucks yet.
 
“I have to stay as much as I can off the heavy slapper,” he said.
 
The Flyers have two split-squad games Monday — one in New Jersey, the other in Brooklyn.
 
“The guys are anxious to have a scrimmage,” coach Dave Hakstol said. “Couple good, hard workdays and they handled it really well. It’s time to get into a scrimmage situation, which leads into a game the next day.”
 
Hence the battle drills to get players to take their energy to that next level.
 
“You got to slowly keep moving toward game readiness,” Hakstol said. “There’s a difference from practice to a full preseason game.
 
“Today was a little more battle in practice than yesterday but some subtle detail mixed into each of the drills.”

Broadcast notes
Monday's game in New Jersey will be broadcast on radio on 97.5 The Fanatic, while the Islanders' game is slated to be a video webcast on PhiladelphiaFlyers.com.

Tuesday's game against the Islanders at the Wells Fargo Center and Wednesday's game against the Devils in Allentown, Pennsylvania, will both air on TCN and 97.5.

Brayden Schenn motivated to build off career season in 2016-17

Brayden Schenn motivated to build off career season in 2016-17

VOORHEES, N.J. — What a difference for Brayden Schenn to walk into Flyers training camp and feel as if he’s arrived.
 
The forward is coming off a season in which he posted career-highs in goals (26), assists (33) and points (59), which earned him the team’s Pelle Lindbergh Memorial Trophy as the most improved Flyer. 
 
Best of all, he was rewarded with a four-year, $20.5 million contract in July.
 
“I feel good coming into this year,” Schenn said. “The Flyers showed some trust and confidence in me by signing me for four years. Coming in here, I’m excited to get the season going and build off last year.”
 
At least he won’t have to begin camp on the fifth line like he did last fall after general manager Ron Hextall had challenged him to take his game to another level and new head coach Dave Hakstol made him work to advance himself in the lineup.
 
“You hope it won’t be like that [fifth line], especially with [seven] guys gone,” Schenn said jokingly, meaning the Flyers playing in the World Cup of Hockey.
 
The big question for Schenn is whether he plays left wing on Claude Giroux’s line or plays wing on Sean Couturier's unit. He proved to everyone last season he can play all three forward spots now and be effective on the ice.
 
“I finished on the left,” he said. “I said forward or center but I played so much left wing, right wing a little center in the playoffs. So I feel comfortable now all over.
 
“Wherever the opportunity is to play with great players and make the most of the situation is where you want to be right now.”
 
These first two days of camp, Schenn has been very aggressive and motivated on the ice.
 
Schenn, Giroux and Wayne Simmonds represented the top line much of last season, especially in the second half. That was partly because Jakub Voracek had slumped so badly from his breakout season the year before and couldn’t hold his spot on the first line.
 
“It’s tough to say because lines change throughout the year,” Schenn said. “When you are trying to find chemistry and this and that. Wherever I start, I just have to make the most of every opportunity.
 
“We have a lot of top players around here to play with … to pencil my name into one spot is hard to say. Wherever they place me at the start, I’ll to try with it.”
 
It’s expected he’ll start the season again at left wing on Giroux’s line after he serves his three-game suspension for a hit against Capitals forward T.J. Oshie in the playoffs.
 
“It’s good to have guys who can move around because you never know what you are gonna need in a top six,” Hextall said. “You like a left-hand Brayden on the left side with skill.”
 
Hakstol said he wants guys “who fit well” together, so that may be the answer right there.
 
There was talk last season whether the Schenn Brothers were having negative impacts on each other. Luke Schenn, the veteran defenseman, came to camp and was demoted to eighth on the depth chart. He was angry from Day 1. Brayden Schenn was angry at the fifth line.
 
Both would huddle with each other every day. Both cared so deeply about the other, they acted as each’s confidante. Yet when Luke Schenn was traded, it seemed to benefit both players.
 
“Probably a better question for Brayden, but a lot of people have pointed to that,” Hextall said. “When Luke got traded, Brayden had played six or seven really good games ahead of that.
 
“Whether that was coincidence or not I don’t have an answer. I do think what he said there, there’s obvious reason based on personality and it probably could do you good or do you harm.”
 
Brayden Schenn said he always dreamed of playing with his brother, but it adds other pressures.
 
“When you come to the rink [as brothers], you are so tight and so close, you tend to worry about each other more than you have to, just because it’s family and he’s your brother,” he said.
 
“Now that Luke’s gone, he’s in a good situation in Arizona, I hope he gets a good opportunity. Now you tend to worry about yourself a little more. Come to the rink and focus on what you have to do and not to worry about Luke or vice-versa.”
 
Schenn said it’s obvious that the club has made a commitment to himself, Giroux, Simmonds, Couturier and Voracek with the long-term contracts handed out in recent years.
 
To that end, he said, the window of opportunity for some of these Flyers is fast approaching. Some are in their peak years now. Schenn, 25, and Couturier, 23, are the youngest among that group.
 
“They will challenge us again this year to get better,” Schenn said. “They have invested in us. We all got to step up. Parts on the back end like 'Ghost' [Shayne Gostisbehere] and Gudy [Radko Gudas]. Everyone has got to get better year by year.
 
“I hate to say it. We’re not old by any means, but our core group of guys are in their prime now and we have to try to make it happen.”
 
It starts in training camp.