ANNIHILATED: Broncos humiliate Eagles 52-20 in Denver

ANNIHILATED: Broncos humiliate Eagles 52-20 in Denver

Well, we told you there was a chance to win. Actually, I said it, and I stand by it. I also said what actually wound up happening—an embarrassing 52-20 loss—would not surprise anyone either.

The Denver Broncos are an amazing football team, which should be fairly obvious to everybody by now. The next defense that figures out how to stop Peyton Manning and all those weapons will be the first, and there might not be a first this season. They may very well be that good.

Manning completed 28 of 34 passes for 327 yards and four touchdowns—no interceptions. Demaryius Thomas and Wes Welker each caught two touchdown passes, and Knowshon Moreno picked up 78 yards on the ground and a score.

Okay, the Birds’ defense is not very good, which we knew going in. However, that doesn’t explain why Michael Vick could only lead the Eagles to 13 points in Chip Kelly’s offense, nor does it explain how that same offense was outscored by the Broncos’ special teams 14-13.

Vick started off sharp, but only wound up connecting on 14 of 27 pass attempts for 248 yards—no touchdowns, no picks. The four-time Pro Bowler added 41 yards on the ground to go with LeSean McCoy's 73, although the shifty back was in and out of the lineup with minor injuries throughout the game.

The Broncos also scored touchdowns on a kick return and a blocked punt, so we're not leaving special teams out of this debacle either.

This was an absolute beatdown in every phase of the game. Both teams had their backup quarterbacks into the game midway through the fourth quarter, which is about as bad as it gets in the NFL.

I imagine there are a lot of angry Philadelphians right now, even among those who felt the team didn't have a prayer on Sunday to begin with. We’ll be going more in-depth into the Eagles’ many, many problems in the coming days, but right now we’re still venting.

Expected or unexpected, this was brutal to watch, and trust me when I say it will be even more difficult to watch again and sort through the details later.

Hey, at least the Eagles are amazingly only one game out of first place in the NFC East.

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

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The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.