Do Eagles Have a Leg Up on Burress?

Do Eagles Have a Leg Up on Burress?

The big story in Birds-land over the weekend actually came out of New York on Saturday. Gary Myers wrote a feature for the New York Daily News about currently incarcerated, former-Giants WR Plaxico Burress, and his impending release from prison. Burress has been out of football since November '08 after accidentally shooting himself in the leg at a nightclub, but he is eyeing a return to the gridiron this year.

Which wasn't exactly news--Burress has always maintained he would play again. The interesting part, according to Myers' article, is whenever the 6-5, 232 lbs. wide receiver begins selling his services, the Eagles supposedly will be "first in line" to see what he's all about.

Let's face it, much of this idea is predicated on the Michael Vick signing in '09, and Myers makes no bones about it.

"Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie and coach Andy Reid, having already been through the post-prison experience with Vick, might be in a better position to handle any public backlash about adding another former inmate. They could also help Burress with his transition back to the NFL."

Personally, I find the assertion that because Vick has been a success story, the Eagles are suddenly lining up to sign ex-convicts is thin at best, and really quite ridiculous.

Vick's was a unique situation. He had Donovan McNabb lobbying for him, and here for a season to act as a mentor. More important, the front office was willing to take a chance in part because, at age 29, Vick still had upside. He's the starting quarterback now, but many observers thought the franchise would attempt to rehab his image for one season before attempting a trade. However, there surprisingly was no market last off-season, and the rest is history.

Plaxico's only upside is he may have a season or two of quality ball left, which is reason enough for management to perform their due dilligence. Look at it from the team's standpoint though. The Eagles don't need another wide receiver, and turning 34 years old this August, Burress has no future trade value. Not only that, his arrival means one less roster spot for a younger player, and he could potentially block a prospect such as Riley Cooper from seeing meaningful playing time.

Which is not to say I'm entirely against the possibility of adding Burress. He was one of the true difference makers at receiver right up until and through his final injury-plagued season. He caught 22 touchdown passes between 06-07, and has four 1,000 yard seasons in his nine year NFL career. The numbers don't even entirely do Burress justice, as his size created difficult match-up problems for defenses on a weekly basis.

With the Eagles, I could see him playing a small role, particularly inside the red zone where bigger targets become even greater assets in the passing game. Where else can you really see him having an impact though? DeSean Jackson and Jeremy Maclin obviously aren't coming off the field very much, and Jason Avant has been one of the club's most reliable receivers from the slot.

In the end, the only way this works is if a number of egos could be kept in check, first and foremost being Plaxico's. Would Burress accept a reduced role, and presumably less money, while he worked his way back into the league?

Because much of the premise is based on the Vick and Burress situations being somehow similar, when they are not really at all. Vick was far more untouchable coming out of prison. Besides the horrific nature of a criminal past that inflamed activists, he was seen as an athlete who never took his profession seriously. With the exception of the part where Burress shoots himself, which is almost humorous anyway, football fans have long since been desensitized to athletes who own weapons.

The list of teams who are willing to take a shot at Plaxico (get it?) will be slightly longer than those who would merely consider bringing Vick into the fold two years ago, and certainly more receiver-needy. The Eagles have surprised plenty of times before, so you can never rule it out completely, but it's difficult to envision them as one of the first into the fray here, as the report suggests.

>> Former Giants WR Plaxico Burress out of lockup on June 6 [NY Daily News]

Temple at No. 19 Navy: Owls go for first AAC title

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Temple at No. 19 Navy: Owls go for first AAC title

Temple (9-3) at No. 19 Navy (9-2)
Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
Saturday, noon, ABC

It would have been hard to picture Temple in the American Athletic Conference championship game after the Owls’ first game of the season, a 28-13 loss to Army.

But that’s exactly where they are three months later, as Temple will take on No. 19 Navy in the conference championship game Saturday.

The Owls and Midshipmen have both been handling opponents as of late. Temple’s won its last four games by at least three touchdowns, while Navy has outscored opponents 141-62 in its past two games.

Let’s take a look at how one of the country’s top offenses and one of the country’s top defenses match up.

Scouting Temple
The Owls' defense seems to get better every week. Temple ranks No. 3 in the Football Bowl Subdivision in total defense and No. 10 in scoring defense. The only two teams that rank higher than the Owls in both categories are Alabama and Michigan.

Teams haven’t scored more than 13 points against the Owls in their last four games, and Temple is outscoring opponents 123-23 during that stretch.

Redshirt-senior defensive lineman Haason Reddick was named a first team all-conference selection earlier this week. He leads the FBS in tackles for loss. Redshirt-senior Praise Martin-Oguike is coming off one of his best games of the season last week against East Carolina, in which he had two sacks, including a forced fumble. He has seven sacks this season.

On offense, Temple’s goal this week will be to sustain drives and keep Navy’s offense off the field. The Owls are currently No. 5 in the FBS in time of possession, holding the ball for more than 34 minutes per game.

Earlier in the week, coach Matt Rhule said senior quarterback Phillip Walker was questionable for Saturday’s game. Walker will likely play, but the Owls might be without one of their top offensive weapons.

Rhule said sophomore running back Ryquell Armstead is doubtful. Armstead has 842 yards and 13 touchdowns this season.

Scouting Navy
The Midshipmen have one of the simplest — yet at that same time one of the best — offenses in the country. Navy ranks No. 2 in rushing yards at 342 yards per game.

Quarterback Will Worth runs the triple option for Navy. He has 2,544 total yards of offense and 33 total touchdowns. He’s passed for 1,363 yards and rushed for 1,181 more.  Worth has a touchdown in 11 straight games.

Worth has attempted 258 rushes compared to 115 passing attempts. Four other Navy players have at least 40 rushing attempts this season.

Senior wide receiver Jamir Tillman is the Midshipmen’s best receiving threat. The 6-foot-4 wideout has 32 catches for 533 yards and two touchdowns.

Navy’s defense hasn’t been quite as elite as its offense. The Midshipmen have allowed 30 or more points in four of their last five games.

The Midshipmen are allowing 265 passing yards per game. Opposing quarterbacks have averaged 313 yards and three touchdowns in their last three contests.

Storyline to watch: Can Temple find a way to stop the triple option?
The last time these two teams played was in 2014, when Navy ran for 487 yards and four touchdowns in a 31-24 win against the Owls at Lincoln Financial Field. Temple’s most recent matchup against the triple option was when it lost to Army in its season opener. The Black Knights ran for 329 yards and four touchdowns. With only a week to prepare, Temple will have to find a way to cure its option woes if it wants a chance to win Saturday.

What’s at stake?
The Owls have only won one other conference championship in program history, when they won the Mid-Atlantic Conference in 1967. A win would also give Temple its third 10-win season in program history. If Western Michigan loses Friday night, Temple also puts itself in contention for a spot in the Cotton Bowl with a win.

Prediction
Temple has to figure out this option thing at some point, right? The Owls’ ability to convert on third down and sustain long drives will help slow Navy's offense. This one will most likely come down to who has the ball last, but the Owls are a little bit more well-rounded, so they get the edge. Temple 31, Navy 28