Do You Prefer an Offensive- or Defensive-Minded Head Coach? Does It Even Matter?

Do You Prefer an Offensive- or Defensive-Minded Head Coach? Does It Even Matter?

One of the statements we keep reading and hearing as the
Eagles’ head-coaching search drags on is a seemingly large portion of the fan
base wants a “defensive-minded head coach.” Recently, some of my brethren were
having this discussion on Twitter, going so far as to break down how many of
each won Super Bowls in the past decade.

It’s an interesting topic, in that obviously it can be
debated and almost quantified to a certain extent. But then ultimately, does it
really make a difference either way?

This is an aspect of the Eagles’ hunt that does not
preoccupy me in the least, because think about it. An offensive-minded head
coach is going to hire a defensive coordinator to run his defense, and a
defensive-minded head coach is going to hire an offensive coordinator to run
his offense.

What you’re essentially doing is applying overriding
philosophies to candidates based on a position they currently hold.

Bringing in a defensive coordinator to become the Eagles’ next
head coach does not automatically mean Jeff Lurie would be hiring somebody who
believes in a three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust run-oriented attack. For all we
know, that particular defensive coach is going to want a strong-minded offensive
coordinator who will throw the ball all over the field on first, second, and third
downs because of some league trend. What is being done on the other side of the ball may even boil down to
something so simple as who was willing to take the job.

It has a tendency not to work out how you think it will
at all.

Perhaps the prime example is Brian Billick, who won a
championship as head coach of the Baltimore Ravens in 2000. Because that team
had one of the worst offenses in Super Bowl history, but also one of the strongest defenses ever, people tend to forget
Billick actually got the job based on his work as the offensive coordinator for the
Minnesota Vikings.

Or look at last year’s Super Bowl. Bill Belichick was once a
defensive coach, but the Patriots have developed into an offensive powerhouse through
the years, while Tom Coughlin was an offensive coach, and the Giants’ pass rush
especially is often billed first for their success.

The Eagles shouldn’t be looking for somebody based on
whether he coaches offense or defense, because somebody winds up coaching
offense, and somebody else winds up coaching defense, and vice versa. It simply
isn’t something to get hung up about.

What they’re looking for is a coach who can lead a team, a
coach with a plan. Do you really care whether it’s an offensive or defensive

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Jimmy Fallon gives out superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players

Jimmy Fallon gives out superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players

Jimmy Fallon, the host of the Tonight Show, handed out his superlatives to Eagles and Cowboys players. 

Linebacker Jordan Hicks was named “the most likely to be one of the Rugrats all grown up,” and safety Rodney McLeod was named “most likely to have been told he’d get a lollipop after the photo was taken.”

Unfortunately, there was not a superlative given to Tony Romo for being named mostly likely to be crying on the ground after getting sacked. 

The Eagles and Cowboys will face off on Sunday Night Football, when we will see the first battle between rookie quarterbacks Carson Wentz and Dak Prescott.

Check out the video for yourself right here.

Phillies fans woke up Rays' players during 2008 World Series

Phillies fans woke up Rays' players during 2008 World Series

The lore of Philly sports fans continue to grow. 

And this time, nothing was thrown.

Current Cubs and former Rays manager Joe Maddon said that during the 2008 World Series, Phillies fans found the hotel his team was staying at, and honked car horns throughout the night, keeping the team up.

"The Philly fans, they knew we were there somehow," Maddon told reporters Wednesday. "Five o’clock in the morning they’re driving around the hotel blowing the horn, trying to wake everybody up at 5:00 in the morning, 6:00 in the morning…."

Maddon says the team had already checked out of their original hotel before Game 5, but because the game was suspended, the Rays had to book another hotel in the area.

Through some impressive detective work, fans found the team's hotel and did their best to wake up the Rays throughout the early morning.

Did it work?

It must have, because the Rays allowed a leadoff double to Geoff Jenkins (remember that guy?) to resume the game.

You have to be pretty exhausted to allow a hit to that guy.