Donovan McNabb Is Too Cool for School

Donovan McNabb Is Too Cool for School

Ordinarily, I don't weigh in too heavy on our old friend Donovan anymore. As some readers have astutely pointed out, he's gone, out of our lives forever. However, this story from last week was a little too juicy to simply ignore, and just maybe serves as a glimpse into what's gone wrong for the former Eagles quarterback.

Per PFT, a talk radio show in D.C. citing unnamed sources claimed last Thursday that McNabb refused to wear a wristband with the plays on it, allegedly because he was afraid it would hurt his image. As incredibly ridiculous as that may sound (or not I guess), Donovan has yet to deny the story, and Rex Grossman has since all but confirmed it.

“Obviously Donovan didn’t like it.  He didn’t want to do it,” Grossman said.  “I’m not sure that was a major issue.  I’m not sure that was a big problem between him and the coaching staff.”
Wristbands are a fairly common device for quarterbacks. Through a little independent research, I noticed Mike Vick wearing one last season. So did Kevin Kolb. Hell, Tom Brady wears one. And while Donovan has not worn one for much of, or any of his NFL career, he certainly had them at Syracuse before the Eagles made him the second overall pick in the draft.

Whatever the reason is for not wearing one now, it's stupid. The wristband is only there to help, so there really is no excuse for making a big deal over it. If it's a way to show displeasure with the coaching staff, there are other ways he could demonstrate that. If it's about his image, well, I'm pretty sure his play this past year did enough damage in that department.

And Donovan better get with the program soon, that is if he intends to play again in 2011. The idea has been floated that we may have seen the last of McNabb. He'll likely demand a contract that far exceeds his value at this stage of his career, which is one of a temporary solution under center. Forget image, he'll have to swallow his pride the next time he puts his name on the dotted line.

Even then, the fact of the matter is once he gets to Minnesota, or wherever the coaches want to bring their franchise QB along slowly, the expectation would likely be--get ready for it--he wear a friggin wristband. McNabb is not the offensive wizard he seems to think he is, and with a shortened off-season to get up to speed in another new offense, the wristband may become a necessity.

Honestly, I never thought I'd feel this way, but thankfully he's not our problem anymore. McNabb was a very good quarterback here for a long time, and he helped carry this fanbase to some awesome highs. Nobody is dismissing his accomplishments.

What's sadly become apparent though, and more than ever since his departure, is this attitude as if he feels he's better than he really is. But Donovan McNabb is not above being traded, not above ending his career as a journeyman, and he's not above wearing a damn wrist band. At least he shouldn't be if he wants to still be taken seriously.

>> Report: McNabb refused to wear a wristband with plays [PFT]
>> Grossman says, what else, he should be starter [Washington Examiner]
>> Mosher: All signs pointing to end of McNabb's career [News Journal]

Savon Goodman transfers to La Salle for 2016-17 season

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USA Today Images

Savon Goodman transfers to La Salle for 2016-17 season

Forward Savon Goodman has enrolled in graduate classes at La Salle and will play the 2016-17 season with the Explorers.

“Savon is the perfect addition to our team next year,” La Salle head coach Dr. John Giannini said. “He shoots a great percentage and rebounds and defends with a tough, athletic style of play. He was a key part of an Arizona State NIT team and has had big games against great competition.”

Goodman, a Philadelphia native, graduated from Arizona State and is not subject to transfer rules. 

Goodman averaged 9.6 points and 6.4 rebounds per game in 28 contests as a junior in 2015-16. He shot 55 percent from the field overall.

In leading Constitution High School to the PIAA State Championship as well as the Philadelphia Public League title during his senior year, Goodman earned Public League MVP honors.

Jackie Robinson's historic Dodgers contract on display in Philadelphia

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Jackie Robinson's historic Dodgers contract on display in Philadelphia

A piece of modern baseball history will be on display in Philadelphia for the next couple of weeks.

The original contract Jackie Robinson signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in April 1947 that allowed him to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball will be featured at the National Constitution Center from May 26 until June 5.

Mikalai Kontilia, CEO of Collectors Cafe, the company loaning the contract to the Constitution Center, brought both the Dodgers' document and the contract Robinson signed with the minor league Montreal Royals in October 1945 to The Comcast Network's Breakfast on Broad show on Tuesday morning.

"What's amazing is, these contracts, finally, after 60-some odd years, have been unearthed, discovered and the American people can finally see the Jackie Robinson contracts," Kontilia said.

The Dodgers' contract plays an important role in American history, and not just in terms of sport. Many people point to then-Dodgers owner Branch Rickey's signing Robinson as a starting point in the American civil rights movement.

Kontilia said a historic documentarian appraised the contracts at a value of $36 million.

For more on the contracts, check out the segment from Breakfast on Broad.

Photo credit of Robinson signing contract: DodgersNation.com.

Jim Schwartz on missing Fletcher Cox: 'He’ll catch up'

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Jim Schwartz on missing Fletcher Cox: 'He’ll catch up'

As the Eagles kicked off their second round of voluntary OTAs on Tuesday morning at the NovaCare Complex, the team’s best player was still MIA.
 
Defensive tackle Fletcher Cox is staying away from the team as he awaits a long-term contract extension for big money. He hasn’t been at any of the team’s voluntary workouts this spring and the first mandatory date isn’t until June 7.
 
As the Eagles install a new defense, how much is Cox missing?
 
“It’s voluntary, so you can only do so much,” defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz said on Tuesday afternoon in a near-30-minute press conference. “Fletch was drafted in a scheme similar to this. He’ll catch up. But I’m sure there will be some carryover for him. I assume he’s a fast learner and I assume he’ll pick things up quickly.”
 
Without Cox on Tuesday, veteran free agent pickup Mike Martin worked with the first-team defense at tackle next to Bennie Logan. Last week, at the first open OTA practice, Taylor Hart filled in for Cox.
 
When asked if he has spoken with Cox since taking the job, Schwartz declined to comment, saying he prefers to keep private conversations with players private.
 
And by the third consecutive Cox question – this one about how Cox will eventually fit into his defense – the veteran NFL coach was ready to move on.
 
“Why don’t we do this: that’s probably enough Fletcher Cox speak,” Schwartz said. “Let’s just talk about the guys that are here. I really can’t comment on the guys that aren’t here. I haven’t had any experience with those guys. So anything I’d say would really be hypothetical, to tell you the truth.
 
“I did look, as the whole defensive staff did, we evaluated last year, what guys did. And he certainly had an impressive year last year. And we think that scheme-wise and technique-wise, what we’re going to do is going to fit him very well.”