Drew Rosenhaus Visited by the Ghost of T.O. Past

Drew Rosenhaus Visited by the Ghost of T.O. Past

DeSean Jackson has already made waves during his short NFL career. He hears adulation for being one of the league's most explosive players, while listening to criticism for being an excessive showboat. And for the better part of two years now, there has been another story lurking beneath the water, just waiting to emerge as a big problem for the Eagles: Jackson's salary.

Jackson's contract has been prevalent in the news since November 2009, when the young wide receiver switched his representation to Drew Rosenhaus. Rosenhaus, as we're sure you recall, is the famous super agent who orchestrated one of the messiest break-ups in Philly sports history between the Birds and Terrell Owens--so when DJac did not receive an extension last year, plenty of observers were expecting the worst.

Thankfully it hasn't come to that yet, but what's different this time around?

Rosenhaus joined PFT Live on Tuesday, and he revealed what many Eagles fans already know about the local football club: they do things on their terms.

“One of the things I realized with the Eagles is that there’s an approach that works with them and an approach that doesn’t work. And the approach that doesn’t work is to try and strongarm them and allow it to become public and take them on.”

Rosenhaus had to find out the hard way Birds' management doesn't cave easily. Through the years, they've lost high profile players such Jeremiah Trotter, Corey Simon, and Brian Dawkins to free agency over contract disputes. They also traded away corners Sheldon Brown and another Rosenhaus client, Lito Sheppard, in consecutive years.

On the flip side, few players who made a stink in the media have been rewarded with new contracts, just arguably the two most important players for the franchise in the last decade, Donovan McNabb and Brian Westbrook.

Jackson, on the other hand, has been remarkably cool throughout the process, this while seemingly every interview last season focused on the money. He's made it perfectly clear he expects to be paid, but has done little to demonstrate his displeasure. He did skip a voluntary camp last off-season, but otherwise there was nothing overt.

The fact is, they will have to do something for their Pro Bowl receiver and returner once the new league year begins, or risk some serious backlash. DJac is in the final year of his contract, the time when an extension would normally be done, and he is scheduled to make just $565,000 in base salary, which is criminal in comparison to his peers. If he's not extended or traded, a holdout seems almost assured.

As always, the Eagles have done an excellent job managing the salary cap, and there is plenty of money lying around to lock up Jackson for a long time if that's what they choose to do. While he will always have his critics as long as he dances in end zones, Jackson will have earned some respect for handling a difficult and unfair contract situation like a professional.

And amazingly, that might have something to do with Rosenhaus.

>> Rosenhaus remembers lessons of T.O. [PFT]

Temple Men’s Basketball adds two players to 2016-17 roster

Temple Men’s Basketball adds two players to 2016-17 roster

Temple men’s basketball coach Fran Dunphy announced that the team has added two players to its 2016-17 roster. 

The Owls will announce the two new transfers, junior’s Isaiah Lewis and Steve Leonard, Thursday night at the Liacouras Center at the team’s Cherry and White Night. 

Lewis comes to Temple after playing for Casper College in Wyoming last season, where he averaged 5.5 points and 2.2 assists per game. Before his stint at Casper College, the 6-4 guard also played at Lee Junior College in Texas, and averaged 10.0 points and 4.7 assists per game.

Leonard, a 6-6 guard from Collegeville, Pa., played two seasons at Ursinus College. He averaged 5.6 points over 43 games during his career at Ursinus. 

Brett Brown: Sixers' Nik Stauskas set for 'breakout year'

Brett Brown: Sixers' Nik Stauskas set for 'breakout year'

CAMDEN, N.J. — The irony of Nik Stauskas’ reputation as a three-point shooter is that he doesn’t view himself that way.

Stauskas was drafted eighth overall by the Kings in 2014 after shooting 44.1 percent from three over two years at Michigan. But that’s not how he envisioned himself being in the pros.

“It’s crazy,” Stauskas said after practice Thursday. “I know I was a great shooter coming out of Michigan, but I don’t consider myself a shooter. I consider myself a gamer. I don’t think I’m an effective NBA player when I just stand and spot up and shoot threes. That’s really not my game.”

Stauskas has struggled to find offensive consistency in the NBA. The third-year two-guard averaged 32.4 percent from long range in his first two seasons. He wasn’t reliable as a knockdown shooter and bounced in and out of the starting lineup last season.

Rather than being a finesse player, Brett Brown encouraged Stauskas to get aggressive. Brown wanted to a see an edge from Stauskas and not hold back at the basket.

Stauskas displayed that side to his game on opening night against the Thunder. In 23 minutes off the bench, he scored 13 points on 5-for-6 shooting. His only miss came on a three-point attempt. His 83.3 shooting percentage was a single-game career high.

“He was cocky,” Brown said. “He was in attack mode. He was not afraid to put it to the floor and get to the rim. I feel like he’s got a real chance to have a breakout year. We need him to have a breakout year.”

The Sixers picked up the options on Stauskas, Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor on Thursday.

“I think the statement the club made on his contract lets him probably have a little bit more comfort on what we think of him,” Brown said. “I was really happy with his swagger last night.”

Stauskas is figuring out his role on the Sixers this season. It is one that can change often given injuries. A key to being successful, whether he is on the perimeter or at the rim, is feeling confident and in a rhythm on the floor.

“I had fun out there,” Stauskas said. “More than anything, I think yesterday was the first time in a while that I’ve really enjoyed myself out there and had a smile on my face.”