Eagles on pace to break NFL’s all-time rushing mark

Eagles on pace to break NFL’s all-time rushing mark

Is LeSean McCoy the best running back in the NFL today?

We actually asked that very question back in 2011, when Shady was en route to a league-high 20 touchdowns and wound up finishing fifth in yards from scrimmage with 1,624 in 15 games. There were backs who wound up with better totals, but for the volume he was getting, one could reasonably make the case he had no peer.

Fast forward back to 2013, and now the numbers back it up as well. Through three games, McCoy is the NFL’s leader in rushing (395) and all-purpose yards (514)—and he’s got about 100 yards on second place. The only back with a better average per carry is Ben Tate, a change-of-pace back for the Texans.

You’ve probably heard this nugget already, but it’s worth repeating: heading into Week 4, LeSean McCoy has more rushing yards by himself than 24 teams.

Statistically speaking, McCoy is clearly the best. The only other player you could probably make an argument for at this moment in time is Adrian Peterson coming off of an MVP season in which the five-time All-Pro ran for 2,000 yards. Okay, he might be the best.

Regardless, as great as Shady has been, what the Eagles are doing on the ground as a team is even more incredible. We mustn’t forget the exploits of one Michael Vick, who has 187 yards of his own, putting the quarterback on the NFL leaderboard at 14th.

All told, Philadelphia’s 209.0 yards per game leads the next-best club by 58.0. Their 6.6 average per carry is a full 1.3 yards ahead of second place.

It’s not even close. The Eagles have been light years better everybody else.

It’s early yet, but at this rate they would have a realistic chance at making history. The Birds are on pace to rack up 3,344 yards on the ground this season. The record for most rushing yards in a single season is currently held by the New England Patriots with 3,165, set way back in 1978.

The Patriots didn’t have a Barry Sanders-esque workhorse—although they did get 539 yards from quarterback Steve Grogan. On top of that contribution, four backs gained at least 391 to help set a mark that’s stood for 35 years. Up to this point, Philly is doing it with two guys.

Just an FYI, New England went 11-5 that season, and was knocked out of the playoffs in the first round.

Whether the Eagles can sustain such a pace over 13 more games is certainly questionable—there certainly won't be much room for error.

They face their toughest test to date this Sunday in the Denver, which touts the NFL’s leading run defense so far. The Broncos are holding opponents to 43.3 yards per game—23.0 fewer than the next-best unit—and it’s not just a matter of high scores forcing teams to throw either. The 2.3 average per attempt is the league’s lowest by half a yard as well.

Of course, the Kansas City Chiefs thought they had a stout run defense too. The Birds ripped them for 260 yards in the loss last week.

I’m not sure there’s any stopping the Eagles from running the football, only containing. Maybe. That is, maybe they can be contained.

They still have a ways to go before their assault on the record books becomes serious, but what they have accomplished on the ground three games into the Chip Kelly era was previously unfathomable. That we’re even discussing a team possibly setting the all-time rushing record during a period when passing records are set every season, if not every week, really says something about this entire offense. It's different to say the least.

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz falls far behind Elliott, Prescott in Rookie of Year odds

Carson Wentz's Rookie of the Year odds took a hit, the Eagles' Super Bowl odds shortened and the Vikings' lengthened after Sunday's 21-10 win.

The Eagles are 33/1 to win it all, a week after being listed by Bovada at 50/1. The Vikings, meanwhile, went from 7/1 to 9/1. They still have the third-shortest Super Bowl odds in the NFL and are two spots ahead of the Cowboys (14/1). 

Wentz, who had his worst statistical game against Minnesota, is now 9/1 to win NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, according to Bovada. Last Wednesday, he was 6/1.

Wentz trails Cowboys studs Ezekiel Elliott (2/5) and Dak Prescott (11/5) on that leaderboard.

As far as this week, Wentz is favored to throw for more yards than Prescott. Wentz is 5/7 to outgain Prescott through the air in Week 8, while Prescott is 1/1 to outgain Wentz.

Elliott's over/under rushing total against the Eagles is 99.5. He's rushed for 130-plus yards in each of his last four games, and the odds are 3/1 that he'll reach that number again this week. 

The Eagles have allowed just one 100-yard rusher this season, Washington's Matt Jones (16 for 135).

Elliott is also now on pace to break Eric Dickerson's rookie rushing record. Dickerson had 1,808 in 1983; Elliott is on pace for 1,875. Will Elliott break that 33-year-old mark? A "yes" bet pays 2/1; a "no" bet pays 1/3.

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Dave Hakstol did Steve Mason a favor by challenging Sabres' 3rd goal

Many, though not all hockey games, have a tipping point or pivotal moment that factors into the outcome.
Sometimes it’s obvious what it was and when the moment occurred. Other times, it’s overshadowed by something else on the ice.
Ask the Flyers which moment would define their come-from-behind 4-3 shootout victory over Buffalo on Tuesday and the response will be virtually unanimous: when Dmitry Kulikov leveled Jakub Voracek with a high hit that made contact to the head in the third period.
Voracek was forced off the ice under the NHL’s concussion protocol.
That hit incensed the Flyers, who went on to score two power-play goals and tie the game, 3-3. The comeback was on.
Yet there was a less obvious but significant point that happened late in the second period, and it concerned goalie Steve Mason.
Matt Moulson had given Buffalo a 3-0 lead on Michal Neuvirth at 15:43, when Flyers coach Dave Hakstol elected to make a goalie switch.
Rather than call a simple timeout to buy Mason some warm-up time and allow his team to collect itself on the bench, Hakstol challenged the goal, claiming “goalie interference.”
Replays won’t show any direct interference on the shot itself. Neuvirth was speared several seconds before the play developed.
Hakstol knew the goal would likely not be overturned, but his strategy was to buy time for Mason and his team. By using a challenge, he knew the review process would take a lot longer than the 60-second timeout.
Either way, he was going to use his only timeout.
“You know what, I think we needed a timeout at that time, anyway,” Hakstol said coyly. “Pretty low probability of it being successful. Everything worked out well in the end.”
Mason appreciated what his coach did, too. Buying extra time for you?
“Yeah, probably,” Mason replied. “Regardless of the situation, you’re sitting on the bench, you know? You’re not really gauged as much as when you’re playing, obviously. So, you just try and ramp things up as quickly as possible.”
Mason had two saves in that shortened period, five in the third period and one in the overtime to register his second victory.
“There’s a never-quit attitude in this room,” he said. “We showed in Chicago — we were just talking about that. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to close that one out.
“But guys have a belief that you get one [moment] and it comes. [Travis Konecny] got us going with his first NHL goal, which is great. The guys really pushed to capitalize on their chances.” ​