End of the Line? Andy Reid Coaches the Eagles in 2012 Finale

End of the Line? Andy Reid Coaches the Eagles in 2012 Finale

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There truly is no other way to dress this game up. Today
probably won’t be memorable, and it certainly isn’t meaningful, but it almost
assuredly will be Andy Reid’s last as head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles.

With a 4-11 record, the Birds have been out of playoff
contention for over a month now. That by itself would be more than enough to
seal Reid’s fate, never mind the utter state of turmoil that surrounded the
team all season long.

Jeffrey Lurie left himself some outs when he delivered what
many perceived to be a public ultimatum to Andy earlier this year, but this
decision boils down to common sense. It’s time.

Unfortunately, the actual contest against the New York
Giants isn’t very intriguing, which often tends to be the case in situations
like these. The G-men still have long odds to reach the tournament, and the
Eagles can eliminate their bitter rivals with a win, so there’s that at least.

However, they’ll be going to battle with Michael Vick under
center, widely believed to be playing his last game for the organization as
well. While likely, that much remains to be seen. Regardless, the progress of
Nick Foles had been one of the only remaining reasons to tune in recently.

Philly is also without defensive tackle Fletcher Cox and
linebacker Mychal Kendricks, making that three of the club’s top four picks
from April’s draft out with injuries. So in terms of evaluating for the future,
how much is there really left to see?

Without advance knowledge about who the next coaching staff
will be comprised of, we’re pretty much past the point of drawing many
conclusions anyhow.

The good news is the holding pattern the Eagles have been
stuck in for the latter half of this season is about to be over. The bad news
is they’ve got to slog through 60 minutes one final time before we actually
come out on the other side of the tunnel. See you there.

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Ben Simmons, Nerlens Noel make up latest frontcourt expirement

Ben Simmons, Nerlens Noel make up latest frontcourt expirement

Galloway, N.J. — The Sixers' abundance of big men lends itself to numerous combinations in the frontcourt.

On Thursday, Nerlens Noel had his first experience playing with Ben Simmons. The center gelled with the rookie forward.

"It's a great duo, I think," Noel said following the morning practice session of training camp at Stockton University.

Noel has been paired with many big men during his career with the Sixers. Most recently he faced the challenge of playing out of position at times with Jahlil Okafor last season. The logjam prompted him to speak out about the current makeup of the roster (see story).

After playing with Simmons, Noel saw how the two can share the court.

"I think we complement each other very well, especially on the defensive end," Noel said. "He's definitely a lockdown type defender that digs in."

Even though Simmons has yet to play an NBA game, Noel already envisions how he can help the Sixers.

"He just plays basketball the right way," Noel said. "When your big man does that, it makes it a lot easier because he is very versatile being a point-forward type. That opens up a lot of things for him to be able to open up for his teammates."

Phillies MVP Jerad Eickhoff proved people wrong, changed expectations

Phillies MVP Jerad Eickhoff proved people wrong, changed expectations

It feels appropriate with the season coming to an end and the recent struggles of the Phillies' entire pitching staff to again point out how consistent Jerad Eickhoff has been in 2016.

Tuesday's rain delay likely cost him a shot at reaching 200 innings — he's sitting on 191⅓ with one start left — but his season has obviously been a success whether or not he reaches that mark. 

Some may argue Odubel Herrera has been the Phillies' MVP this season, but I'd go Eickhoff. Maybe that's just based on the inconsistencies of his rotation mates, but there's real value in a guy who gives you six quality innings each time out. Eickhoff this season was basically John Lackey — a reliable mid-rotation workhorse with solid but unspectacular numbers.

ESPN's longtime prospect analyst Keith Law mentioned Eickhoff this week in an Insider post looking at players he judged incorrectly. Eickhoff and Cubs Cy Young candidate Kyle Hendricks were the first two pitchers mentioned.

In his assessment of what went wrong with his initial evaluation of Eickhoff, Law wrote:

"I hadn't seen Eickhoff in the minors and, based on what I'd heard about him, had him as a back-end starter, saying he had the repertoire to start but giving him a limited, back-end ceiling. Eickhoff had a good curveball with Texas. But the Phillies' staff has encouraged him to throw it more often, and it's been a difference-making pitch for him. His curve accounted for 40 percent of his swings and misses in 2016, and it's one of the most effective curveballs in MLB right now; that pitch alone has made him more than just a back-end starter, and he has been the Phillies' most valuable starter this year. He is probably a league-average, No. 3 starter going forward with the arsenal he has — average fastball, plus curveball, inconsistent slider that flashes plus but on which he makes too many mistakes — and with 4-WAR potential, given his durability."

Eickhoff's curveball was what made a lot of us take notice late last season. He used it to shut down some good lineups in September, and he finished 2015 with back-to-back seven-inning, 10-strikeout games against the Nationals and Mets.

This season, he grew up. He incorporated the slider more and that led him out of an early-season funk. Early in the year, hitters were laying off his curveball and swinging at any fastball near the zone because it's a hittable pitch. Once he started showing another breaking ball, the game plan for the opposition became more complicated.

There was nothing fluky about Eickhoff's 2016 season. He'll enter the final day of the season 11-14 with a 3.72 ERA and 1.17 WHIP. 

It's pretty startling to compare Eickhoff's numbers since joining the Phillies to Cole Hamels' with the Rangers. Have a look.

• Hamels with the Rangers (44 starts): 3.42 ERA, 1.27 WHIP, 2.8 K/BB ratio, .244 opponents' batting average

• Eickhoff with the Phillies (40 starts): 3.49 ERA, 1.14 WHIP, 3.9 K/BB ratio, .244 opponents' batting average

It's not an apples to apples comparison because Hamels has pitched about 40 more innings than Eickhoff in a tougher league and in a tougher ballpark. It doesn't mean that going forward they will be equals. It just means that over the last season and a half, their production has been close to equal.

Nobody would have expected a year ago that Eickhoff would be the best piece in that trade. But until Jorge Alfaro and Nick Williams graduate to the majors in full-time roles and produce, Eickhoff will be the unexpected centerpiece of that blockbuster deal with the Rangers.

He's a walking example of solid scouting and even better player development by the Phillies.