Football Analogies Break Out to Describe Lockout Status

Football Analogies Break Out to Describe Lockout Status

As the NFL lockout creeps toward the point of no return, signs of progress between players and owners are picking up. Just read the quotes from league sources in Don Banks' latest Inside the NFL column on the labor situation. The tone has changed. They're not talking about the difference in total revenue or the dates of upcoming legal proceedings.

They're talking about punching it into the end zone.

"I'd say that back in March, we weren't in the same stadium," said one league source of the players and owners. "But if you think of both sides as a team, now we're in the red zone, we're driving, we can see the goal line and we have momentum. But can we still screw it up? Absolutely. That's why [Thursday] and Friday are big days, because it's back to the (negotiating) formula that's been most successful."

"It does feel like we're at the 5-yard line, and we're right there," one NFL general manager said Wednesday. "But it's like Jerome Bettis has the ball, and I've seen him fumble on the 1-yard line before. If there's a fumble now, hopefully either Goodell or Smith plays Ben Roethlisberger and stops the whole thing from falling apart."

Okay, so nobody is willing to go out on a limb and say a new collective bargaining agreement is essentially a done deal, but a sure sign everybody is getting pretty excited is when the financial and legal jargon is replaced by football lingo. If you've been following this crisis from day one, you may know better than to get your hopes up by now, but take a look at the list of game changing plays that have gone down over the last week or so (courtesy of PFT):

  • - The Pro Football Hall of Fame is still planning to hold the preseason opener on August 7, adding both the players and owners want to play the game. Not having the nationally televised game would result in the first major loss of revenue since the lockout began.
  • - The players' lawyers in the Tom Brady antitrust case renegotiated their contracts, and it's believed they will now be paid a flat fee regardless of outcome. This suggests the players will not go through with the suit, as the lawyers basically would be surrendering money over an extended period of time.
  • - The owners are currently scheduled to meet on July 21, but a source informed PFT they would convene sooner if a deal were ready. 24 of the 32 owners must vote to ratify a new collective bargaining agreement.
  • - The lawyers for both sides have been meeting throughout this week, even working overtime yesterday, as they apparently have begun preparing the actual paperwork that will eventually become the CBA.

Another great sign is the Eagles' unofficial mid-June deadline to decide whether they would hold training camp at Lehigh came and went without so much of a peep from either the team or the University. It was reported they would like to reach a decision one way or the other before now, but much has happened since then, with negotiations finally taking place in earnest over the past month to month-and-a-half.

Les Bowen interviewed Eagles COO Don Smolenski, who is responsible for organizing the annual retreat to Bethlehem, and he sounded very much like a man who will be--and perhaps already is--busy with preparations.

"So far, the dialogue has been, 'We're going to go with it, we're going to do the best we can with whatever date comes,' " he said.

When it comes down to it, camp is probably going to be held at Lehigh as planned, as will the 2011 NFL season. There is simply too much money involved for either side to walk away from, and after all, that's what this whole thing is about. Could negotiations still break down faster than Dimitri Patterson in coverage? Nobody has been willing to take a leap of faith on the record whether those fears have merit or not.

But they want you to know it's not a Hail Mary pass or 60-yard field goal into the wind. I think everybody secretly would like to bet on professional football completing the fourth quarter comeback.

>> NFL labor negotiations 'at the 5-yard line' [SI.com]
>> His job is to keep Linc jumpin' and Eagles ready to spring to action [Philly.com]

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Has The Process come full circle?

The Sixers "will take a hard look" at point guard Jrue Holiday in free agency, according to ESPN's Zach Lowe

Holiday, of course, was the Sixers' starting PG from 2009-13, before he was traded on draft night by then-GM Sam Hinkie for Nerlens Noel and a future first-round pick (which became Elfrid Payton, who was traded for Dario Saric).

In four seasons since, Holiday has averaged 15.3 points, 3.4 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 1.4 steals for the Pelicans. He's fought injury and missed 122 games since joining New Orleans.

The Pelicans have Anthony Davis but little else. They're going to need to make some tough decisions moving forward and one will be with Holiday.

As Lowe points out, there aren't many teams in need of a point guard — he lists the Sixers, Kings, Knicks and maybe the Magic as players for a PG in free agency.

"[Holiday] fits what [the Sixers] need around Ben Simmons, and the hilariousness of Philly bringing Holiday back after flipping him to start The Process is irresistible," Lowe writes.

Holiday has never been a great three-point shooter but he's been decent from long-range his entire career, topping out at 39 percent and sitting at 36.8 percent over eight NBA seasons.

He's coming off a four-year, $41 million contract, and although he has a lengthy injury history, he'll still command a nice-sized contract in free agency, especially with the cap expected to increase again.