It's Time to Forgive and Forget the NFL Lockout

It's Time to Forgive and Forget the NFL Lockout

All that matters is they got it done.

Forget the speech from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell where he talked about winning back the fans. Ignore all the tough rhetoric from fans who threatened various boycotts and demonstrations. By getting a deal done, and in time that a season was not missed, even shortened or delayed for that matter, the owners and players did the only thing that truly counted.

They gave football back to the people.

There are plenty of folks who understandably will still be peeved about the process. For over four months—and really, much longer than that—a battle often labeled as "Millionaires vs. Billionaires" was waged chiefly through carefully crafted public relations messages rather than at the bargaining table. The cherry on top, a $10 billion dollar prize, every penny of which either directly or indirectly comes from average people like you and me.

Even to a less cynical person, it all came off as greedy, and selfish, and... well that's because it was, actually. As much as we may hate to admit it, professional football isn't merely a game that grown men get paid to play. It's a business, and is subject to disagreements over how the money gets shared from time to time.

So with all that finally over and done with, and apparently for the next decade at that, I say, "No harm, no foul."
 
Let's try to keep things in perspective. The NFL hasn't missed games or played a shortened season as a result of labor issues since 1987. In that timeframe, Major League Baseball lost a World Series, the NHL lost an entire season, and the NBA is currently embroiled in its own lockout limbo that will almost certainly leave arenas dark into 2012.

Again, the NFL didn't miss anything. The off-season was funky, and a nationally televised scrimmage preseason game was the lone scheduling casualty. Other than that, the lockout has left no measurable impact on the fans from a pure numbers standpoint.

It remains to be seen whether September will feature sloppy football and an increase in injuries, as some observers suggest might be the result of a long summer off. Those things are certainly possible. Players will be out of shape, and free agents will join their new clubs in camp later.

But I'll take sloppy football over no football though, even over delayed football, or less football. Once Labor Day has come and gone, it will be pigskin season again. For the fans, that ought to be enough.

Check out the new 50th anniversary Flyers jerseys with gold numbers

flyers-50th-jerseys.jpg

Check out the new 50th anniversary Flyers jerseys with gold numbers

If you fancy yourself a traditionalist, these new Flyers jerseys probably aren't going to be for you. That's because these sweaters aren't orange and black. They're orange and... gold?

True, the franchise is celebrating 50 years of its existence this upcoming season, or the golden anniversary as its often known. At the same time, the use of that color on a uniform that, despite undergoing many changes through the years, has always stuck with the tried and true orange and black.

But hey, don't knock them until you've see them. Here's Flyers captain Claude Giroux modeling the new duds at the big unveiling on Wednesday.

The Flyers will wear the jerseys 12 times during the 2016-17 campaign, and it's said late team owner Ed Snider was involved in their design.

Beau Allen, Taylor Hart prove they’re scheme fits, outlast competition

Beau Allen, Taylor Hart prove they’re scheme fits, outlast competition

Plenty of people outside the Eagles’ organization — and probably a few inside — doubted that Beau Allen and Taylor Hart would be able to play in Jim Schwartz’s aggressive 4-3 defense. 

But Allen and Hart never doubted themselves. 

“I think for whatever reason, we got brought in to two-gap and I think we got labeled as two-gappers, and for whatever reason, that kind of stuck,” Allen said. “And when people think of two-gappers, they think, ‘This guy will stay on blocks and aren’t as athletic.’ I guess what I’m trying to say I think there’s a different perception between guys that two-gap and guys that play in the defense we play. 

“We’ve known all along that we can do this. And I think all the guys in the locker room have known that. It’s just kind of flipping that switch in your brain and getting used to a new mentality and scheme and being comfortable in it.”

Over the past month, they’ve shown they can indeed fit in Schwartz’s defense. 

Allen and Hart were drafted in the seventh and fifth rounds, respectively, in the 2014 draft. Allen was seen as a prototypical nose tackle and Hart a 3-4 end. While Allen played in an attacking defense in college, Hart had never played a 4-3 tackle in college or the pros. 

Still, they have both seemingly earned spots on the Eagles’ 53-man roster. 

“I hope that the play I’ve done out here in these three preseason games has shown that I’m not just a 3-4 guy,” Hart said. “I can play both schemes.”

For a long time, veteran free agent pickup Mike Martin was considered not just a roster lock, but also a rotation player on the defensive line. He worked as the third tackle for a lot of the offseason before hurting his knee. He missed a couple weeks and was recently cut. 

So how did Martin go from being a contributor to off the team?  

“The knee just never came back,” head coach Doug Pederson said. “It just never bounced back, and it is hard. It's tough for players and veteran players like that. You're making decisions that are kind of out of his control.”

With Martin gone, the top two backup tackles appear to be Allen and Hart, while undrafted rookies Destiney Vaeao and Aziz Shittu appear to be on the outside looking in.

With a roster spot already likely locked in, Allen will play in the preseason finale against the Jets, where he joked he hopes to pad his stats. Hart’s preseason is already over. He has knee and ankle injuries that will keep him out for the Jets' game, but Pederson said Hart will be ready for the opener. 

Ready for the opener? That sounds like Hart has already won a job. 

“I didn’t hear that,” Hart said. “Well, we’ll see what happens.”

Allen and Hart roomed together during their rookie seasons and remain close friends. They also worked incredibly hard this offseason to pickup a new defense and shed that “two-gapper” label. 

One guy who might not be as surprised about Allen and Hart’s success in the defense is the guy in charge of it. Back in early August, before the pair showed what they could do in a game, Schwartz was asked about them and said, “Don’t sell those guys short. Just because that's what they were asked to do doesn't mean [that’s] the only thing [they’re capable of doing].

Turns out he was right. 

Was there ever really that preconceived notion that they couldn’t play in this defense? 

“Maybe from you guys (media),” Hart said with a smile. “I believed in myself.”

It looks like that belief is paying off. 

Josh Huff has been talking to a sports psychologist

ap-josh-huff.jpg
AP

Josh Huff has been talking to a sports psychologist

One of the most frustrating Eagles in recent memory, talent has never been the issue for Josh Huff. The third-year wide receiver can create separation and runs well with the ball in his hands. He's a plus blocker, contributes on special teams and gives constant effort.

Huff makes big plays from time to time, but what really stands are the miscues. The dropped passes. The fumbles. The missed assignments. The only think that's been keeping the 24-year-old from carving out a bigger role in the offense making an impact is himself.

Apparently Huff realizes that too, because as he revealed to Turron Davenport for USA Today, the 2014 third-round draft pick has been seeing a sports psychologist. In fact, apparently he's been reaching out for a little help since last year.

“I have been talking to a psychologist about football,” Huff said. “I have been too hard on myself when dropping balls. I also know that it will happen in this league. It’s a long season; you’re not going to catch every pass. That’s what I had to realize.

“I did it some last year (sports psychologist), and it didn’t help me too much. The one that I have now, he’s amazing. He is helping me elevate my game. I had a pregame routine that I got away from but after talking to him, I started doing it again.”

Huff certainly seems to believe it's helping, but whether it will equate to results on the field remains to be seen. He had a big game against the Colts on Saturday, catching two passes for 60 yards and carrying twice for 10 and a touchdown. Of course, Huff dropped a ball against the Steelers one week earlier, and fumbled another against the Bucs in the opener.

If Huff can keep his head in the game, this Eagles coaching staff appears poised to find ways to get him the rock. They've been designing all sorts of screens and quick passes to make more use of what is arguably his best skill, running after the catch.

Of course, the first part of running after the catch is catching the football, and the second part is not fumbling afterward. You have the appreciate Huff's dedication to his craft that when he admits speaking to a sports psychologist, but it's only him out there on the field on Sundays.