Latest Updates on Eagles-Browns: DeMeco Ryans, Bryce Brown, Trent Richardson, & More

Latest Updates on Eagles-Browns: DeMeco Ryans, Bryce Brown, Trent Richardson, & More

We mentioned DeMeco Ryans had been replaced by Jamar Chaney in the defense's nickel package at practice on Thursday. Following up on those reports, when practice resumed the following afternoon, Ryans was back to work in the nickel, suggesting the experiment as a three-down linebacker is not dead yet.

In an attempt to clarify just what the heck is going on at the heart of the Eagles' defense, Andy Reid only made the picture more convoluted, admitting all six of the team's linebackers will play on Sunday. So along with Ryans, Mychal Kendricks, and Akeem Jordan, apparently we'll see plenty of Chaney, Casey Matthews, and Brian Rolle as well.

“We had success with it towards the end of last year,” Reid said. “Guys know their roles. They can focus in on it. They’re all interchangeable, which is a good thing. They all know each other’s positions and have gotten reps at all positions, which works out well.”

While Geoff Mosher categorizes this as a carousel, I'll save the skepticism until we see exactly how much the subs are utilized and in what roles. I can see a scenario where Ryans gives way to the speedier Chaney in third-and-long situations, but where Matthews or Rolle fit into the equation, I'm not really sure.

>> Bowen: Eagles think they are ready to do linebacker shuffle [DN]

Dion Lewis is listed as questionable with a hamstring injury, which means Bryce Brown could be the guy who carries the load behind Shady on Sunday. At this point, the only knock on Brown is his pass protection, which is a huge part of the running back's job in Reid's offense, and may convince the coaches to lean heavily on McCoy.

As a pure rusher though, the seventh-round rookie has been ultra impressive. With is fluid running style, burst, and power -- not to mention ability to catch the ball out of the backfield -- Brown looks like he may be a superior talent to Lewis. Brown carried 22 times for 122 yards (4.4 avg) and a score in the preseason, along with seven receptions for 62 ticks.

>> Bryce Brown on fast track to meaningful role [CSN]

Browns linebacker Scott Fujita got a reprieve from the suspension handed down for his involvement in the Saints bounty scandal -- for now. Word is the suspensions will be reinstated eventually, but Fujita is available to play on Sunday after an arbitrator's ruling came down late Friday afternoon.

Fujita could shore up a shaky situation at outside linebacker, where the Browns were thin in the wake of the suspension and Chris Gocong's injury. However, Fujita is banged up himself, and the word is he likely won't take the field on Sunday. Minor break for the Birds, though Fujita is no game changer either.

>> Health, not suspension, could keep Scott Fujita off the field [PFT]

On the other hand, expectations for Cleveland's Trent Richardson are on the rise for this Sunday. At one point, whether or not the third overall pick would even play so soon after having a procedure on his knee was not a sure thing, and many believed if he did, the Browns would ease the back into the offense.

Estimates have changed quite a bit, and despite his questionable status, Richardson could have a full load on his plate against the Eagles. Browns GM Tom Hecker told a Canton newspaper "if he's ready to go, he's ready to go." If the Browns intend to stay in the game, they may feel the need to keep handing the ball to Richardson, partly to take pressure off of their rookie QB, partly to eat some clock, but also just because he's already got to be their biggest playmaker. Brandon Jackson will surely see some snaps as well though.

>> Interview: Browns' Heckert happy old boss sees improving team []

WR Riley Cooper and S Colt Anderson are out. Both normally contribute on special teams. Their absences could be felt if dangerous return man Josh Cribbs has a big day.

The Eagles need a big-time wide receiver


The Eagles need a big-time wide receiver

I’ve been saying it since early 2000s: The Eagles will never, ever win a Super Bowl again until they go out and get a big-time wide receiver. 

The one year they had one -- 2004, with Terrell Owens -- they got to the Super Bowl. But they never got there earlier, with the likes of Na Brown, Todd Pinkston and James Thrash; nor later, when they blew it with T.O. and failed to land Big-Time Receivers like Roy Williams, Erik Moulds, Javon Walker, or Peerless Price. 

We face a similar situation today.  The Eagles are 4-2 and just beat the Vikings, the league’s last undefeated team. But the team’s lackluster receiving corps threatens to derail the season, and with it the crucial first year of Carson Wentz’s career. Missing out on the playoffs in their rookie year because of receivers who can’t catch the ball is the sort of thing that ruins young quarterbacks for life. 

Don’t make the same mistake again, Howie Roseman. Go out and get Alshon Jeffrey. Or Torrey Smith. Or better yet, Alshon Jeffrey AND Torrey Smith. I don’t care what it takes- and it’s not like the Eagles are ever having draft picks again anyway. 

Of course, none of this would be a problem if we’d traded for Anquan Boldin. I’ve wanted the Eagles to get Anquan Boldin for 10 years, and they never have- not even this year, when he was a free agent, and he went and signed with the Lions and helped beat us two weeks ago.  

So in conclusion: Do whatever it takes, Howie. Start a bidding war. Just keep offering #1 picks until the Bears or Niners say yes. 


In an event I’d have considered considerably less likely than either the prospect of a Cubs world championship or the election of a woman as president of the United States, Joel Embiid on Wednesday night played in a regular season game for the Philadelphia 76ers. It took almost three years, but Embiid finally passed Andrew Bynum on the Sixers’ All-Time Games Played List. 

But Embiid was not the MVP for the Sixers’ opener. That title goes to the older gentleman who charged at Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook with two raised middle fingers, as he screamed an f-bomb at him. 

Yes, he was thrown out of the arena, though had it been up to me I’d have given the guy a ticket upgrade, and possibly a job with the team. The greater point is, how many times did you see fans in courtside seats flipping the bird at opposing superstars, in the three years Sam Hinkie was in charge? Exactly. The passion for the Sixers is back. 

My ideal scenario: The Sixers trade for Russell Westbrook, and the cover of next year’s team yearbook is Westbrook and that fan, side by side, flipping the bird together. 


Other Philly sports takes: 

- It’s so, so pathetic that Pittsburgh keeps changing the name of its hockey arena. 

- I heard they were doing E-A-G-L-E-S chants at the Sixers home opener. Awful- they should keep that stuff where it belongs, at Phillies games. 

- I can't figure out how to pronounce Big V's full name so for now I'll just call him "Winston Justice.”

- My thoughts on the WIP lineup changes? It’s about to time they gave a shot to an ex-Eagle in the mid-day, and an overweight out-of-towner in the afternoon. 

Follow @FakeWIPCaller on Twitter. 

Mike McQueary's defamation suit against Penn State headed to jury

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Mike McQueary's defamation suit against Penn State headed to jury

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — Lawyers for a former Penn State assistant football coach urged a judge and jurors Thursday to find the university liable for how it treated him after it became public that his testimony helped prosecutors charge Jerry Sandusky with child molestation.

McQueary is seeking more than $4 million in lost wages and other damages, saying he was defamed by a statement the school president released the day Sandusky was charged, retaliated against for helping with the Sandusky investigation and misled by school administrators.

Sandusky, a former defensive coach at Penn State, was convicted in 2012 of sexual abuse of 10 boys and is serving a 30- to 60-year prison sentence. He maintains his innocence.

In closing arguments Thursday, Penn State attorney Nancy Conrad emphasized that McQueary had said he was damaged by public criticism that he did not to go to police or child-welfare authorities when he saw Sandusky sexually abusing a boy in a team shower in 2001. Instead he reported it the next day to then-head coach Joe Paterno.

"Mr. McQueary was not damaged by any action of the university," Conrad argued. "Mr. McQueary, as he testified and as he recognized, if he was harmed, was harmed by national media and public opinion."

McQueary testified he has not been able to find work, either in coaching or elsewhere, but Conrad blamed that on an inadequate network of contacts and the lack of a national reputation.

Judge Thomas Gavin will decide the whistleblower count, a claim that McQueary was treated unfairly as the school suspended him from coaching duties, placed him on paid administrative leave, barred him from team facilities and then did not renew his contract shortly after he testified at Sandusky's 2012 trial.

McQueary was not allowed to coach in the school's first game after Paterno was fired, a home loss to Nebraska.

"That sends a very clear signal to those in your network that the university doesn't want you to be supported," Strokoff said. "`Stay away, you're a nonperson.'"

Penn State has argued it put McQueary on leave out of safety concerns, as threats were fielded by the university.

Strokoff said there was no evidence of multiple death threats against his client, and called McQueary's treatment outrageous.

"He should not have been the scapegoat," Strokoff said.

Jurors will decide the defamation claim and a misrepresentation allegation that two administrators lied to him when they said they took his report of Sandusky seriously and would respond appropriately.

Conrad insisted they did take steps to inform McQueary about the actions they were taking, which included meeting with Sandusky and an official from the children's welfare charity he founded, and telling Sandusky to stop bringing children into team facilities.

"No one told Mr. McQueary, `You cannot go to the police,'" Conrad said.

The defamation claim involves a statement issued by Penn State then-president Graham Spanier expressing support for the two administrators, then-athletic director Tim Curley and then-vice president Gary Schultz, when they were charged with perjury in November 2011 for allegedly lying about what McQueary told them in the weeks after the 2001 incident.

The perjury charges against them were dismissed earlier this year by a state appeals court, but Curley, Schultz and Spanier still await trial in Harrisburg on charges of failure to properly report suspected child abuse and endangering the welfare of children.

McQueary lawyer Elliot Strokoff said Spanier's statement could have led people to conclude McQueary was a liar.

"If the charges are groundless, then the grad assistant lied," Strokoff said. "And that's defamation."

Conrad said Spanier's statement indicated the charges against his two top lieutenants would be proven groundless.