Michael Vicks 2010 Season Not as Good as Advertised

Michael Vicks 2010 Season Not as Good as Advertised

Vick
will turn the ball over more in 2011. Whether you consider his past, the Eagles
offense’s past, or the past of players around the league as a whole, his 1.6
percent interception rate just isn’t sustainable. For reference, consider that
Peyton Manning’s never had an interception rate that low. Vick isn’t suddenly
going to throw 25 interceptions, but it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Vick’s
interceptions to double over the course of a full season next year. He was also
able to recover seven of his ten fumbles.

-         
Football Outsiders Almanac 2011

Every once in awhile sports will prove you wrong – some of
us more than others of course (looking at you, Chronic Opinion). But make
enough proclamations about this team, or that athlete, and eventually you will
eat your words.

This is not one of those stories.

This is the first post in a two-part series, because I
discovered that I could not easily convince anybody that Michael Vick is and always has been a below average NFL quarterback without first dispelling the notion that he had
a great 2010. I mean the man was voted Comeback Player of the Year, and was
practically the runner-up for league MVP even though the voting swung
unanimously for Tom Brady. You would have to be a crazy person to suggest Vick
was anything less than tremendous! What about the Redskins game?

Let me backtrack for a moment. Vick did deserve Comeback
Player of the Year, and he did improve exponentially over the player he had
become in Atlanta – after two full years out of football at that. I’m not going
to sit here and tell you that he’s not a more refined passer than he was in
2006, or a better human being for that matter. He absolutely is both of those
things.

Neither of which makes him an effective quarterback, even though
he managed to look the part for one season – or half of one at least, if we’re
being generous. Where to begin? Perhaps in Washington, at the undisputed high
point of Vick’s tenure with the Eagles.

The Rise

Michael
Vick, who was given no chance to come back to the game by so many, now runs the
most dangerous offense in the game. The sheer improbability of this comeback
marks it as among the greatest in sports history, whether you like Michael Vick
or not.

-         
Doug Farrar of Shutdown Corner after the Eagles
defeat Washington 59-28 on MNF

In a 59-28 romp over the NFC East-rival Redskins, Vick completed
20-of-28 passes for 333 yards and four touchdowns, while also carrying the ball
eight times for 80 yards and two more scores. He looked simply unstoppable. Why
choose this, the game of a lifetime, you might ask?

Because it’s the great lie. We all fell for that performance
on some level. How could you not?

In a word, it was incredible – quite literally.

That was the game responsible for pushing positive Vick
sentiment over the top, with Steve Young and Trent Dilfer fawning all over him
on ESPN immediately after and the next day, describing the outing as “transformational”
and “the full fruition of the position.”

Prior to it, Vick had wins over a pair of sorry franchises
in Detroit and Jacksonville, which were bookended by his starting the season
number two on the depth chart and a rib injury that knocked him out of action
for a month. The only victory of any magnitude he had entering Washington came
one week earlier, a 26-24 clinger over the Manning-led Indianapolis Colts – a
quality win to be sure, but also one where the QB relied on his legs more than
you would have liked against the league’s worst pass defense.

The Skins were no exceptional foe either for that matter,
but after that it was too late to put the brakes on the hype train. Vick had
yet to commit a turnover at this point in the year, even though he hadn’t even
played in several contests, and New York Giants head coach Tom Coughlin pointed
out he had ample opportunity to do so. “There have been a lot of times when the
ball has been in [an opponent’s] hands. They haven't caught the ball.”

In other words, Vick had been extremely fortunate up to that
point, and had anybody been willing to open their eyes, it wouldn’t have been
up for very much debate. Loser opponents, lousy pass defenses, recovered
fumbles, dropped interceptions… that kind of luck was never going to hold up.

The Fall

Vick … will always be Vick. That's never
been good enough before, and there's no reason to believe it suddenly is now.

-         
Andrew
Kulp on The700Level.com, September 16, 2010

Sure enough, it didn’t. Vick lost his first fumble of the
season the following week while posting his lowest passer rating (83.0) and
yards per carry (3.1) of the season thus far as the Giants blitzed the hell out
of him – yet since the Birds were ahead when the final gun sounded, those minor
details got buried. Next it was the Chicago Bears that smothered him, forcing
four fumbles, not one of which went to the other team somehow, but also a crucial
first pick of the season in helping Philly to a loss.

Vick would tread water against 6-10 opponents for two more
weeks until the most fraudulent moment of all occurred: the Miracle at the New
Meadowlands. For 52 minutes, this was the exact opposite of Washington. Vick looked
sloppy, out of sync, and barely able to complete so much as a pass. He was a
big part of the reason, if not the biggest, why the Eagles were trailing by 21
points in the fourth quarter to begin with.

Had the game ended in such abysmal fashion, the headlines
the next day would have read: Is the
Michael Vick experiment over? How many stories had to be scrapped or
rewritten on the count of that improbable comeback, the Eagles winning 38-31 on
a DeSean Jackson punt return as the final seconds ticked off the clock?

As it turned out, those eight minutes actually served as one
final showcase of Vick’s elite talent. Oh, we always knew he could run like the
wind, we know he can throw a pretty pass, and in the rare moments where he puts
it all together, he can have paralyzingly dominant nights like he did in
Washington, or eight-minute stretches of pure brilliance such as that comeback
against the Giants.

The problem has always been sustaining that level of play,
which he has never really been able to ever in his career, but especially not
since those supposed defining moments.

The End

Those eight minutes weren’t a sign of things to come, the
first 52 were. With a postseason bye essentially on the line one week later, a
lowly Minnesota Vikings team blitzed Vick into submission on a Tuesday night.
He turned the ball over three times in the embarrassing 24-14 loss, his worst
game in an Eagles uniform up to that point. The next time he stepped on the
field, the Eagles fell in the first-round of the playoffs to the eventual world
champion Green Bay Packers 21-16. Vick would throw the decisive interception in
the fourth quarter.

Now tell me again, how sensational was Michael Vick in 2010?
He was a better quarterback than he was at any point during his time in Atlanta,
that’s for sure. He was good enough to supplant Kevin Kolb. He was good enough
to beat inferior opponents. And he was good enough to produce two of the most
memorable moments in Eagles history. He was the Comeback Player of the Year.

In this case though, legend is not reality. The flaws Vick
exhibited in 2011 and ‘12 were showing from the very beginning. He was always
holding on to the ball too long, not reading the blitz, taking too many sacks.
The turnovers and injuries were always going to catch up to him. They were
already there. It was inevitable.

Why is 2010 – 10-6 with a first-round playoff exit – still celebrated as some extraordinary season?
Because of two-and-a-half games, and the name on the back of the jersey. If any
other quarterback had the year Vick had, signing him to a long-term contract
rather than searching for a quarterback of the future would have come under far
more scrutiny. Because it was Michael Vick, a former first-overall pick who was
at one time the most dynamic athlete to ever play the position, because he is occasionally capable of doing special
things on a football field, it was mostly received as the right thing to do.

It was all an illusion. An extra INT here, one spoiled comeback there, and it would've been just another 8-8 season from the Birds featuring middling quarterback play. It never should have come as a surprise when Michael Vick fell back to earth.

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Chad Ford: 'High likelihood' Sixers trade Jahlil Okafor or Nerlens Noel

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Chad Ford: 'High likelihood' Sixers trade Jahlil Okafor or Nerlens Noel

Technically, the Sixers don't have to trade any of their myriad of big men just yet. Nerlens Noel, Jahlil Okafor and Joel Embiid are all under contract. The organization can take its time evaluating which pieces should lay the foundation for the post-process era.

That being said, we already know Noel and Okafor don't work well together at all, at least they did not complement one another their first year together. And with Embiid perhaps finally ready to hit the floor in 2016, the Sixers are about to have an even bigger cluster on their hands in trying to rotate three centers.

With that in mind, NBA insider Chad Ford doesn't think the Sixers will wait. In fact, in an interview for 97.3 ESPN, the veteran reporter went on to describe the possibility of either Okafor or Noel being traded before the 2016-17 season as likely.

I think that there's a very high likelihood, that whether it's to move up in the draft or use them to grab a free agent in a sign and trade or just to a trade, that you will not see the Nerlens Noel-Jahlil Okafor pairing at the start of next season. I think that they'll gauge the interest of both players. I think that there might be a slight preference for Noel, to keep him around with the Sixers, and I think you might be right, there might be a slight, better value for Okafor out on the market, but I think everyone agrees that that combination of those two players doesn't necessarily work.

The Sixers needs to pick up assets, especially if they're gonna go ahead and do a Ben Simmons or Brandon Ingram with the first pick in the draft. Then they're gonna need those assets to start to fill out their backcourt, because the 24th pick and [the 26th pick], you're not finding starters. I'm not even sure that you're necessarily finding rotation players at that back end of the draft that are gonna make big impact, so they're gonna have to do that via free agency or via trade, and I think either Okafor or Noel — I don't think they'll trade both — but one of those two is probably their best trade chip.

The idea the Sixers would make a move to break up Okafor and Noel isn't exactly fresh. There was doubt they could coexist from the beginning, and already by the trade deadline, rumors the club was at least fielding calls.

What might be a little surprising, however, is Ford's sense the Sixers might prefer Noel of the two. We can come up with a whole host of reasons why that could be — in fact, we did, from Okafor's attitude and off-court behavior, to his skill set being too similar to that of Joel Embiid, to name a few. But at the end of the day, most feel Okafor has the much higher upside.

As for whether Ford would do the deal for the Boston Celtics' third-overall pick in this year's draft, as has been hinted at by numerous reporters, he says, "Absolutely."

If I was Philadelphia, it would be done tomorrow. I don't know if Boston would do it, but for Philadelphia, 100 percent. That would allow them to actually I think bring in another guard, an elite guard, whether that's Kris Dunn or Jamal Murray, and suddenly now you've got a very, very bright future. I think that's an easy call for the Sixers if Boston would do it.

But the biggest takeaway here is Ford anticipates one or the other is gone this offseason. Again, he's far from alone in thinking that, but it's one thing to suggest a trade makes sense, and quite another to say there's "a very high likelihood" it goes down.

Ford also takes on a number of other topics in the interview, from his preference for Simmons over Ingram to the Sixers' plans for this offseason and beyond.

Future Phillies Report: Power from Alfaro, Cozens; Crawford settles in at AAA

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Tug Haines, Don Holohan/Reading Fightin Phils

Future Phillies Report: Power from Alfaro, Cozens; Crawford settles in at AAA

J.P. Crawford is settling in at Triple A, Jorge Alfaro and Dylan Cozens continue to show power, and Zach Eflin threw seven more shutout innings for the IronPigs.

All of that and more in this week's Future Phillies Report:

C Jorge Alfaro (AA)
The home run Alfaro hit Monday in Reading was such a no-doubter that Erie centerfielder JaCoby Jones didn't even turn around. Alfaro's blast landed on the top of the hill in center at FirstEnergy Stadium, his third of the season.

The hard-hitting catcher continues to impress at Double A. He's gone 11 for 29 (.379) with a homer and five RBIs since our last check-up, posting four multi-hit games in his last seven. Alfaro is up to .353 on the season with an .897 OPS that would be higher if he had walked more than twice on the year. 

Alfaro has never been the most patient hitter. He has one goal at the plate and that's to do damage, and so far this season he's been Reading's top run producer. Alfaro has 11 extra-base hits and 21 RBIs in 24 games.

He also continues to stand out behind the plate. Alfaro has thrown out three more base-stealers over the last week to make him 8 for 18 on the season.

Alfaro finds himself in a tricky situation. He's hitting enough to warrant a call-up to Triple A, but the Phillies aren't going to promote him and create a logjam behind the plate at Lehigh Valley with Andrew Knapp. And even if Knapp may eventually have to switch positions, it's in the Phils' best interest to keep developing both players as catchers in the meantime.

Instead, look for Alfaro to stay at Double A, where the Phillies will hope he can stay healthy and build confidence by continuing to torch Eastern League pitching.

SS J.P. Crawford (AAA)
Five games into his Triple A career, the Phillies' top prospect is 3 for 15 (.200) but has walked four times. Of course he has. Crawford's walked nearly once a game this season, with 34 in 41 games, one every 5.4 plate appearances.

He's converted all 16 defensive chances in his first week with the IronPigs.

Crawford earned the promotion last Friday after hitting .265 with a .398 on-base percentage four Double A Reading. This is his last stop before the majors, which Crawford figures to get a taste of this September. From there, you could see him battle for the Phillies' opening day shortstop job next spring.

Crawford has been batting second for the IronPigs, a lineup spot he figures to occupy once he sticks in the majors. Crawford doesn't have a ton of speed, but his ability to work counts, make contact and reach base at a high clip make him a prototypical No. 2 hitter.

His best game at Triple A so far was last Sunday, when he went 1 for 2 with two walks against Toledo. The single and both walks came against Tigers top pitching prospect Daniel Norris. 

Crawford is seeing better pitchers at Triple A and how he holds up bears watching. On Tuesday, he went 0 for 3 against Red Sox left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez, who was successful last season in the majors. On Wednesday, Crawford hit an opposite-field single off lefty Roenis Elias, also a former big-leaguer, after making outs in his first two at-bats.

RHP Zach Eflin (AAA)
Ho-hum, another dominant start from the Phillies' 22-year-old right-hander speeding toward The Show. Seven more shutout innings from Eflin Tuesday at Pawtucket improved him to 5-0 with a 2.05 ERA in eight starts. He's struck out 45 and walked eight in 52⅔ innings and held his opponents to a .182 batting average. 

Lefties are hitting just .191 against Eflin with one extra-base hit in 71 plate appearances. In fact, he's allowed just seven extra-base hits all season, or one every 28.3 plate appearances. 

Eflin's 0.80 WHIP leads the International League.

The 6-6 sinkerballer just continues to go deep into games and pitch low-stress innings. In his last three starts, Eflin has pitched 21 innings and allowed one run on just 10 hits. He's walked one batter each game and struck out 17. He's been very efficient, averaging 14.7 pitches per inning.

Eflin is six months younger than Aaron Nola, who debuted with the Phillies last season a month after turning 22. Eflin could follow suit this summer. If he keeps rattling off performances like this, he could eventually crack the Phillies' rotation. A spot would open if a pitcher is injured, if Jeremy Hellickson is traded, if Adam Morgan struggles or if the Phillies limit Vince Velasquez's innings.

RHP Jake Thompson (AAA)
Thompson gave up three solo home runs in his most recent start last Friday, but those were the only three runs he allowed over eight innings. He put only three other men on base over those eight frames and struck out eight.

After allowing 13 earned runs in his first four starts, Thompson has given up just four in his last four. He has a 1.33 ERA and a .172 opponents' batting average over that span, and his groundball rate has risen from 35 percent to 48 percent.

The homers Thompson allowed last Friday were to former big-leaguers Casey McGehee, Tyler Collins and Chad Huffman. Collins' was the last and came with two outs in the eighth inning to tie a game the IronPigs won on a walk-off error.

After Huffman's leadoff homer in the second, which came on a fastball high and right down the middle, Thompson really began hitting spots, jamming lefties and executing a bunch of two-seam fastballs that broke low and in to righties.

In eight starts with Lehigh Valley, Thompson is 2-4 with a 3.33 ERA, a 1.13 WHIP, 7.4 strikeouts per nine innings and 2.7 walks.

RHP Mark Appel (AAA)
Though Appel was having some early-season success in his first year in the Phillies' system, the number of men he was putting on base and stranding foretold some eventual regression and that's been the case his last four starts. Appel recorded just two outs on Sunday before exiting for Lehigh Valley.

Appel's velocity was down to the 88 to 90 mph range, which is problematic given the relative flatness of his fastball. If he's sitting in that range he is going to get hit around, period. 

The trouble began when he walked Anthony Gose on a full count to start the game. Dixon Machado followed with a double down the left-field line on a high, 88 mph fastball. After a groundout, Appel hung a curveball that was nearly hit out of the park by Huffman for an RBI double. Three of the next four batters reached and Appel was removed for Severino Gonzalez, having allowed four runs on four hits and two walks in just two-thirds of an inning. 

There was just nothing special about Appel's stuff. His velocity early in games had been 93 to 95 mph, which helped him avoid allowing any runs in the first inning prior to last weekend. But if you were to just arrive at the ballpark Sunday and watch Appel without knowing his name, you'd have never guessed he was a former first overall pick. Is it fair to mention his draft status after each start? Probably not, but that's part of the deal when you get taken first overall and make all that money before reaching the bigs. Appel is aware of that and doesn't fight it — he's learned to accept it.

Through eight starts with Lehigh Valley, Appel is 3-3 with a 4.46 ERA and 1.57 WHIP, and he's trending in the wrong direction. Let's put it this way: It's no fluke that he's put 60 men on base in 38⅓ innings.

OF Nick Williams (AAA)
Williams went 0 for 7 with four strikeouts in a 15-inning game for the IronPigs earlier in the week but has hit in all four games since, going 5 for 15 with two doubles and a homer. Good to see him finally striking the ball with authority. Prior to the last three nights, Williams had just one extra-base hit in his previous 33 plate appearances.

The 22-year-old is hitting .262/.289/.409 this season with six doubles, two triples, four home runs, 19 RBIs, seven walks and 38 strikeouts. 

He's holding his own against righties, batting .295 with an .807 OPS, but the left-handed hitting Williams is just 8 for 44 (.182) with one walk and 14 K's against lefties. That continues a theme from last year, when Williams hit .330 against righties and .210 against lefties. 

Perhaps the way Williams is hitting the ball lately is putting him on track for the hot streak he'd love to have. As of now, it's looking like when he does eventually make the majors, he could be broken in as a platoon outfielder against right-handed pitching.

OF Dylan Cozens (AA)
From Williams we go to Cozens, who will not stop crushing the baseball. Since having his 11-game hit streak snapped last Thursday, Cozens has gone 6 for 23 (.261) with three doubles, three homers and 11 RBIs in his last six games. 

The season numbers for the giant lefty are startling: 14 doubles, 13 home runs, 39 RBIs and a .938 OPS in 45 games. Cozens leads the Eastern League in homers and slugging percentage (.587) and is second in doubles and OPS.

Cozens is just 21, but he's powering himself up to Triple A. His success is adding intrigue to the Phillies' future outfield picture.

C Andrew Knapp (AAA)
Knapp is settling back in after a two-week slump, going 6 for 17 with three doubles and a homer in his last five games. The homer came against Tigers lefty prospect Matt Boyd, who went to Detroit from Toronto along with Norris in last summer's David Price trade.

It's pretty apparent that Knapp is going to hit his way up at some point. He has a hit in 12 of his last 13 games, and over the last two seasons is batting .321 with a .574 slugging percentage and 77 RBIs in 90 games combined between Double A and Triple A. 

Knapp is working every day behind the plate to get better defensively. Reading manager Dusty Wathan has said his blocking has improved faster than his throwing. Base stealers are 15 for 18 this season against Knapp, who had Tommy John surgery in 2013.

RHPs Ben Lively, Nick Pivetta (AA)
Lively, the 24-year-old pitcher the Phillies acquired from the Reds for Marlon Byrd prior to the 2015 season, followed up his 12-strikeout effort with a quality start and win on Sunday. He allowed three runs on four hits over six innings to improve to 7-0 with a 1.87 ERA. He's struck out 49 batters in 53 innings and allowed just one home run.

Pivetta, 23, is 4-3 with a 3.99 ERA in nine starts for Reading with 8.7 strikeouts per nine innings. Lively and Pivetta, who was acquired from the Nationals last summer for Jonathan Papelbon, have flown under the radar the first two months because of how many other top prospects the Phils have acquired. But they add to the organization's list of capable young right-handed pitchers.

At some point in the next few years, some of these guys could be shifted to the bullpen. The Phillies won't have enough room in the rotation if most or all of their right-handers pan out.

Remembering the Lindros hit from Stevens 16 years later

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Remembering the Lindros hit from Stevens 16 years later

All it took to end the Flyers career of Eric Lindros was one devastating shoulder to the chin from Scott Stevens.

This day, in 2000, just 7 minutes and 50 seconds into Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final, Stevens, the most intimidating defenseman in New Jersey Devils history, caught Lindros in transition coming across center ice in the Flyer offensive zone … with his head down.

In real time, measured against today’s standards, Stevens’ hit on Lindros is nothing compared to what seems to occur nightly in the NHL at breakneck speed.

The difference is, back then, the Stevens’ hit was deemed legal.

Today, it would draw a five-minute major, game misconduct and possible suspension because the principal point of contact from Stevens’ shoulder was the chin and forehead of Lindros.

Stevens was 6-foot-2, 215 pounds. Lindros was two inches taller — but smaller when he tucked his head down, as he often did when he skated hard and fast. He weighed 25 pounds more. Didn’t matter. Stevens dropped Lindros to the ice and a hush came over the arena now called Wells Fargo Center.

The significance of the hit is obvious. It marked the end of Lindros’ career as a Flyer. Recall, he had missed more than two months because of headaches, and came into the series in Game 6.

The Flyers lost Game 7, 2-1. They lost a series they once led 3-1. And they lost perhaps the greatest power forward of his generation. No player dominated the ice like Lindros. He was unique in that NHL coaches actually had to design game plans around defending him.

Stevens’ hit resulted in Lindros’ sixth concussion as a Flyer, but more significantly, it was his fourth in five months. He would sit out the entire following season with post-concussion syndrome while demanding a trade that would eventually come with the New York Rangers.

Lindros' impact in eight years as a Flyer can’t be understated. He is among the club’s all-time top 10 in goals (290) assists (369) and points (659) and is the third-highest scoring centerman in Flyers history.

Tragically, he was also the NHL’s poster child for post-concussion syndrome. At the time, the Flyers, the league and many neurologists weren’t sure of the ramifications of this medical term, but in coming years, it would become synonymous with head injuries in every sport.

Medically speaking, this remains the biggest impact Lindros had on hockey — he brought much-needed focus to concussions.

Sadly, during his 13-year career, Lindros missed the equivalent of two more seasons because of injuries, most of which were concussion-related.