Must See TV - Reggie White & Jerome Brown: A Football Life

Must See TV - Reggie White & Jerome Brown: A Football Life

Tonight at 10PM the NFL Network will air “Reggie White & Jerome Brown: A Football Life." Tonight at 10PM you should be in front of your television watching “Reggie White & Jerome Brown: A Football Life."

As an Eagles fan that grew up during the Buddy Ryan era, both Reggie and Jerome were larger than life. They combined to form the most devastating defensive end/defensive tackle combination I’ve ever seen.

The front four of White, Brown, Mike Pitts, and Clyde Simmons was relentless. I can still picture the four of them -- #92, #99, #74, and #96 -- down in their stance ready to unleash hell on the opposing offensive line and quarterback. It was plain to see though, that Reggie and Jerome were the most talented of the four.

The two were an unlikely pair. Reggie was a god-fearing man of faith who spoke in a distinctive raspy voice. His tone always measured, befitting his status as an ordained minister. Jerome was a loud anti-authoritarian who would tell you he was going to kick your ass, proceed to kick your ass, and then remind you how thoroughly your ass had just been kicked.

Reggie arrived in Philly in 1985, fresh off a stint with the Memphis Showboats of the USFL. He recorded 31 sacks over his first two seasons in Philly. Two years later, Jerome Brown arrived as a first round pick out of Miami. It was no coincidence that Reggie recorded the highest single season sack total of his career, 21 in just 13 games, during Jerome’s rookie year.

Opposing offenses had to pick their poison. They could double-team Reggie with a tackle and guard, and leave Jerome Brown to work against the center, or they could leave their tackle on an island against Reggie and slide their protection inside to deal with Jerome. Either way, the quarterback was going to get hit.

Buddy Ryan’s defense was predicated on pressure and hitting. Reggie and Jerome were ideally suited to carry out those two tasks. Looking back now, I think I was captivated by the degree and manner in which that defense destroyed people. To put it simply, I was in awe of how badass they were.
I was too young to remember the Broad Street Bullies wreaking havoc on the NHL. The Buddy Ryan Eagles were my Broad Street Bullies. It was the first time I’d ever rooted for the gang of pillaging marauders to win. They’d punch you in the mouth, strip the football, lateral it a few times, and then dance in the end zone while you were wiping the blood off your face. It was exhilarating.

That attitude came from Jerome Brown. Reggie was the superstar, but J.B. was the heart and soul. Mix those two All-Pro talents with the athleticism of Byron Evans, the perpetual scowl and attitude of Seth Joyner (aka Uncle Seth),  the cover ability of Eric Allen, the range of Wes Hopkins, and the nastiness of Andre Waters and you had one of the all-time greatest, hardest hitting, shit talking defenses in NFL history.

Ultimately, Buddy Ryan was unable to win a playoff game as the Eagles head coach. He was replaced by Rich Kotite prior to the 1991 season. The offense was as mismanaged as ever, but Bud Carson stepped into the defensive coordinator position and fine-tuned the defense.

Reggie and Jerome combined for 24 sacks that season, as the Birds became just the fifth team in NFL history to finish #1 in overall defense, #1 against the run, and #1 against the pass. They were set up for years of future success.

That all changed on June 25, 1992 when Jerome Brown was killed in a single car crash in his hometown of Brooksville, Florida. I remember being on the boardwalk in Ocean City, NJ when I heard the news. I felt the same pit in my stomach as I did when I learned Pelle Lindbergh died. Athletes weren’t supposed to die like that.

The entire 1992 season was a tribute to Jerome Brown. The Eagles wore #99 J.B. patches on their jerseys. Seth Joyner shaved #99 into the back of his flat-top fade. For one of the few times his tenure as owner of the Eagles Norman Braman actually did the right thing and retired Jerome’s #99 prior to the home opener. The Eagles would break their pregame huddle with “1, 2, 3, J.B.!” The rallying cry for the season became “Bring it home for Jerome."

They managed to go 11-5 and actually win a playoff game before falling to Dallas in the Divisional Playoffs. The loss to Dallas marked the final time Reggie White wore an Eagles uniform.

1993 was the first year of NFL Free Agency. Norman Braman wanted no parts of spending any money and, bit by bit, the Eagles were dismantled. Reggie White signed with Green Bay, apparently never having received an offer from the Eagles.

I suppose it was somewhat fitting that Reggie left Philadelphia just one year removed from Jerome Brown’s death. He mourned and honored his friend here, in the city where they meet, before moving on and ultimately winning a Super Bowl with the Packers.

Like Jerome Brown, Reggie White died way too young. White, who was just 43 years old, passed away in 2004.

For Philadelphia fans the two men will always be linked. They are fondly remembered for ushering in an era of dominating defensive football.

NFL to reopen investigation into Giants' Brown for domestic violence


NFL to reopen investigation into Giants' Brown for domestic violence

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The NFL is going to re-open its investigation of New York Giants placekicker Josh Brown after police released journal entries and emails in which he admitted that he verbally and physically abused his former wife.

The NFL issued a statement on Thursday saying the league's investigators made repeated verbal and written attempts to obtain any and all evidence and relevant information in the May 2015 case from the King County Sheriff's Office in Washington, but were denied.

The sheriff's office released the journals and emails late Wednesday to SportsNet New York.

The league said law enforcement's response limited its yearlong investigation of the domestic abuse incident that led to Brown's arrest on suspicion of domestic violence. No charges were filed against the 37-year-old player.

"We concluded our own investigation, more than a year after the initial incident, based on the facts and evidence available to us at the time and after making exhaustive attempts to obtain information in a timely fashion," the league said. "It is unfortunate that we did not have the benefit or knowledge of these materials at the time."

Brown, who was suspended by the NFL Brown for the opening game of the season for a violation of its personal conduct policy, practice on Thursday but he was not in the locker room afterward as the team prepared to leave for its game against the Los Angeles Rams in London on Sunday.

Tom Quinn, the Giants' special teams coach, said that Brown remains the Giants kicker. He said that any change in Brown's status would have to be made by someone above him.

That could be the league or the Giants, who have not issued a statement on the latest revelations.

"In light of the release of these documents yesterday, we will thoroughly review the additional information and determine next steps in the context of the NFL Personal Conduct Policy," the league said. "We will not be making any comments on potential discipline until that time."

Giants spokesman Corry Rush declined comment Thursday.

"I have physically, mentally, emotionally and verbally been a repulsive man," Brown wrote in one journal entry. "I have abused my wife."

The journal was part of was part of 165 pages of documents that were turned over to authorities by Brown's former wife, Molly, after his arrest. She had accused him of more than 20 instances of domestic violence.

One of the documents dated more than two years before Brown's arrest was called a "Contract for Change" and appeared to be signed by both the kicker and his former wife.

"I have controlled her by making her feel less human than me, and manipulated her with money," said one of the eight items in the list. "I have disregarded my stepsons' feelings and they have witnessed me abusing their mother."

In a 2013 email, Brown said he caused his wife to fear him.

"From the bruise on your leg when we argued ... to the zipper that caught you last April. I am ashamed and disgraced to call myself a husband," Brown said.

Brown is one of the top placekickers in the NFL. He scored a career-high 134 points last season. He has made 11 of 12 field goal attempts this season and all eight extra points.

Report: Sixers have shown interest in Timberwolves PG Tyus Jones

Report: Sixers have shown interest in Timberwolves PG Tyus Jones

With Ben Simmons and Jerryd Bayless hurt, the Sixers are still lacking a distributor, and so it makes sense that they've been in contact with the point guard-rich Timberwolves.

According to Adrian Wojnarowski of The Vertical, the Sixers and New Orleans Pelicans have shown interest in T'wolves backup point guard Tyus Jones. 

With fifth overall pick Kris Dunn and Ricky Rubio, Minnesota is set at PG. Jones, 20, is third on the totem pole a year after being drafted 24th overall. 

According to Wojnarowski, the Timberwolves are more inclined to trade Jones than Rubio. 

Jones has a connection to the Sixers in Jahlil Okafor, a former teammate at Duke. Both were one-and-dones for the 2014-15 National Championship team. Jones averaged 11.8 points, 3.5 rebounds and 5.6 assists for the Blue Devils. 

He played sparingly as a rookie last season with Minnesota (37 games), averaging 4.2 points and 2.9 assists in 15.5 minutes, but stood out this summer, winning Las Vegas Summer League MVP.

T.J. McConnell has started the majority of the preseason at point guard for the Sixers. Sergio Rodriguez got the nod in the last game against the Pistons. Brett Brown is also looking at Nik Stauskas to fill the spot in a non-traditional role.