No, Jason Peters Should Not Get a Suspension for Driving Really Fast

No, Jason Peters Should Not Get a Suspension for Driving Really Fast

The Eagles are making a seamless transition from non-controversy controversy season into the players’ summer vacations. Those who are not making themselves available for dissection interview are free to enjoy leisure activities until training camp opens on July 22.

Jason Peters’ activity of choice: underground drag racing. (If I could force you to listen to the original Fast and the Furious soundtrack while you read this post, I would.)

Peters was arrested early Wednesday morning for participating in an illegal street race and resisting arrest by flight, aka not pulling over right away. Per the police report, Peters for some reason raced a sedan in his Camaro, and did not stop immediately for the officer. Here’s the story from a local paper:

According to the arrest affidavit, Deputy L. Deal observed a white Camaro and blue sedan at the red light of U.S. 165 North and Central Street. When the light turned green, the Camaro and sedan accelerated and appeared to be racing.

The deputy activated the emergency lights and attempted to pull over the vehicles. The driver of the sedan immediately pulled over, but Peters, who was driving the Camaro, accelerated to a high rate of speed, exited U.S. 165 North and proceeded eastbound on Interstate 20.

The Camaro exceeded speeds of 100 mph while the deputy was in pursuit. The Camaro then exited Interstate 20 at the Pecanland Mall exit. The Camaro finally stopped at the parking lot of 4209 Pecanland Mall Drive — the address for the shopping center that includes Target and Petco.

The deputy told to Peters to get out of the vehicle, with which he complied. The driver handcuffed, arrested and transported to Ouachita Correctional Center and booked on charges of drag racing and resisting by flight.

And now a The700Level EXCLUSIVE, here are Peters’ official comments after the arrest.

You almost had me? You never had me - you never had your car... Granny shiftin' not double clutchin' like you should. You're lucky that hundred shot of NOS didn't blow the welds on the intake! You almost had me?

Wow. I did not realize he was in that deep. No word on whether he went back to collect the sedan driver’s pink slip.

Because some folks on Twitter were wondering about the possibility of an NFL suspension for Peters, we researched similar traffic incidents among pro football players. There is certainly precedent for driving extremely fast – notable players who have been ticketed for driving over 100 mph include Plaxico Burress and Adrian Peterson – but those examples don’t necessarily involve street racing, followed up with a subsequent attempt to evade police.

Still, I wouldn’t expect NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to get involved here. Nobody was hurt, and neither drugs nor alcohol were involved. It’s a traffic violation with a “resisting arrest” tacked on for failure to yield, a charge that might be even be dropped since Peters eventually cooperated. Dumb incident, one Eagles fans should be grateful did not end in tragedy, but not the type of illicit behavior that warrants suspension.

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Report: Sixers 'will take a hard look' at Jrue Holiday in free agency

Has The Process come full circle?

The Sixers "will take a hard look" at point guard Jrue Holiday in free agency, according to ESPN's Zach Lowe

Holiday, of course, was the Sixers' starting PG from 2009-13, before he was traded on draft night by then-GM Sam Hinkie for Nerlens Noel and a future first-round pick (which became Elfrid Payton, who was traded for Dario Saric).

In four seasons since, Holiday has averaged 15.3 points, 3.4 rebounds, 6.8 assists and 1.4 steals for the Pelicans. He's fought injury and missed 122 games since joining New Orleans.

The Pelicans have Anthony Davis but little else. They're going to need to make some tough decisions moving forward and one will be with Holiday.

As Lowe points out, there aren't many teams in need of a point guard — he lists the Sixers, Kings, Knicks and maybe the Magic as players for a PG in free agency.

"[Holiday] fits what [the Sixers] need around Ben Simmons, and the hilariousness of Philly bringing Holiday back after flipping him to start The Process is irresistible," Lowe writes.

Holiday has never been a great three-point shooter but he's been decent from long-range his entire career, topping out at 39 percent and sitting at 36.8 percent over eight NBA seasons.

He's coming off a four-year, $41 million contract, and although he has a lengthy injury history, he'll still command a nice-sized contract in free agency, especially with the cap expected to increase again.