One Eagles Fan's Amazing 9-TV Man Cave

One Eagles Fan's Amazing 9-TV Man Cave

You likely watch the Eagles every Sunday. If you're like most fans, you likely watch them in your living room which has one pretty nice television in it like most warm blooded Americans.

Level reader and diehard Eagles fan Brent Blanchard is not your average fan. Not only did Brent send in photos of his nine television setup in his man cave located in Medford Lakes, NJ, complete with wet bar and beermeister, he also sent along a 3-page PDF file describing his ridiculous setup in incredible detail.

Oh, and he says he has actual field goal posts from the Vet.

"The football goalposts that book-end the monitor wall are the actual uprights used in the west endzone of Veterans Stadium by the Eagles, and are positioned at regulation NFL width of 18.5 feet apart," Brent writes. "I dragged these to my car during a demo crew lunch break (the south goalposts were crushed into a dumpster a few minutes later)."

Amazing. [more photos below]

Here's a sampling of his description:


The video wall is the centerpiece of the 400 sq. ft. Control Room. Eight 24” monitors surround a 55” center unit. Each monitor has 4w external speakers and is mounted to moveable boom arms allowing them to pull outward and rotate 90 degrees in all directions (useful for video gaming or closer viewing). Space was allowed for eventual upgrade of the center monitor to 70”.

The monitor bank is justified left-of-center on the wall, a) to align with the room entrance, and b) to allow Wii gamers space for arm-swinging that’s generally not required for the Xbox. Floor-level chairs set close to these monitors allow gamers to optimize viewing angles


Video Sources

Integrating various types of video sources was the most challenging part of the Control Room’s construction. I established HDMI as the base format, which required all other formats to be converted. Of the 29 electronic items involved (9 monitors, 4 switchers, 16 source inputs), 16 have integrated HDMI connectors. The other 13 possess composite, component, RF or VGI outputs, which require a host of signal converters working furiously under the monitor bank.

Because every item above requires its own power, a total of 43 electronic components are being powered within the large black boxes under the monitors. (Factor in the 17 room lights and surround system, and the room draws some juice!) But that’s what was required to allow every component to transfer seamlessly, which in turn allows for displaying up to nine of the following video sources with the touch of a button:

Recordable Verizon Fios box #1
Recordable Verizon Fios box #2
Recordable Verizon Fios box #3
Direct TV receiver w’ NFL
Dell online #6
Dell online #8, both w’ wireless keyboard & mouse
Live Turtle Cam with remote control
Live 151 CCTV Cams
XBOX console
Wii console
BluRay player
DVD player
DVD player #2
VHS player
Sony FX1 hd tape cam
Sony G55 hd drive cam

The two Dell computers are hard-wired with dedicated cat5’s to maximize bandwidth for live events. But they also perform other functions:
The top unit (#6) is configured for:

A. Primary ESPN3 sports matrix
B. Live outbound streaming of Turtle Cam video at
C. Pan/zoom the live video feed from roof of LBI condo
D. Primary Fantasy Team live scoring
E. Primary web access

The bottom unit (#8) is configured for:

A. Listening to music db of over 75k songs. Guests can easily create playlists in Itunes jukebox.
B. Secondary ESPN3 sports matrix
C. Secondary Fantasy Team live scoring
D. Secondary web access

That's not even getting into the power setup, the audio setup, the lighting setup, the photography setup, the artifact setup, etc.

Oh, and in addition to all of the electronics, the "Control Room" as Brent calls it also has a gaming area complete with regulation bubble hockey, foosball, knee hockey, and darts. "It also features a relaxation area with oversized sofa and chairs which opens out to the rear porch, back yard and lake," he writes.

The lake is a nice touch.

We salute your amazing efforts and have only one other question.

Can we be friends?

Got a decent TV setup of your own for watching Philly sports on? Show us!

Eagles-Vikings 5 things: Game much bigger than Sam Bradford's return

Eagles-Vikings 5 things: Game much bigger than Sam Bradford's return

Eagles vs. Vikings
1 p.m. on FOX

Eagles +3

A familiar face comes to town on Sunday when the Eagles host the Vikings, the NFL's last unbeaten team at 5-0.

There's more to this matchup than a certain jilted quarterback returning to Lincoln Financial Field though. After an inspired 3-0 start, the Eagles have come out flat in two consecutive games, both losses. If this squad has any hope of getting back on track in Week 7, they can't afford to focus on the high-profile former teammate in purple sleeves.

Grinding it out
How good is the Vikings' defense? Even though they're ranked fourth in the league against the run and eighth in yards per carry allowed, they've faced the second-highest number of rushing attempts. Simply put, between a fierce pass-rush and ball-hawking secondary, offenses are afraid to put the ball in the air against this team.

Opponents have decided the best way to beat the Minnesota defense is by keeping the ball on the ground — shorten the game, try to create manageable third downs and play the field position game. Of course, the best way for the Eagles to beat Washington's 28th-ranked run defense last week, with a fifth-round rookie right tackle making his first career start mind you, also would've been to hand the ball off early and often, which wasn't exactly the game plan that we saw.

As good as Carson Wentz is, the Eagles probably aren't going to beat this team by airing the ball out. It may be inefficient and look ugly, but this time, head coach Doug Pederson needs to lean on the ground attack and take the pressure off of his first-year quarterback and tackle. Otherwise, a Vikings defense that ranks third in the NFL in sacks and fourth in interceptions can take this game over.

Self-inflicted wounds
Ticky-tack calls or not, you can't blame the judgment of the officials for all of the penalties the Eagles have taken the past two weeks. Last week in Washington, they drew 13 flags for 114 yards. The week before, it was 14 flags for 111 yards. Is it really any coincidence in two losses the Eagles have been penalized 27 times for 225 yards? Unlikely.

Were one or two or even a handful of those calls excessive? Have officials missed some potential calls that could have gone the other way? Yes and yes, as is always the case. When it's that many penalties for that many yards though, you can only place so much blame on the refs.

Simply put, the players need to clean up their acts. According to, the Eagles are committing the most penalties per game at 9.8. Only one other team is above 9.0. All excuses aside, the Eagles lack discipline right now, and it's hard to beat anybody when they are continuously shooting themselves in the foot, let alone the only undefeated squad in football.

No gimmes
There is no bigger indicator of winning and losing in the NFL than turnovers. So what happens when the two teams who cough the ball up the least are going head-to-head?

One thing the Eagles did correct in Washington was the little giveaway problem that cost them the game in Detroit. After losing their first fumble and throwing their first interception of the season in the final three minutes of their loss at Detroit, the offense went back to playing turnover-free football on Sunday, one of the positive things that could be said for the performance.

Yet the only team that's committed fewer turnovers than the Eagles is the Vikings, who have just one through five games. The ball security these clubs have displayed is remarkable bordering on unheard of. So what happens when the unstoppable force meets the immovable object? The first one to blink, or in this case make a mistake, might just cost themselves the game in what could be a tightly contested tilt.

Just a pit stop
If it feels like the Eagles' 34-3 romp of the Steelers at the Linc was a long time ago, well, it has been almost a month. Since then, there's been a bye week followed by trips to Detroit and Washington, putting the last home game at exactly four weeks ago.

Don't get used to the feeling either. After their game against the Vikings on Sunday, the Eagles go back on the road for two contests against the division rival Cowboys and Giants.

What does it all mean? Besides a travel-heavy stretch, it suggests this sandwich game with the Vikings is an especially significant spot on the Eagles' schedule, particularly given the slow starts they've jumped out to as the visiting team of late. That can't be blamed entirely on going on the road of course, but it certainly hasn't helped. Vikings or not, the Eagles could use a positive showing on Sunday before they go away again.

The Bradford Bowl
You didn't really think we were going to completely gloss over Sam Bradford, did you? Not even mention his name?

It's interesting, because right now, the trade that sent Bradford to the Vikings and cleared the way for Wentz to start at quarterback for the Eagles looks like a win-win. Both head coaches agreed with that sentiment as well. Mike Zimmer says Bradford gave the Vikings an energy back after starter Teddy Bridgewater was lost for the season with an improbable injury, while despite coming back down to earth a bit the last two weeks, it's obvious the Eagles' future is bright with Wentz.

That being said, there are some additional bragging rights at stake for both signal-callers this week, whether they acknowledge it or not. If the Eagles win, it shows their gamble on Wentz being prepared to start right away was justified. If the Vikings win, pundits could argue the Eagles never should've traded Bradford in the first place.

These are only narratives of course, and the Eagles' investment in Wentz and the Vikings' desperation trade for Bradford are both left to be judged somewhere down the road, long after this game has been played. Nonetheless, the result on Sunday is sure to spark some interesting debate in the coming days.

Penn State upsets No. 2 Ohio State, 24-21

Penn State upsets No. 2 Ohio State, 24-21


STATE COLLEGE – As his team slogged through back-to-back 7-6 seasons in his first two years as Penn State’s head coach, Langhorne native James Franklin heard time and again that he was in need of a signature victory.

Now he has one, even if he refuses to admit it.

Junior cornerback Grant Haley returned a blocked field goal 60 yards for the go-ahead touchdown with 4:27 left as the Nittany Lions stunned second-ranked Ohio State 24-21 on Saturday night.

“That’s for you (media) guys, all that signature stuff,” Franklin said.

Not exactly.

“It’s just a game that put Penn State back on the map,” Haley said. “We needed that signature win, and we did it tonight.”

The fans stormed the field after the Lions, 5-2 after their third straight victory this season, beat a ranked team for the first time since 2013 (Wisconsin). It was also PSU’s first victory over a team ranked in the top five since 1999 (Arizona) and its first over a team slotted as high as No. 2 since 1990 (Notre Dame).

Ohio State (7-1) saw winning streaks of 20 straight road games and 17 straight Big Ten road games come to an end, despite building a 21-7 lead through three quarters.

The Lions whisked 90 yards in five plays to cut the gap to seven with 13:32 left in the game, with quarterback Trace McSorley running two yards for the TD.

Freshman linebacker Cam Brown then blocked Cameron Johnston’s punt to set up a 34-yard field goal by Tyler Davis with 9:33 remaining, making it 21-17.

Ohio State mounted a drive behind J.T. Barrett, their splendid quarterback, moving from its own 13 to the PSU 28. Barrett’s 34-yard connection with wide receiver Noah Brown was the big play.

But the Buckeyes stalled, and Tyler Durbin came on to attempt a 45-yard field goal. Penn State safety Marcus Allen made a leaping block, however, and Haley scooped up the bouncing ball and beat Durbin and Johnston, the holder, down the left sideline for the go-ahead score.

Ohio State’s final drive of the night ended with a pair of Penn State sacks, the last a combined effort by defensive linemen Kevin Givens and Evan Schwan with 1:02 left.

When the final gun sounded, several Penn State players sprinted toward the south end zone and launched themselves into the front row of the stands, Lambeau Leap-style, among the delirious students. And thousands of fans, all clad in white for PSU’s traditional White Out, flooded the field.

“This is for everybody,” Franklin said later. “This community’s been through so much in the last five years (a reference to the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal and its aftermath), and this is a big step in the right direction, in terms of healing. I said very, very early on that for us to get where we want to be, we need this entire community together, and a win like tonight – I know I’m biased – but I believe that football has the ability to bring a community together like nothing else.”

Moments later, he caught himself and said he “didn’t want to spend a lot of time talking about the big picture.”

Rather, he added, “I just want to enjoy tonight.”