Per Freddie Mitchell, Eagles lost Super Bowl thanks to Harrison's HGH use, McNabb's 's***ty a**' arm

Per Freddie Mitchell, Eagles lost Super Bowl thanks to Harrison's HGH use, McNabb's 's***ty a**' arm

Freddie Mitchell of the Philadelphia Eagles, left, speaks during a press conference at Harvard Business School as fellow NFL players listen in, from left to right, Todd Collins of the Kansas City Chiefs, Dhani Jones of the Philadelphia Eagles, Ted Johnson of the New England Patriots and Greg Comella of the Tampa Bay Bucs. Harvard Business School has developed a workshop focusing on the needs of NFL players interested in owning, operating, or building their own businesses, Thursday, April 7, 2005. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger)

A not-so-great former athlete with an outlandish sense of self who can't seem to stay out of trouble, on social media and otherwise. Where have I heard this before? Like, really recently?

Freddie Mitchell -- best known for his great hands, but most recently known for a tax fraud scheme and having seven pounds of marijuana delivered to both a restaurant he co-owns and his grandmother's house -- decided to go off on Rodney Harrison on Facebook this weekend.

You may remember Eytan Shander, who used to do talk radio on WIP. He now hosts a show with Amani Toomer on NBC Sports Radio -- the same station that employs one Donovan McNabb -- and Harrison, the former New England Patriots safety, is a recurring guest.

Shander and Harrison were addressing last week's Jim Irsay controversy/not-controversy about whether the Colts' owner was potentially ungrateful for Peyton Manning's years of service in Indianapolis, and Harrison decided to draw a comparison to the 2005 Super Bowl between the Eagles and Pats.

Harrison said Mitchell's trash talking of the New England secondary prior to the game only helped to motivate the Pats' defense, which came away with three interceptions of McNabb. Shander joked that Philly always "knew" Freddie Mitchell was the real "reason" the Eagles lost that game, and the whole thing is pretty harmless ...

... To everyone but FredEx apparently. Because he just lost it on Saturday all over Shander's Facebook page, blaming McNabb for having a "shitty ass arm" and going into a long consideration of Harrison's past with HGH. Enjoy:

Agreed, Tyrone.

Temple Men’s Basketball adds two players to 2016-17 roster

Temple Men’s Basketball adds two players to 2016-17 roster

Temple men’s basketball coach Fran Dunphy announced that the team has added two players to its 2016-17 roster. 

The Owls will announce the two new transfers, junior’s Isaiah Lewis and Steve Leonard, Thursday night at the Liacouras Center at the team’s Cherry and White Night. 

Lewis comes to Temple after playing for Casper College in Wyoming last season, where he averaged 5.5 points and 2.2 assists per game. Before his stint at Casper College, the 6-4 guard also played at Lee Junior College in Texas, and averaged 10.0 points and 4.7 assists per game.

Leonard, a 6-6 guard from Collegeville, Pa., played two seasons at Ursinus College. He averaged 5.6 points over 43 games during his career at Ursinus. 

Brett Brown: Sixers' Nik Stauskas set for 'breakout year'

Brett Brown: Sixers' Nik Stauskas set for 'breakout year'

CAMDEN, N.J. — The irony of Nik Stauskas’ reputation as a three-point shooter is that he doesn’t view himself that way.

Stauskas was drafted eighth overall by the Kings in 2014 after shooting 44.1 percent from three over two years at Michigan. But that’s not how he envisioned himself being in the pros.

“It’s crazy,” Stauskas said after practice Thursday. “I know I was a great shooter coming out of Michigan, but I don’t consider myself a shooter. I consider myself a gamer. I don’t think I’m an effective NBA player when I just stand and spot up and shoot threes. That’s really not my game.”

Stauskas has struggled to find offensive consistency in the NBA. The third-year two-guard averaged 32.4 percent from long range in his first two seasons. He wasn’t reliable as a knockdown shooter and bounced in and out of the starting lineup last season.

Rather than being a finesse player, Brett Brown encouraged Stauskas to get aggressive. Brown wanted to a see an edge from Stauskas and not hold back at the basket.

Stauskas displayed that side to his game on opening night against the Thunder. In 23 minutes off the bench, he scored 13 points on 5-for-6 shooting. His only miss came on a three-point attempt. His 83.3 shooting percentage was a single-game career high.

“He was cocky,” Brown said. “He was in attack mode. He was not afraid to put it to the floor and get to the rim. I feel like he’s got a real chance to have a breakout year. We need him to have a breakout year.”

The Sixers picked up the options on Stauskas, Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor on Thursday.

“I think the statement the club made on his contract lets him probably have a little bit more comfort on what we think of him,” Brown said. “I was really happy with his swagger last night.”

Stauskas is figuring out his role on the Sixers this season. It is one that can change often given injuries. A key to being successful, whether he is on the perimeter or at the rim, is feeling confident and in a rhythm on the floor.

“I had fun out there,” Stauskas said. “More than anything, I think yesterday was the first time in a while that I’ve really enjoyed myself out there and had a smile on my face.”