PHOTO: Donovan McNabb Finally Hoists Championship Trophy, Ryan Lochte Is Involved

PHOTO: Donovan McNabb Finally Hoists Championship Trophy, Ryan Lochte Is Involved

Look at it. I mean, really LOOK at it. Isn't it beautiful?

The years it took. The criticism he endured.

Donovan McNabb has won the big one.

That's right — The American Honey Kickball Classic.

So apparently there's something called ZogSports, which "is a charity focused co-ed social sports league in large urban markets across the United States."

We played in an indoor bocce league at The Fieldhouse once, but I don't think there was any charity involved. Just some beer.

If you're unfamiliar with American Honey, it's a fine product made by the people at Wild Turkey.

Anywho, one of ZogSports' most recent activities was a kickball tournament in Times Square, featuring Donovan McNabb and this guy Ryan Lochte, whom people really seem to dislike. Here's a picture of the two of them together:

And another of Donovan with trophy:

Jeah, to answer your question, this was fun for me.


Forget Torrey Smith, Eagles should go after Alshon Jeffery


Forget Torrey Smith, Eagles should go after Alshon Jeffery

The Eagles offense has lacked a consistent deep threat since 2014, a role Torrey Smith could potentially fill. Smith's career 17.2 yards per reception are second only to DeSean Jackson among active players, so it makes sense vice president of football operations Howie Roseman would contact the 1-6 49ers about the wide receiver's availability.

The problem with Smith is he's a bit of a one-trick pony in that regard. Even when the 27-year-old could benefit from competent quarterback play, he wasn't a star. In four seasons with the Ravens from 2011 through '14, Smith averaged 53 receptions, 898 yards and 7.5 touchdowns. That kind of production might look good on the Eagles, especially if the price is right, but it's just adding yet another number-two receiver to the mix.

Not like, say, if the Eagles were to trade for Alshon Jeffery. CBS Sports' Jason La Canfora was just throwing the idea out there, noting that Roseman is always working the phones and the Bears are 1-6 as well. That being said, if the Eagles are going to trade for a receiver at this point, they might as well go for the guy who could actually solve their problem.

There are concerns, of course. First and foremost, Jeffery is a free agent at season's end, although the Eagles could begin ironing out a contract extension immediately, and if all else fails, the franchise tag would be at their disposal while they work out a new deal. And while he hasn't missed a game yet in 2016, the fifth-year veteran continues to be nagged by injuries, which is certainly something to monitor.

But when healthy and part of an offense that's firing on all cylinders, Jeffery looks like a transcendent talent. In 2013, his second season in the league, he racked up 89 receptions for 1,421 yards and seven touchdowns en route to the Pro Bowl. His follow-up campaign only went for 85 catches, 1,133 yards, 10 scores, but that still bests any year Smith has ever had in the NFL. Last season, Jeffery managed 54 catches for 807 yards and four touchdowns despite only playing in nine games.

As you can tell from the numbers, Jeffery isn't merely a deep threat. The 26-year-old can get down the field with 4.4 speed, then use his 6-foot-3, 218-pound frame to box out defenders. With that size advantage, Jeffery has also proven to be a weapon on short and intermediate routes, as well as in the red zone, which has been another trouble spot for the Eagles.

Jeffery is going to waste in Chicago. With Brian Hoyer at the helm for most of the first seven games, the wide receiver has 32 catches for 520 yards, but no touchdowns. Regardless, that's still on pace to put him over 1,000 yards quite easily, and with Jay Cutler returning from injury this week, Jeffery will have a chance to showcase his talents for a potential trade.

Should the Eagles be on board? The price no doubt will be steep. Then again, they would be getting a known quantity, unlike if they tried to find their solution in the NFL draft, and unlike Smith, a nice complementary receiver, Jeffery is the kind of wideout who has proven he can absolutely dominate at this level under the right circumstances.

Pairing Jeffery with Carson Wentz sounds like it could be the right circumstance to me.

I don't normally get behind this kind of sensational trade conjecture, but going big on Jeffery is more logical to me than Smith. One is a bandage, the other a game-changer. The cost would be great, both in terms of draft picks and the new multi-year deal the Eagles immediately would want to award Jeffery. The risk could be so worth it though when Jeffery and Wentz both become perennial Pro Bowlers.

Union plan to lean on Brian Carroll, who's back in playoffs for 10th time

Union plan to lean on Brian Carroll, who's back in playoffs for 10th time

CHESTER, Pa. — Five years ago, there were few certainties in MLS ... but one of them was Brian Carroll making the playoffs.

From his first season in the league in 2003 all the way through 2011, Carroll’s teams got into the postseason every single year, leading then-Union manager Peter Nowak to quip, on the cusp of Philly’s first-ever postseason game, “That’s why we got him — because he never misses the playoffs.” 

But then things, um, changed.

Carroll himself remained a consistent player for the most part, but all around him, the Union were shook by turbulence, missing out on the playoffs in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, sometimes in crushing fashion, other times by a country mile.

Now, five years later, as the Union prepare to return to the postseason with Wednesday’s knockout round matchup in Toronto (7:30 p.m., ESPN2), Carroll is the only Union player left from the team’s last playoff squad in 2011. And you can be sure his playoff streak followed by his playoff drought makes the return trip that much more gratifying for one of the league’s longest-tenured players.

“I had a great run to start my career qualifying for the playoffs, carrying that through up to here,” the 35-year-old midfielder said. “But it hasn’t been easy of late. It’s a great feeling having accomplished that goal of getting back into the playoffs. Now that’s in the past and it’s already about what we can do and how well we can play and try to get a win, try to keep it going.”

With Maurice Edu officially on the shelf until 2017 and Warren Creavalle also nursing an injury, Brian Carroll will likely start in the defensive midfield, just as he did when the Union were swept out of the playoffs by the Houston Dynamo in the 2011 Eastern Conference Semifinals. And he’ll play a critical role, shielding a young backline matching up against a star-studded attack that features two of the league’s top offensive players in Sebastian Giovinco and Jozy Altidore.

Perhaps just as importantly, Carroll will bring a veteran, winning presence to the lineup. During his stretch of making the playoffs in nine straight seasons — three shy of the MLS record — he captured championships with D.C. and Columbus, meaning he’s one of the only players on the team who knows what it’s like to win in the MLS postseason.

“Brian has been a guy who’s done it and won championships and lifted trophies,” Union head coach Jim Curtin said. “It was a long absence for him. There are a lot of guys in our locker room that have been in the league for a long time that have never been on a team that’s made the playoffs. It’s a new experience for a lot of guys. Brian will fall in the category of a guy I’ll lean on to talk with those guys and tell them what it’s like, what happens when that first whistle blows — and to really embrace the moment because you never know when you’re gonna be back.”

What will Carroll try to tell the young guys based on his past experiences?

“Everything is more intense,” Carroll said. “Everything is heightened. Just go out there and play without any fear. Play as best we can — connect passes, create chances, make defensive plays, play solid, control your emotions, but use the playoff adrenaline in a positive way. Put everything we have and lay it all out there. It’s one game and you never know what can happen, so hopefully we can go out there and play together and get something done.”

While it’s certainly true anything can happen in an elimination game, it’s also true that few people will think the Union can go up to Canada and beat a Toronto team that, despite stumbling to the finish, remains a top contender to win the MLS Cup. And given the Union’s history and the fact that they’re winless in their last seven games, that will make for an even bigger upset if the Union can return with a victory.

But even if just getting to the playoffs is an accomplishment for the franchise, Carroll knows winning the club’s first-ever playoff game would be a far greater one.

“It’s good to be back in the playoffs,” Carroll said. “We have a chance in the second season to come together and do something that maybe nobody is giving us much of a chance to. We’re going to go up there and do the best we can and enjoy the opportunity. Hopefully we’re able to accomplish something that nobody’s expecting right now.”

Once upon a time, everyone expected Carroll to be in the playoffs. But, as he says, sometimes it’s just as much fun doing things nobody expects.

That can happen Wednesday for a team that’s never won a playoff game and for a player who continues to turn back the clock every day as retirement draws closer and closer.

“It’s never a given,” Carroll said. “It’s a lot more difficult to accomplish this feat with more teams and better competition. But I think it’s a real positive step for our club and a good building block to do what we’ve done in accomplishing [making] the playoffs this year. Now it’s about taking the opportunity as best we can.”