Report: No Franchise Tag for Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie

Report: No Franchise Tag for Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie

The NFL opened its two-week window for teams to apply the
franchise tag on an impending free agent on Monday, but according to Geoff
Mosher the Eagles will not use the device this year. Of the club’s seven free
agents, only Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie merits consideration, but sources tell
Mosher a guaranteed one-year deal at $10.7 million is too expensive.

The franchise tag is often used as a bridge to a long-term
extension, but in Rodgers-Cromartie’s case it probably behooves him to sign at
that price. $10.7 million represents the average salaries of the top-five
highest-paid cornerbacks in the league.

The Eagles may still attempt to re-sign DRC, who arrived in Philadelphia
as a key component of the trade that sent Kevin Kolb to Arizona. He’s had a
rocky two-year tenure however. The former first-round pick spent most of 2011
as the nickel corner, a position he was ill-suited for. Back on the outside
last season, he flashed Pro Bowl potential, but it appeared at times that he
lost interest.

Rodgers-Cromartie had three interceptions and started all 16
games in ’12. No question he has the skill set to be an elite cornerback in the
NFL. While he avoids contact and has been accused of giving up on plays, few
players at that position possess his combination of size, speed, and instinct.

Another organization may be willing to pony up some serious
coin for that potential though if it were to hit the market. Meanwhile, cornerback is an area of serious concern
for the Birds. The other starter, Nnamdi Asomugha, is due $15 million this year,
but his play has been nowhere near commensurate of his salary and makes him a candidate for release. Brandon Boykin,
Brandon Hughes, and Curtis Marsh were the other CBs on the roster last season.

The Eagles previously used the franchise tag on DeSean
Jackson (’12) and Mike Vick (’11), both of whom obviously signed long-term
extensions.

Overall, you can’t really blame the front office for their
trepidation over handing DRC that kind of money. Then again, you hate to see
them risk letting a player with his potential walk away for nothing. Who knows
whether anybody can get him to play at a high level all of the time, but it seems a waste to take the tag option off the table.

Judging from
last year’s free-agent market though, somebody might be willing to make an
offer to Rodgers-Cromartie in the $10 million-per-year range. You could make the case that for one more season at least, it should be the Eagles.

Jon Dorenbos, King Dunlap, Akeem Jordan, Derek Landri, Jake
Scott, and Darryl Tapp make up the rest of the Eagles’ free-agent class.

>> Source: Eagles won't use franchise tag on Rodgers-Cromartie [CSN]

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Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Trout had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”