The Ten Worst Philly Sports Losses of 2011

The Ten Worst Philly Sports Losses of 2011

Hate to say it, but it's pretty undeniable—2011 was way more about the crushing losses than the inspiring wins. Disappointing regular-season performances, heartbreaking playoff no-shows, sweeps and shutouts and all that bad stuff, adding up to making '11 way more "Rolling in the Deep" than "Party Rock Anthem" for Philly pro sports fan. Still, as any native of the City of Brotherly Love will tell you, the losing is just as much a part of the true culture here than the winning, and probably more so, so it never hurts (well, of course it hurts, but yeah) to get back to our roots every so often. Here were the ten losses of 2011 that most reminded us what it really feels like to be a Philly sports fan.

[see our 25 Best Wins of 2011 post here]

Blurbs written by various members of the Level staff...

10. Temple Loses to SDSU in the Second Round of the NCAAs, Mar. 19

All things considered, this wasn't a "bad loss" as much as it just stung like all hell. Temple, without two key starters in Scootie Randall and Michael Eric (the same two guys they're missing right now, by the way), had advanced from the first (now second) round for the first time in their last four attempts and was looking to push Fran Dunphy into weekend number two of the tournament for the first time in his coaching career. Taking a two-seed like San Diego State to double-overtime with a depleted roster felt in some ways like a moral victory, but as guard Khalif Wyatt so often reminds his Temple teammates and their supporters, "There are no moral victories."

9. Union Lose 1-0 to Dynamo in First-Ever Playoff Game, Nov. 3

It was impressive to even be in the MLS postseason in their second year, but their showing left a lot to be desired. The most frustrating part of the game was the curious lineup Peter Nowak put out there—down a goal heading into the second leg, Nowak partnered Danny Mwanga and Jack McInereny, the first time they were ever paired in a starting role. We still can't wait for March, but in that game we saw that more improvements would be necessary for this to become an elite team. Losing in the playoffs is a Philly tradition we'd like to avoid with this club if possible.

8. Eagles' Come-From-Ahead Loss Against the 49ers, Oct. 2

When the Eagles needed a win most after an unexpected 1-2 start, the Niners appeared to be just what the doctor ordered. Philadelphia had jumped out to a 23-3 lead by the third quarter, even despite Ronnie Brown's season-defining backward pass on the goal line, but the defense began to cave in the second half. Suddenly San Francisco was moving the football up and down the field, while rookie kicker Alex Henery missed a pair of makeable field goals that would have put the game out of reach. The final kick in the teeth came on the Eagles' last chance, when a hustling Justin Smith chased down Jeremy Maclin from behind and punched the ball free to secure a 24-23 victory. The Birds didn't get back on track until it was far too late, while the surprising 49ers went on to clinch a postseason bye.

7. Sixers Lose to Pistons to Clinch .500 Season, Apr. 13

After this game, the Sixers went on to lose four of five games to the Miami Heat in the first round of the playoffs—but none of those losses hurt as bad as this. The 41-40 Sixers faced the roster-depleted 30-51 Pistons at home in their last chance to clinch a winning record for the season (their first in over a half-decade), giving us some concrete evidence (however minimal) that this Sixers squad was different than the one-and-done wonders of '07 and '08. But Rodney Stuckey carved them up (29 points on 9-15), and despite stellar offensive performances from Jrue Holiday (21 and 7) and Evan Turner (18-7-6), it came down to a Jason Kapono three in the corner for the game, and like every single other big shot he ever took for the Sixers, he missed. Same old 41-41 Sixers.

6. Penn State Loses to Nebraska After Sandusky Scandal, Nov. 12

If we're being honest, the Nittany Lions' loss to Nebraska was not, in and of itself, the issue. The team was expected to struggle down the stretch—with their last three games as their three toughest tests—so their loss to a talented Nebraska opponent wasn't altogether shocking. What was shocking was the events of the week leading up to the game, which, frankly, are still too fresh for us to feel the need revisit here in any detail. But from the allegations to the student rioting to ultimate dismissal coach Joe Paterno, the Saturday afternoon loss on Penn State's Senior Day was an unfortunate end to the university's most unfortunate week.

5. Flyers Swept By Bruins, May 6

One year after the amazing comeback of winning a series after being down 3-0 in a playoff series, the Flyers were once again down 3-0, but went out with a 5-1 debacle to cap one of the most disappointing seasons in Flyers history. Losses of 7-3, 3-2, 5-1, and 5-1 ended the Richards & Carter era with a whimper. Tim Thomas was the glowing example of what the Flyers hadn't had in decades—a goalie who could carry a team to a Cup. The Flyers, meanwhile, couldn't even decide who should start throughout the playoffs. Even more painful, there were rumors that the Flyers and Bruins had a deal on the table that would have made Thomas a Flyer the previous year, in exchange for the now expendable Carter. This series as much as anything likely led to the dismantling of the team and a big-money, long-years contract offered to a goalie they hoped could be the one.

4. Eagles Unforgivable Loss to Arizona, Nov. 13

By the time the Cardinals came to town, the Eagles already needed plenty of help if they were going to make the playoffs -- but that's what the Cardinals were for, wasn't it? With Arizona relying on backup quarterback John Skelton, the game was supposed to be a breeze. In the end, the Birds came down with a case of the Larry Fitzgeralds. At one point, the All Pro wide receiver snared three deflected passes on the same drive, including a touchdown reception. Meanwhile, Mike Vick suffered some broken ribs on the opening drive, and with this knowledge, for some ungodly reason Andy Reid shied away from the run as LeSean McCoy averaged nearly six yards per carry. In the end, Juan Castillo's defense blew their fifth fourth-quarter lead on the season, effectively pissing away the club's final playoff hopes with a 21-17 loss.

It also spurred the famous Angry Greg Ryan rant. So.

3. Phillies' Game Two vs. Cardinals, Oct. 2

Cliff Lee with a four-run lead? Yeah, we'll take our chances, thanks. No one would admit it, but most of the Philly Phaithful in attendance and watching at home had to be chalking up Game Two as an almost-certain win after the Phils scored four runs in the first two innings, with one of the best post-season pitchers of the 21st century taking the hill for our side. But the $120 million man faltered, letting up three runs in the fourth inning, the tying in the sixth and the go-ahead in the seventh on an Allen Craig single—a lead the Cardinals would hold, knotting the series at 1-1. As the series headed back to St. Louis, the creeping doubt was undeniable—if we couldn't hold that kind of lead with Cliff Lee on the mound, then this series certainly packed the potential for true disaster.

2. Eagles Lose Wild Card Game to Packers, Jan. 9

As absolutely incredible as Michael Vick's first full season as the Eagles' QB1 was, the momentum had certainly started to sputter by the time of the post-season—as a certain Tuesday night game in Minnesota made abundantly clear—and going into their Wild Card matchup against the 10-6, injured-but-finally-getting-healthy Green Bay Packers, nobody could feel all too confident that we were the better team. The early results on the field were not promising—Vick was mostly contained, LeSean McCoy was all but bottled up, and surefooted David Akers missed two makeable field goals. Still, the Eagles were driving in the fourth quarter with a chance to win it, until Vick threw a jump ball in the end zone that was cleanly picked off by Tramon Williams. The Packers went on to win the Super Bowl, the Eagles put their pride before the fall in the 2011 regular season, and, of course, Akers broke just about every regular-season record for a kicker in his first year with the 49ers.

1. Phillies Get Shut Out in Game Five vs. Cardinals, Oct. 7

The hardest part about losing this series-decider to the Cardinals—well, one of the hardest parts—was watching all the idiot pundits on ESPN and SI and whatnot have the temerity afterwards to refer to this game as a "classic." A classic?? Didn't they realize that the Phillies scored zero runs in this game?? Didn't they realize that we totally wasted an all-time studly performance by Roy Halladay because our once-mighty offense couldn't manage more than three hits in nine innings against Chris Carpenter? Didn't they realize that we wouldn't even have been playing this game if we could have held that four-run lead with Cliff Lee in Game Two, or if Roy Oswalt hadn't let David Freese tee off on him in Game Four? Didn't they realize that this might bring about the death of the Era of Good Times at Citizens Bank Park?? Didn't they realize that the world was coming to an end because we couldn't score one f'ing run against this f'ing team that only got to October at all because we swept their closest competitor at home in three meaningless games just because WE WERE THAT F'ING GOOD????

Yeah, this game was a classic all right. Put it on an MLB Network marathon block with Game Six of the '93 World Series, Game Three of the '77 NLCS, and all ten games of the '64 Philly Phold. We've got our popcorn microwaved already.

57 early-entry candidates withdraw from 2016 NBA draft

052416_ev_on_late_round_web2bestvideo3_1920x1080_692121667559.jpg

57 early-entry candidates withdraw from 2016 NBA draft

NBA prospects have been testing the waters and putting out feelers to the gauge interest levels of organizations during the pre-draft process. As a result, 57 early entry-candidates have withdrawn from 2016 draft eligibility. 

Among those are Villanova’s Josh Hart, who worked out for the Sixers and made his decision close to the deadline (see story), and Kris Jenkins. Clemson’s Jaron Blossomgame also worked out for the Sixers and will return for his senior year. 

Below is a complete list of entry entry candidates that have withdrawn:

Abdul-Malik Abu, North Carolina State 
BeeJay Anya, North Carolina State 
Ian Baker, New Mexico State 
V.J. Beachem, Notre Dame 
James Blackmon Jr., Indiana 
Antonio Blakeney, LSU 
Jaron Blossomgame, Clemson 
Trevon Bluiett, Xavier 
Amida Brimah, Connecticut 
Isaiah Briscoe, Kentucky 
Dillon Brooks, Oregon 
Elijah Brown, New Mexico 
Deonte Burton, Iowa State 
Antonio Campbell, Ohio 
Conor Clifford, Washington State 
Charles Cooke III, Dayton 
Bakari Copeland, Maryland-Eastern Shore 
Moustapha Diagne, Northwest Florida State 
Tyler Dorsey, Oregon 
D’Andre Downey, Stillman College (AL) 
Vince Edwards, Purdue 
Jimmy Hall, Kent State 
Josh Hart, Villanova
Josh Hawkinson, Washington State 
Nigel Hayes, Wisconsin 
Ike Iroegbu, Washington State 
Justin Jackson, North Carolina 
Kris Jenkins, Villanova 
Que Johnson, Washington State 
Peter Jok, Iowa 
Moses Kingsley, Arkansas
Travion Kirkendoll, Centenary College (LA) 
Dedric Lawson, Memphis 
Marcus Lee, Kentucky 
Makai Mason, Yale 
Jahmal McMurray, South Florida 
Kennedy Meeks, North Carolina 
Dallas Moore, North Florida 
Jalen Moore, Utah State 
Tyrell Nelson, Gardner-Webb 
Malik Newman, Mississippi State 
Marc-Eddy Norelia, Florida Gulf Coast 
Cameron Oliver, Nevada 
Alec Peters, Valparaiso 
QJ Peterson,VMI 
Malik Pope, San Diego State 
Rodney Purvis, Connecticut 
Corey Sanders Jr., Rutgers 
Caleb Swanigan, Purdue 
Rakish Taylor, Anderson University (SC) 
Ethan Telfair, Idaho State 
Trevor Thompson, Ohio State 
Melo Trimble, Maryland 
Maurice Watson Jr., Creighton 
Andrew White III, Nebraska 
Alec Wintering, Portland 
Zeek Woodley, Northwestern State 

Jim Schwartz's defense path was molded, in part, by Jevon Kearse

052416-snc-schwartz-web1bestvideo3_1920x1080_692281923860.jpg

Jim Schwartz's defense path was molded, in part, by Jevon Kearse

Jim Schwartz is famous for his use of the wide-9 alignment and the 4-3 defense in general. That's the scheme he's had success with in the NFL. That's what he brings to the Eagles.

Yet somewhere in an alternate universe, Schwartz is coaching a 3-4 defense right now, all because the Tennessee Titans never drafted Jevon Kearse.

OK, that might be a stretch considering Schwartz learned under coaches such as Marvin Jones and Gregg Williams, who are also known for the 4-3. Then again, the Eagles' defensive coordinator revealed when he was hired by the Titans as an assistant in 1999, the defense was actually using quite a bit of 3-4. Kearse changed everything, and is in part responsible for Schwartz's preference in scheme to this day.

"When I first went to Tennessee, we based out of a lot of 3-4, but it probably came from just the personnel we had," Schwartz recalled.

"We drafted Jevon Kearse. There was a line of thought that Jevon Kearse was gonna be a 3-4 outside linebacker or he was gonna be a defensive end. We decided to try to make it as simple as we could for him, put him at one spot and just let him attack and rush the passer and let him play the edge.

"We had some success with that, then found other guys in the scheme that fit."

Some success is putting it mildly.

Eagles fans might best remember Kearse for four injury-prone seasons between 2004-07 when he failed to live up to a massive free-agent contract, totaling just 22 sacks. As a first-round pick in 1999, however, "The Freak" burst on to the scene with 14½ sacks, earning Defensive Rookie and Player of the Year honors en route to the first of three consecutive invitations to the Pro Bowl. Kearse had accumulated 47½ sacks after five seasons in Tennessee.

Kearse's final trip to the Pro Bowl came under Schwartz, who ascended to defensive coordinator in 2001, a post he held until being named head coach of the Detroit Lions in '09. Afterward, he served one year as defensive coordinator for the Bills. In 14 NFL seasons, Schwartz has coached eight different linemen to double-digit sack seasons.

Some of that production is the result of a system that allows linemen like Kearse to play fast and attack.

"Philosophically, the thing that's guiding that has been try to make it as simple as we can," Schwartz said.

"It's a coach's job to make a complex scheme simple for the players. It's our job to make it so that they can digest it. There's a lot of things that are going on, on the field — offensive tempo, different personnel groups and formations — there's a million different things going on and they have to process all that stuff. Our job is to streamline the information and allow them to play fast, give them confidence."

Through his experiences, Schwartz has come to believe the 4-3 defense — when equipped with the right personnel up front — is the best method to attack offenses in today's NFL.

"I think that the other part of the 4-3 is when you can affect the passer with four guys, you're not forced to blitz to get pressure on the quarterback, you're in a very good position," he said. "I've been there before when you can't get pressure and you have to blitz — it's not a great feeling. You want to blitz on your terms. You want to be able to blitz when you want to, when the situation is right, not, 'We can't get any pass rush unless we do it.'

"So allowing those guys to keep it simple, to be able to pressure with four and not make yourself skinnier so to speak in coverage can also take some big plays away from offenses."

It's difficult to argue with the results. Schwartz has three previous stints as either a defensive coordinator or head coach in the NFL, during which his units have four top-10 finishes in yards allowed as well as a pair of top-five rankings in points surrendered. Perhaps most impressive of all are the three occasions in which Schwartz's defense finished third the league in takeaways.

Schwartz inherits plenty of talent on the Eagles' defense, particularly along the defensive line. Connor Barwin has twice attained doubled-digit sacks in a season, while Fletcher Cox and Vinny Curry have both eclipsed nine. Brandon Graham and Marcus Smith are former first-round picks, too.

Don't expect this defense to look identical to what Schwartz has done at previous stops, though. While he may be known for a particular approach or brand of football, Schwartz plans to tailor the Eagles' defense to the personnel he has, just like the Titans did with Kearse in Tennessee all those years ago.

"Every year will be a little bit different," Schwartz said. "Our terminology is a little bit different, cast of characters is a little different, and if we're on the right track, we'll put the players in the best position to best use their talents.

"What we did in Buffalo was a little different than what we did in Detroit, which was a little different from what we did in Tennessee, but it's all designed to try to make the most of what you have."

Phillie Phodder: The Ryan Howard drama, trade chips and bat flips

joseph-slide.jpg

Phillie Phodder: The Ryan Howard drama, trade chips and bat flips

CHICAGO — The Phillies are here for what figures to be the toughest test thus far in their surprising break from the starting gate — three games against the Chicago Cubs, a team built to win the World Series and so far looking as if it can do just that. The Cubs were the first team to reach 30 wins this season, are 14-6 at home, and averaging a National League-best 5.69 runs per game, over two more than the 3.3 runs the Phillies are putting on the board per contest.

The series will be interesting even beyond the test the Phillies will receive because we could see another progression in the raging Ryan Howard drama.

In Tommy Joseph, the Phillies have a player worthy of taking away playing time from the struggling Howard. Joseph started at first base the last three games in Detroit, hit in the middle of the lineup and did so with authority. Phillies management is on record as saying it needs an injection of offense to support the good pitching the team has gotten. If it is committed to that idea, then Joseph needs to keep playing. He will start Friday afternoon against lefty Jon Lester. He should start again on Saturday and Sunday when the Phillies face right-handed pitchers.

Will he?

The guess here is that Joseph starts one of the weekend games with Howard getting the other. That right there would be a continuation of the phasing out of Howard from the lineup. If Joseph delivers against right-handed pitching, the Phillies owe it to their fans and the players who have put together this quick and entertaining start to keep playing him.

But this whole drama remains a sticky situation on a lot of levels. Howard is not walking away from the more than $25 million that remains on his contract and he shouldn’t. But there’s no way he’s going to be happy sitting on the bench and it’s difficult to envision him contributing as a reserve player/bat off the bench. He has a tough enough time making contact while getting regular at-bats. How’s he going to hold up as a reserve?

Poorly.

If Joseph continues to emerge, the Phillies will have to consider releasing Howard. Either that or they ride out the final four months of his contract with him sitting on the bench. Neither solution is comfortable. As one of the franchise’s greatest players and a champion, Howard is going to end up on the team’s Wall of Fame someday and it would be nice if he showed up at the induction. Would a release sour his relationship with the organization forever? It’s a factor that the Phillies can consider because they are still in a rebuild and, as well as they’ve played so far, it’s tough to see them staying in contention for the long haul. If this team was projected to win, then it’s a different story. If there was ever a year to suck it up and let Howard leave with dignity, it’s this one. But if carrying Howard as a reserve leads to a cumbersome situation in a young clubhouse, maybe parting is the best solution.

Regardless of the endgame, Joseph needs to keep getting regular at-bats because the baseball still matters.

                                                                      ***

While Odubel Herrera’s three-run home run and subsequent bat flip dominated Wednesday’s win over Detroit, several other players made contributions. Andres Blanco, with his typical booster shot of energy, plus two hits, an RBI, two runs scored and the team’s first steal of home since 2009, was one of them. Jeanmar Gomez, who only out of Pete Mackanin’s desperation got a shot at closer in early April, was another with his 17th save.

If the Phillies’ lack of offense catches up with them and they fall out of the race, Blanco and Gomez could be trade chips for the team. Blanco’s ability to come off the bench and contribute on both sides of the ball could be attractive to a team that is ready to win in October. He won’t bring back a game-breaking talent, but it would be worth taking a chance on a young minor-league arm, a lottery ticket, that could ultimately develop into something.

Gomez’s big season has the feel of lightning in a bottle. He’s done a terrific job getting saves without typical closer’s stuff. He relies on touch, feel, location and pitching savvy. He makes hitters get themselves out. How long can it last? Who knows? But Gomez deserves kudos and very well could ride his unexpected success to a spot in the All-Star Game. Shortly after that, if the Phillies are out of the race, the front office should look to cash in on his unforeseen value, which will never be higher, and deal him to one of the many teams that will be looking for bullpen help. Gomez could help a contender in the seventh, eighth or ninth inning and if he keeps pitching well, might bring back a decent return.

Jeremy Hellickson and Carlos Ruiz could also be trade chips in July — if the Phils fall out of the race. We talked about that recently with Ruiz.

If the Phils stay in the race, the front office would probably have to hang on to at least several of these players. Trading players, even role players, could send a bad message to fans if the team still has a chance at the postseason. The exception would be Hellickson. It could make sense to deal him either way and use his departure as an opportunity to bring up the next young arm from the minors. Hellickson has pitched well lately and it would benefit the team in more ways that one if he continued to do so.

Switching over to the glass-half-full side … there is a chance the Phillies will pursue a bat to boost their anemic offense, but the decision to even make that move is still a ways away. Matt Klentak made it pretty clear that he needs to see more from this club over the next month or so before he goes after a bat in a trade. And Klentak is not about to compromise the rebuild to add a bat for short-term contribution. In other words, he’s not about to trade away prospects for outfield bats that might get in the way of Nick Williams, Roman Quinn or Dylan Cozens rising to the majors in the next year. The Phillies do have money. If an opposing team wants to move an expiring contract — someone like a Jay Bruce — and it would cost the Phillies more on the money side than the prospect side, that could be a fit for the Phillies.

If they stay in the race.

                                                                      ***

Getting to Herrera’s bat flip … it was fun. And this scribe believes the kid when he says it was natural. But there’s risk involved in something like that. Herrera is a kid that loves to play the game and loves to be on the field. But he needs to beware that if he flips his bat on the wrong guy, he’s going to end up with a broken batting helmet or a broken rib. You can talk about new-school ways and making the game fun again — as if it ever stopped being fun — but pitchers are competitors and they don’t like being shown up, be it intentional or not. They didn’t in the old school and they don’t in the new school. This scribe loves players who play with emotion, energy and exuberance, and there’s nothing wrong with celebrating your successes. Heck, Babe Ruth used to tip his hat rounding the bases. But there is a limit. Herrera is the Phillies’ best player and he has a responsibility to stay on the field. He might want to think twice before he goes with a “big air” bat flip on his next home run because if he does it on the wrong pitcher, he might get hurt.