The time 'genius' head coach Chip Kelly deferred to Cary Williams

The time 'genius' head coach Chip Kelly deferred to Cary Williams

Want to know what makes Chip Kelly smarter than a lot of other bosses around the NFL? He knows he doesn’t always have all the answers and is willing to take good advice—even when it comes from a player.

The Philadelphia Eagles’ offense was stranded in a ditch somewhere off of I-95 until cornerback Cary Williams offered a few suggestions. Once Williams told Kelly which routes the Lions wide receivers were running were giving him the most trouble in the snowy conditions at Lincoln Financial Field, the Birds’ fortunes changed.

The Eagles converted just one first down on their opening five possessions. They were scoreless at halftime. Foles looked completely ineffective, connecting on just four of 13 passes for 35 yards and throwing his first interception of the season. The team had just fallen behind 14-0 with 6:37 remaining in the third quarter.

Next thing you know, Foles hit a few big passes, and Philly was back. A 12-yard rope to DeSean Jackson on 3rd-and-11. A 44-yard bomb over the top of the Detroit secondary to Riley Cooper. And finally, a 19-yard prayer to Jackson in the back of the end zone to complete the sequence.

Chip was asked about Foles’ turnaround sparking the offense, and the 44-yard pass to Cooper in particular. He was happy to explain, as transcribed by PhiladelphiaEagles.com:

It was a big play, a real tough catch. That was almost a little bit of confidence that we can get some throws off. We felt like with our receivers felt ‑‑ it was funny, Cary Williams was the one who came up to me, and he was like, ‘Coach, this is what you've got to do because you can't make up speed if the guy makes a stick move on you just because of the footing.’ And Cary was kind of the one, and it's coming from a defensive guy saying, hey, if you have an opportunity to either throw a post or throw a corner route, it's hard to make up. Finally we hit Riley on it, it was almost like that kind of got us going, got our confidence back a little bit, and then we got rolling there.

Williams expressed a ton of approval and support for Chip as well after the game.

"You raise the ground up six, seven, eight inches maybe. It was difficult to turn and get your movements. And then on top of that, if you did turn, it was hard to get that foot in the ground, so you were sliding."

"I just kinda told Coach, 'Hey man, let's go with the post and fades even, because guys can't turn and run in these particular conditions. The field is elevated in some areas. And then you get the ice up under you in your cleats. You step and you may slip. Some of the things that I was going through -- I relayed the message to him and tried to take advantage of the situation.

"It was great that a head coach had confidence in a guy that has nothing to do with offense."

Granted, some of their problems early were completely weather related. Whatever Williams told Kelly, it obviously worked. Foles had only connected on four of his initial 13 passes for 35 yards before that drive, throwing his first interception of the season in the process. From that drive on however, Foles was 7-of-9 for 144 and a touchdown.

Foles also ran one in, and would’ve tossed another had Brent Celek not selflessly slid short of the goal line so the Eagles could kneel out the final seconds.

Give Cary Williams credit for being able to provide Chip Kelly a player’s perspective on the impact of the conditions, but good on Kelly for having the common sense to listen and apply that knowledge. It seems so obvious, yet when it came to previous regimes, obvious often seemed to fly out the window for the Eagles when it came to gameday decisions.

>> Who helped spark Eagles' offense? Cary Williams [CSN]

You can play with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons in NBA Jam

You can play with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons in NBA Jam

He’s on fire.

Ever wonder what it would be like to play NBA Jam with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons? Well now you can.

Thanks to a roster update, spotted by Kotaku, you can now have the fun of matching up Embiid with Simmons, or Embiid with Nerlens Noel or even the more daring combination of Jahlil Okafor with Noel.

Here’s what the player ratings look like for all of the aforementioned players in this reboot of one of the more popular games in the early-90s.

In addition to current NBA rosters, the game also gives you the ability to play with Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Kanye West, and yes, even Harambe.

So fire up your computer and match up your favorite two Sixers, or politicians.

Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez elected to baseball's Hall of Fame

Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez elected to baseball's Hall of Fame

NEW YORK -- Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez were elected to baseball's Hall of Fame on Wednesday, earning the honor as Trevor Hoffman and Vladimir Guerrero fell just short.

Steroids-tainted stars Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens were passed over for the fifth straight year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America. But they received a majority of votes for the first time and could be in position to gain election in coming years.

Bagwell , on the ballot for the seventh time after falling 15 votes short last year, received 381 of 442 votes for 86.2 percent. Players needed 75 percent, which came to 332 votes this year.

"Anxiety was very, very high," Bagwell said. "I wrote it on a ball tonight. It was kind of cool."

In his 10th and final year of eligibility, Raines was on 380 ballots (86 percent). Rodriguez received 336 votes (76 percent) to join Johnny Bench in 1989 as the only catchers elected on the first ballot.

Hoffman was five votes shy and Guerrero 15 short.

Edgar Martinez was next at 58.6 percent, followed by Clemens at 54.1 percent, Bonds at 53.8 percent, Mike Mussina at 51.8 percent, Curt Schilling at 45 percent, Lee Smith at 34.2 percent and Manny Ramirez at 23.8 percent.

Players will be inducted July 30 during ceremonies at Cooperstown along with former Commissioner Bud Selig and retired Kansas City and Atlanta executive John Schuerholz, both elected last month by a veterans committee.

Bagwell was a four-time All-Star who spent his entire career with Houston, finishing with a .297 batting average, 401 homers and 1,401 RBIs.

Raines, fifth in career stolen bases, was a seven-time All-Star and the 1986 NL batting champion. He spent 13 of 23 big league seasons with the Montreal Expos, who left Canada to become the Washington Nationals for the 2005 season, and joins Andre Dawson and Gary Carter as the only players to enter the Hall representing the Expos.

Raines hit .294 with a .385 on-base percentage, playing during a time when Rickey Henderson was the sport's dominant speedster.

Rodriguez, a 14-time All-Star who hit .296 with 311 homers and 1,332 RBIs, was never disciplined for PEDs but former Texas teammate Jose Canseco alleged in a 2005 book that he injected the catcher with steroids. Asked whether he was on the list of players who allegedly tested positive for steroids during baseball's 2003 survey, Rodriguez said in 2009: "Only God knows."

Bonds, a seven-time MVP who holds the season and career home run records, received 36.2 percent in his initial appearance, in 2013, and jumped from 44.3 percent last year. Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, rose from 45.2 percent last year.

Bonds was indicted on charges he lied to a grand jury in 2003 when he denied using PEDs, but a jury failed to reach a verdict on three counts he made false statements and convicted him on one obstruction of justice count, finding he gave an evasive answer. The conviction was overturned appeal in 2015.

Clemens was acquitted on one count of obstruction of Congress, three counts of making false statements to Congress and two counts of perjury, all stemming from his denials of drug use.

A 12-time All-Star on the ballot for the first time, Ramirez was twice suspended for violating baseball's drug agreement. He helped the Boston Red Sox win World Series titles in 2004 and `07, the first for the franchise since 1918, and hit .312 with 555 home runs and 1,831 RBIs in 19 big league seasons.

Several notable players will join them in the competition for votes in upcoming years: Chipper Jones and Jim Thome in 2018, Mariano Rivera and Roy Halladay in 2019, and Derek Jeter in 2020.

Lee Smith, who had 478 saves, got 34 percent in his final time on the ballot. Jorge Posada, Tim Wakefield and Magglio Ordonez were among the players who got under 5 percent and fell off future ballots.