Where Did Andy Reids Assistants Wind Up?

Where Did Andy Reids Assistants Wind Up?

While we await the Eagles’ formal introduction of Chip
Kelly’s new coaching staff, in particular the naming of a defensive
coordinator, many of the assistants who served Philadelphia under Andy Reid are
already finding work. Marty Mornhinweg, Todd Bowles, and Bobby April have all
managed to land on their feet since the band broke up.

In fact, Juan Castillo will even be on the sidelines for the
Baltimore Ravens at Super Bowl XLVII less than two weeks from today.

John Harbaugh, a colleague of Castillo’s for many years with
the Eagles, hired the former offensive line coach to be a consultant leading up
to the big game, and he will join the staff in a full-time capacity as the club’s
running game coordinator once the season ends. We’re not exactly sure what a
running game coordinator is, but Castillo turned down other offers – including Reid
– to take the job in Baltimore.

It’s good to see Castillo wind up with a gig, and spurn Andy
in the process, after the impossible situation he was put in during his last
two years with the Birds. While he’s taken a step or two down the ladder in the
process, he still appears to be a better situation than several of the other
departed coaches.

Todd Bowles

Bowles landed quite possibly the cushiest job of the bunch
having been named defensive coordinator of the Arizona Cardinals, the
12th-ranked unit in the NFL this season. Apparently running Philly’s defense
into the ground after taking over at coordinator for Castillo after six games
didn’t hurt his stock too much – although to be fair to Bowles, something was
obviously amiss behind the scenes.

Marty Mornhingweg

Marty was named offensive coordinator of the New York Jets,
where he’ll have his work cut out for him. Assuming the organization doesn’t
move on from Mark Sanchez, who has guarantees built into his contract,
Mornhinweg is tasked with restoring a quarterback that has a career 71.6 passer
rating over four seasons. There are also rumors it’s a potential destination
for Michael Vick, so good luck with all of that.

Bobby April

Hailed as a special teams guru upon his arrival, the Eagles’
third unit never looked very strong under April at any point during his
three-year tenure. Now he packs up his act and heads to the Oakland Raiders, a
team whose two best players are often special teamers – the punter and place
kicker.

Jim Washburn

Lucky for Wash, the Detroit Lions still want to utilize the
wide-9, and his son happens to be on the staff there. Nothing beats a little
nepotism! Word is the disgraced defensive line coach will join the team as an
assistant, though he is not there to replace anybody on the current staff, so
he should at least have a vast reduction of power.

Howard Mudd

The long-time offensive line coach has presumably gone back
into retirement after Reid lured him away two years ago, so we’ve probably seen
the last of him.

Doug Pederson

After playing under Reid in Green Bay and Philly, Pederson
joined the Eagles’ staff in 2009, spending the past couple seasons as
quarterbacks coach. He followed Andy to Kansas City, where he becomes the
offensive coordinator. That’s a big step up for Pederson, although Reid will
reportedly call the plays for the Chiefs.

Duce Staley

As you can see, the Eagles mostly allowed their coaches to
depart whether they were under contract or not, but there was one notable
exception. Reid wanted to take coaching intern and former Bird Staley to KC,
but the front office blocked the move, and now Duce is expected to stay on as
running backs coach. They must really like something they see, enough to
replace Ted Williams, who had been the running backs coach since ’97. Williams will switch to tight ends coach to accommodate (h/t KonfusedKendrick).

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You can play with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons in NBA Jam

You can play with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons in NBA Jam

He’s on fire.

Ever wonder what it would be like to play NBA Jam with Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons? Well now you can.

Thanks to a roster update, spotted by Kotaku, you can now have the fun of matching up Embiid with Simmons, or Embiid with Nerlens Noel or even the more daring combination of Jahlil Okafor with Noel.

Here’s what the player ratings look like for all of the aforementioned players in this reboot of one of the more popular games in the early-90s.

In addition to current NBA rosters, the game also gives you the ability to play with Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Kanye West, and yes, even Harambe.

So fire up your computer and match up your favorite two Sixers, or politicians.

Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez elected to baseball's Hall of Fame

Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Ivan Rodriguez elected to baseball's Hall of Fame

NEW YORK -- Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez were elected to baseball's Hall of Fame on Wednesday, earning the honor as Trevor Hoffman and Vladimir Guerrero fell just short.

Steroids-tainted stars Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens were passed over for the fifth straight year by the Baseball Writers' Association of America. But they received a majority of votes for the first time and could be in position to gain election in coming years.

Bagwell , on the ballot for the seventh time after falling 15 votes short last year, received 381 of 442 votes for 86.2 percent. Players needed 75 percent, which came to 332 votes this year.

"Anxiety was very, very high," Bagwell said. "I wrote it on a ball tonight. It was kind of cool."

In his 10th and final year of eligibility, Raines was on 380 ballots (86 percent). Rodriguez received 336 votes (76 percent) to join Johnny Bench in 1989 as the only catchers elected on the first ballot.

Hoffman was five votes shy and Guerrero 15 short.

Edgar Martinez was next at 58.6 percent, followed by Clemens at 54.1 percent, Bonds at 53.8 percent, Mike Mussina at 51.8 percent, Curt Schilling at 45 percent, Lee Smith at 34.2 percent and Manny Ramirez at 23.8 percent.

Players will be inducted July 30 during ceremonies at Cooperstown along with former Commissioner Bud Selig and retired Kansas City and Atlanta executive John Schuerholz, both elected last month by a veterans committee.

Bagwell was a four-time All-Star who spent his entire career with Houston, finishing with a .297 batting average, 401 homers and 1,401 RBIs.

Raines, fifth in career stolen bases, was a seven-time All-Star and the 1986 NL batting champion. He spent 13 of 23 big league seasons with the Montreal Expos, who left Canada to become the Washington Nationals for the 2005 season, and joins Andre Dawson and Gary Carter as the only players to enter the Hall representing the Expos.

Raines hit .294 with a .385 on-base percentage, playing during a time when Rickey Henderson was the sport's dominant speedster.

Rodriguez, a 14-time All-Star who hit .296 with 311 homers and 1,332 RBIs, was never disciplined for PEDs but former Texas teammate Jose Canseco alleged in a 2005 book that he injected the catcher with steroids. Asked whether he was on the list of players who allegedly tested positive for steroids during baseball's 2003 survey, Rodriguez said in 2009: "Only God knows."

Bonds, a seven-time MVP who holds the season and career home run records, received 36.2 percent in his initial appearance, in 2013, and jumped from 44.3 percent last year. Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, rose from 45.2 percent last year.

Bonds was indicted on charges he lied to a grand jury in 2003 when he denied using PEDs, but a jury failed to reach a verdict on three counts he made false statements and convicted him on one obstruction of justice count, finding he gave an evasive answer. The conviction was overturned appeal in 2015.

Clemens was acquitted on one count of obstruction of Congress, three counts of making false statements to Congress and two counts of perjury, all stemming from his denials of drug use.

A 12-time All-Star on the ballot for the first time, Ramirez was twice suspended for violating baseball's drug agreement. He helped the Boston Red Sox win World Series titles in 2004 and `07, the first for the franchise since 1918, and hit .312 with 555 home runs and 1,831 RBIs in 19 big league seasons.

Several notable players will join them in the competition for votes in upcoming years: Chipper Jones and Jim Thome in 2018, Mariano Rivera and Roy Halladay in 2019, and Derek Jeter in 2020.

Lee Smith, who had 478 saves, got 34 percent in his final time on the ballot. Jorge Posada, Tim Wakefield and Magglio Ordonez were among the players who got under 5 percent and fell off future ballots.