Why Eagles Fans Should Root for the Patriots, and (Almost) Enjoy It

Why Eagles Fans Should Root for the Patriots, and (Almost) Enjoy It

Most of us are naturally inclined to root against the Giants. Just look
at what's on the line. Not only are the Birds' division rivals in the
NFC East, there's also the interstate rivalry with New Yorkers. As the
Cowboys have floundered for much of the past decade, the Giants have
replaced them as the Eagles' chief antagonists. Cheering for the Giants
is akin to pulling for the villain's plot to succeed in a Batman
flick.

However, some fans find themselves in a
troubling position as Super Bowl XLVI approaches, because the New
England Patriots are not exactly a likeable bunch of characters either.
They have a bit of a dynasty going on up there, the road for which was
paved -- in some minds -- by cheating. They dashed Philadelphia's title
dreams in Super Bowl XXXIX, the face of the franchise is married to a
supermodel, and the city of Boston has been exceptionally fortunate in
this millennium, winning championships in all four major sports within
the past seven years.

How do we root for that?

Thing
is, that's a whole other conference. The Eagles can't control what
happens in the AFC, so a Patriots victory, while insufferable for a few
days, will fade. However, the Birds could have prevented the Giants from
reaching this point, and should they win on Sunday, you will hear about
it -- from their fans, from our fans, from the media. It's going to be
everywhere, all offseason, all summer, during next season's tilts...
forever.

Okay, so the overwhelming majority of you
have already chosen not to align with the enemy, but you're
understandably still on the fence about New England. Truth is, they
aren't so bad once you get to know them. Really. In case watching a
rival go down in flames isn't quite motivation enough, here are a few
reasons you might get a modicum of enjoyment out of a Patriots
victory.

Former Eagles on the roster
If you're
looking for a sentimental angle, a pair of former Birds will be in
uniform for the Patriots: journeyman special teams ace Tracy White, and
one-time training camp darling Kyle Arrington.

White
was with Philadelphia for the 2008-09 seasons until he was traded to New
England for an undisclosed draft pick in 2012, which as it turns out
will be a sixth-round pick. Not bad. After attending Eagles' training
camp in Lehigh, Arrington spent 2008 on Tampa Bay's practice squad, and
played in the club's opener the following season before being released.
He wound up with the Pats, and has started in 31 games (including
playoffs) over the past two years. He tied for the league lead in
interceptions this season with seven.

Sure, those
two guys are a thin premise for cheering on New England, but perhaps not
when you consider who will be standing on the other sidelines: Stacy
Andrews, one of the most ridiculed free agent signings in Eagles
franchise history. No way you want that bum to get his ring,
right?

The
Patriot Way
It may sound like some cheesy cliche,
similar to Joe Banner referring to the Eagles' organization as the "gold
standard," but Philadelphians would embrace the tenets of the Patriot
Way. It's a true team-first concept up there in a world of me-first
professional athletes.

When Randy Moss started
causing a ruckus in the locker room, the Patriots dealt him to Minnesota
mid-season, despite the fact that Moss had caught 50 touchdown passes
in 52 games with the club. When expensive free agents such as Albert
Haynesworth aren't cutting it, the Patriots admit their mistake in the
most public way possible, clearing that roster spot for somebody who
gets it.

This is an organization that has taken a
permanent sideshow in Chad Ochocinco, and amidst the worst season of his
NFL career, incredibly has him toeing the company
line.

What you get is a roster somewhat lacking in
star power, instead assembled with players who buy in to their system.
Yes, they have Tom Brady, Rob Gronkowski, and Vince Wilfork -- that's
some legitimate greatness right there. They also have 18 undrafted
players, guys like Danny Woodhead and Arrington, carving out key roles.
They make homes for veterans such as Brian Waters and Shaun Ellis who
are maybe past their primes, and several of their best players are
overachieving castoffs who nobody really wanted, for instance Wes Welker
and even Brady.

It's a humble collection of athletes
that place the team's goal above all else. They don't make a lot of
noise in the media, they just go out and win football games. It's hard
not to respect that philosophy, especially in this day and
age.

Belichick is a mad scientist... and it's
fun to watch!
On Sunday, a diminutive kick
returner/wide receiver will fill in at nickel cornerback. An offensive
lineman will line up at tight end on certain run downs. A tight end will
take handoffs out of the backfield -- and these are just the
unconventional formations that we've seen already. Who knows what Bill
Belichick might have in store for the Giants.

No head
coach in the NFL is better at finding unique roles for his players. He
turned Troy Brown from a Pro-Bowl wide receiver into a full-time corner
in the twilight of his career. He allowed linebacker Mike Vrabel to
become a staple of the offense's goal-line package, catching 10
touchdown passes in his career. Long before Andy Reid pegged Dan Klecko
as the Eagles' fullback, the defensive tackle by trade had experimented
at the position in New England.

Heck, Tom Brady could
surprise punt the ball on third down, or the Patriots could attempt to
convert a 4th and 2 on their own 29-yard line. We wouldn't even count on
their running out the clock should things get out of hand -- after all,
they're far more efficient through the air.

Their
brand of football is a breath of fresh air in the copycat world of
professional sports. There's an extra level of intrigue when Julian
Edelman is trying to cover Victor Cruz, when Aaron Hernandez might be
more dangerous at running back than he is at tight end, and when the
idea is in your head that they really might attempt a pass to Nick
Solder, in the Super Bowl of all games.

That is
football, my friends, and Bill Belichick gets
it.

History
It may come as a small
consolation, or none at all, but what the Patriots have managed to
accomplish in the salary cap era may never be duplicated. You
understandably may not like the team or its fans one bit, but it may be
time to consider shifting from disdain to appreciation as the
Belichick-Brady combination head toward their final act. Both men are
among the greatest of all time at their respective jobs, and you
witnessed a run that's felled NFL records, nearly produced the league's
first 19-0 season, and featured a solid number of future Hall of
Famers.

One day, your grandchildren could be asking
if you ever saw Tom Brady coolly slide step in the pocket and deliver a
tight spiral as he operated one of his many game-winning drives, or
stare at you in wonder as you try to explain how a franchise won three
Super Bowls in four years during the age of parity. You'll talk about
the Tuck Rule Game and Spygate, but also Adam Vinatieri hitting three
championship-clinching field goals, and their intense rivalry with
Peyton Manning's Colts, which produced some of the finest contests ever
played on the gridiron.

Again, it may not provide
much comfort right now, but it's got to be better than being on the
wrong side of history. If the Giants should win for the second time in
five seasons, it will solidify the greatness of their head coach Tom
Coughlin, who was eternally on the hot seat during his tenure. It will
build on the legacy of Eli Manning, quite possibly the goofiest elite
quarterback the game has ever seen. It will create a legend out of their
front four, a group that will have once more catapulted New York to the
promised land using the old mantra "better late than
never."

The Patriots winning yet again has got to be
better than being constantly reminded that the Giants would then have
four Super Bowl Championships -- two against the most dominant franchise
of an era -- while Philadelphia has zero. A three-trophy lead is enough
as it is without them adding another.

Simply put,
who wants to live in a world where a division and regional rival has
ultimate bragging rights for a full year? Not I, and I hope not you
either.

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

Sixers' game vs. Kings rescheduled for Jan. 30

The NBA has determined a new date for the Sixers home game against the Kings, which was postponed on Nov. 30 because of unsafe playing conditions on the court.

The game has been rescheduled for Monday, Jan. 30 at 6 p.m. This will create back-to-backs for both teams.

The Sixers are playing in Chicago on Jan. 29. They will play consecutive games against the Bulls and Kings, then have a road back-to-back against the Mavericks and Spurs on Feb. 1 and 2.

The Kings will be on what is now an eight-game road trip. They will play a back-to-back against the Rockets the next night in Houston.

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

ap-wells-fargo-center-flyers.jpg
The Associated Press

Former Flyers coach Bill Dineen dies at 84

Bill Dineen, who had the distinction of being Eric Lindros’ first NHL coach, died early Saturday morning at his home in Lake George, New York. He was 84.
 
“Such a wonderful person, who got along with everybody,” Flyers president Paul Holmgren said. “I never played for him, but worked with him in scouting. Just a great guy.” 
 
Dineen succeeded Holmgren as head coach during the 1991-92 season.
 
“When I got fired, a lot of our guys were squeezing their sticks,” Holmgren said. “They were tight. It shouldn’t be hard to play the game. When things got tough, they were a little under stress, Billy coming in, he loosened things up.”
 
Dineen coached parts of two seasons here from 1991-92 through the 1992-93 season, which was Lindros’ first year as a Flyer.
 
“Bill treated everyone with the utmost respect,” Holmgren said. “He was the perfect guy for Eric coming in here. That respect goes both ways. He was almost a grandfatherly figure for Eric at the time.”

Dineen served as a scout with the organization from 1990-91 until succeeding Holmgren as coach. He then returned to a scouting role in 1993-94 and remained with the Flyers as a scout through 1996-97.
 
Mark Howe, one of the greatest Flyers defensemen of all-time, played for Dineen as an 18-year-old rookie in the WHA with the Houston Aeros (1973-74), and also had him during his final year as a Flyer in 1991-92.
 
“He was one of the best people I ever met in the game of hockey,” Howe said. “He was a real players coach. Of all the guys I ever played for. Maybe a little Paul Holmgren, too. 
 
“If you lost the game, he was one of the very few people if you went for a bite to eat or a beer after the game you lost, you actually felt poorly for letting the coach down.”
 
Howe said Dineen’s teams weren’t all about skill.
 
“He picked people that were about ‘the team,'” Howe said. “He made me earn my spot that first year in Houston.”
 
Dineen posted a 60-60-20 record with the Flyers. His son, Kevin, played on both of those teams before assuming the captaincy from Rick Tocchet in 1993-94. 
 
A gentleman behind the bench, Bill Dineen was much the same person as a player. A former right wing who spent the majority of his six-year playing career with the Detroit Red Wings, he had just 122 penalty minutes in 322 games, scoring 51 goals and 95 points.
 
“I knew Billy for a long time," Flyers senior vice president Bob Clarke said. "He was a player and coach at the minor league level and the NHL level, but I think more importantly he was a really, really good hockey person and really good person.” 

Dineen won two WHA titles coaching the Aeros and two Stanley Cups as a player with the Red Wings. A member of the AHL Hall of Fame, Dineen also coached the Adirondack Red Wings from 1983 through 1988-89.
 
Three of his five sons — Gordon, Peter and Kevin — played in the NHL. Sons Shawn and Jerry had their roots in the AHL. 
 
“His boys are scattered all over the map,” Holmgren said. “Just a tremendous hockey family.”
 
Dineen is part of Flyer folklore trivia. He, along with Keith Allen and Vic Stasiuk, were all Red Wings teammates during 1953-53. They also shared something else in common: all three later  became Flyers head coaches.