Former SJU Hawk Todd O'Brien Rips Phil Martelli in SI Column Updating Feed

Former SJU Hawk Todd O'Brien Rips Phil Martelli in SI Column Updating Feed

This may only be one side of the story, but it's a pretty compelling side.

Former St. Joseph's basketball center Todd O'Brien has written a column in Sports Illustrated accusing the university's athletic department—and head coach Phil Martelli, in particular—of prohibiting his transfer to the University of Alabama-Birmingham without cause.

O'Brien, who is currently enrolled at UAB and taking classes toward the achievement of his Masters Degree, alleges that Martelli is prohibiting him from exercising his remaining year of eligibility out of pure spite. Spite is really the only assumed motivation, because, according to O'Brien, St. Joseph's did not provide an explanation as to why they were declining his request for transfer when they were prompted to do so.

[excerpts from the piece and an official response from St. Joseph's University below]

From O'Brien:

"I met with Coach Martelli to inform him that I would not be returning. I had hoped he would be understanding; just a few weeks before, we had stood next to each other at graduation as my parents snapped photo. Unfortunately, he did not take it well. After calling me a few choice words, he informed me that he would make some calls so that I would be dropped from my summer class and would no longer graduate. He also said that he was going to sue me. When he asked if I still planned on leaving, I was at a loss for words. He calmed down a bit and said we should think this over then meet again in a few days. I left his office angry and worried he would make me drop the classes.

A few days later I again met with Coach Martelli. This time I stopped by athletic director Don DiJulia's office beforehand to inform him of my decision. I told him I would be applying to grad schools elsewhere. He was very nice and understanding. He wished me the best of luck and said to keep in touch. Relieved that Mr. DiJulia had taken the news well, I went to Coach Martelli's office. I told him that my mind had not changed, and that I planned on enrolling in grad school elsewhere. I recall his words vividly: "Regardless of what the rule is I'll never release you. If you're not playing basketball at St. Joe's next year, you won't be playing anywhere."

And from the university:

"Saint Joseph’s University followed all applicable NCAA procedures and applied consistent internal practices in declining to support the requested transfer exception. Upon appeal, the NCAA legislative relief waiver team (initial decision) and the Division I Subcommittee for Legislative Relief (final decision) each reviewed the case and did not grant the requested waiver.

Institutional policy and federal student records law prohibit Saint Joseph’s from releasing additional or confidential information in this matter. As all eligibility determinations rest with the NCAA and not its member institutions, Saint Joseph’s University has no further comment and considers the matter closed.”

Head on over to SI.com to read the complete story as told by O'Brien.

As we again stress that O'Brien's narrative is just one side of the story—and told from a young man understandably bitter about being denied a transfer against his wishes—we'll let you be the judge as to who is in the right and wrong after reading his column, and then revisiting the SJU statement in response.

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Update (12/19/11 at 10:15 p.m.): Not mentioned in the SI story was this February 2011 report from Dick Jerardi
which mentions O'Brien as being (what seems to be briefly) suspended
from the basketball team after his "peripheral involvement" in an
incident surrounding a stolen laptop that would ultimately result in
then-freshman Patrick Swilling, Jr. leaving the basketball team. Though
the omission of this information in O'Brien's chain of events is surely
convenient, it doesn't  seem to have any real import on why the
university would take such a hardline approach to his transfer either.

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Update (12/20/11 at 1:21 p.m.): Regardless of how you want to view what happened, both the coach and university are getting pummeled by the national media, and will likely continue to be until the situation is resolved. Martelli has been a plenty divisive figure during his tenure at St. Joseph's, and this story figures only to further the ill-will he has already generated in some quarters. Now even athletic director Dom DiJulia is being taken to task for "hiding" behind the failed appeal of his own decision.

Though St. Joseph's considers the matter "closed," we will be sure to provide updates in the event they become available.

In the meantime, we're going to point you in the direction of the @SethDavisHoops twitter feed. While Seth clearly has his own leanings on the story, he's also done a great job pointing out the absurdity of a student-athlete even needing a release given the rules which govern an institution's ability not to renew scholarships and a coach's ability to leave a program at any time.

This is really just a bad situation all around at the moment, and one that has the feeling that its only going the get worse before it gets better, be it for one or both parties. In that sense, even if they do see themselves as justified in their actions, Martelli, DiJulia and the university might want to rethink their position even if its just to rid themselves of what's quickly becoming a nationally-recognized debacle. Really, it's hard to think of a worse time for this story to come out considering the program is in the middle of a legitimate state of revival. Solely in the interest of having the media refocus on the actual basketball being played, wouldn't they just want to get rid of this and let the kid go?

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Again, more if we get it, come across it, or have it brought to our attention.

>>>My Name is Todd O'Brien and I am Getting Shafted by St. Joe's and the NCAA [SI]

This is an updating thread subject to change as further details emerge.

Today's lineup: Franco batting cleanup as Phillies try to snap skid

Today's lineup: Franco batting cleanup as Phillies try to snap skid

Well, this hasn't gone well. 

Coming into Thursday afternoon's game against the Rockies, the Phillies have lost five straight. They've lost nine of their last 10. They've lost 20 of their last 24. 

At 15-29, they're not just the worst team in the NL East. They're not just the worst team in the National League. 

Through 44 games, the Phillies are the worst team in baseball. 

Just to make it to a .500 record this season, they would need to go 66-52 (.559) the rest of the way. 

Their four-game series against the Rockies will mercifully come to a close on Thursday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park. In the first three games of the series -- all losses -- the Phils have been outscored 23-5. 

Maikel Franco returns to the four-hole as the Phillies try to snap out of their funk. 

Here's the full lineup: 

1. Cesar Hernandez, 2B
2. Aaron Altherr, LF
3. Odubel Herrera, CF
4. Maikel Franco, 3B
5. Tommy Joseph, 1B
6. Michael Saunders, RF
7. Cameron Rupp, C
8. Freddy Galvis, SS
9. Vince Velasquez, P

With new mindset, Nelson Agholor embraces competition to prove himself to Eagles

With new mindset, Nelson Agholor embraces competition to prove himself to Eagles

Nelson Agholor’s rookie season was a disappointment, but his second year in the NFL was a disaster, the pressure of which was clearly getting to him. Now Agholor finds himself on the roster bubble as his third year with the Eagles commences, and it’s fair to wonder what the wide receiver’s mindset is like in 2017.

“Confident and comfortable,” Agholor said Tuesday at the NovaCare Complex, where phase three of OTAs had just begun.

Earlier in the day, Agholor had been involved at practice — cycling in with the first-team offense and getting plenty of looks, too. Later, he would be the last player to leave the field, continuing to run sprints alone after practice ended. Finally, back in the locker room, Agholor explained the epiphany he arrived at during the offseason, and how he knows he’s ready to put 2016 behind him.

“I just had a realization that the only thing that matters is the current situation,” Agholor said. “I’m here, I have an opportunity to get better and make myself a better football player.”

None of this means everything is about to click for Agholor, and he’s suddenly going to perform up to his status as a first-round pick. The Eagles clearly weren’t counting on that, either, when they signed Alshon Jeffery and Torrey Smith in free agency, then selected two more receivers in the draft.

If Agholor intends to turn his career around, a fresh outlook isn’t a bad place to start.

Failing to meet expectations and under relentless scrutiny, Agholor’s demeanor changed over the course of last season. Frustrations finally boiled over during a postgame rant after an Eagles loss to the Cowboys. Four weeks later, he was a healthy scratch against the Packers. Though Agholor suited up for the final five games, there was no discernable change from a production standpoint.

“That’s in the past,” Agholor said. “I practiced today. I got after it today. Anything that happened back then, it happened for a reason.”

Agholor — who turned 24 Wednesday — attributed the bulk of his struggles to youth and inexperience while denying mental or confidence issues were to blame for his performance. With only 59 receptions for 648 yards and three touchdowns to show after two years, the Eagles couldn’t wait for him to grow up any longer, which led to Jeffery and Smith being brought aboard.

“I took it for what it was,” Agholor said. “I said, ‘This was what happened, this is the new opportunity, so every day, just focus on getting better at some aspect of it.’

“It’s all about getting better consistently each day, even if it’s just a little. At the end of the day, the whole world will be like, ‘Man, this is the product?’ Some of the best players in this league, they didn’t just become really great the first day there. It took a process and continuous progression every day.”

But how exactly does Agholor go about making that jump? Because work ethic has never been a complaint, nor was talent a problem at USC, where he finished with 179 receptions for 2,571 yards and 20 touchdowns in 40 games.

There’s no telling whether Agholor will ever put it all together in the NFL. He has refined his approach, however.

“I focused on the simple grind, whether it’s conditioning, whether it was living weights,” Agholor said of offseason workouts. “I wasn’t trying to have just a miracle happen. I just started focusing on the simplest things.

“I got on the track and worked on my speed and worked on my conditioning. I was in the weight room, worked on my strength and my durability, making sure my muscles were working the right way. That’s all it was, little things like that.”

Coaches and teammates are seeing a difference in Agholor as well. Most of all, they believe competing against veterans like Jeffery and Smith will bring the best out of a young receiver still trying to find his way.

“Nelson's attitude has been great. He's worked extremely hard this offseason,” Eagles coach Doug Pederson said. “As I've said all along, competition sharpens you, and that's what I've seen from Nelson.”

“I feel like competition is what’s going to help breed production,” Eagles wide receiver Jordan Matthews said. “If you’ve got more guys coming in and working, you don’t have time to worry about this, this and this. You have to worry about going in and keeping your job, you have to worry about going in and making plays every single day, and that goes for everybody, not just Nelson.”

Agholor does not disagree.

“I thought it was a great opportunity for me to compete vs. some really good players,” Agholor said of Jeffery and Smith. “These guys have proven themselves in the league, so if I show that I’m capable of performing the same way they are, then I’m in the conversation.”

That might seem like wishful thinking, but for this brief period in OTAs, Agholor has the upper hand — he knows the offense. And even if the Eagles wanted to move on from Agholor this year, his contract is such that a release would cost more against the salary cap than if he was to remain on the roster.

Financial ramifications aside, Agholor’s spot on the final 53-man roster legitimately appears to be in jeopardy. His hope in the meantime is to make himself indispensable.

“I feel like I want to be one of the best players on this team, and that takes care of it right there,” Agholor said. “I want to be a guy when you watch him on tape, you’re like, ‘Yeah, I need him.’

“The best players play, and I want to be one of the best players.”

For all of the doubts about his confidence, Agholor has seldom had any trouble expressing a general belief that he belongs in the NFL. Any doubts he did have, he obviously did not entertain for very long, based on his goals in 2017.

“I love this game, and I want to play this game for a long time, so I’m not going to allow anybody besides myself determine how long I do this,” Agholor said. “This is only Year 3, and I want to play 10-plus. The only way I do that is making myself available and making myself a good football player.”

Coming off of a season that nearly caused him to lose his swagger and cool, Agholor is doing and saying all the right things again, even as the Eagles bring in potential replacements. Perhaps the notion that it feels like a step in the right direction speaks to how poorly those first two seasons went.