Four More Years: Flyers Extend Braydon Coburn

Four More Years: Flyers Extend Braydon Coburn

On the morning all the local precincts counted their ballots and announced who would come, go, and stay in office, the Flyers cast their vote to keep defenseman Braydon Coburn stationed on the Philadelphia blue line for another four years.

Despite being just 26, Coburn is the longest tenured Flyer currently on the roster. Tim Panaccio reports that he'll be paid $18 million over the next four seasons, with his annual cap hit increasing from $3.2 million to $4.5 million. What that means for the front office's decision-making on other pending free agents, including Matt Carle, remains to be seen.

If we learned anything this summer, it's that off-season signings are fairly unpredictable with the Flyers. Any idea we had as to the team's cap scenario in June was out the window as soon as the market opened. So it's hard to say with any certainty what today's signings and roster configurations mean to the Flyers' ability to retain free agent pieces they'll want next summer.

Still, with the team perennially close to the cap, any raises given to players who aren't elite at their positions are usually met with some degree of skepticism and worry over losing flexibility to sign or trade for new talent, or at least have some space for short-term injury needs. More than a few fans will likely bemoan this one accordingly.

What we do know is, a usually solid d-man who is neither particularly young nor anything close to old will likely be here for the foreseeable future. With Chris Pronger aging and susceptible to shot-related injuries as part of his job description and Kimmo Timonen putting more miles on a well-traveled odometer, the Flyers appear to have wanted to ensure they had a pair of sound defenders with plenty of good years ahead of them. Andrej Meszaros is also 26, and he's inked at a cap hit of $4 million per season through 2013-2014, per CapGeek.

Once considered an emerging high-end talent with offensive abilities, especially in the transition game, Coburn has largely settled into a more conventional blue line role. But, still just 26 and entering his prime, there's a solid chance he continues to mature as a player and makes his cap hit look like a bargain, which it may already be when when the next free agent period opens.

Temple DE Haason Reddick 'overwhelmed' after Cardinals take him 13th overall

Temple DE Haason Reddick 'overwhelmed' after Cardinals take him 13th overall

Haason Reddick started the next chapter in his success story Thursday night.

The Temple product was taken 13th overall by the Arizona Cardinals in the NFL draft. He becomes the second highest selection ever for a Temple player.

Reddick will call a new coast his home next season, but he has plenty in common with his new head coach Bruce Arians. Arians was Temple's head football coach from 1983-88.

"To play for a fellow Temple guy, that's special," Reddick said through a smile at the podium sporting a red tie to match his Cardinals fitted hat.

But that's not all of the ties Reddick has to Arians.

While Arians was at Temple, he coached running back Paul Palmer, a former Heisman Trophy runner-up who was selected 19th overall in the 1987 NFL draft. 

Palmer is an assistant coach at Haddon Heights High School in Camden, New Jersey where Reddick went to high school. Palmer witnessed the transformation Reddick went through from a cornerback at Haddon Heights to a dominant edge rusher for the Owls. 

"Coach (Palmer) coached me and now (Arians) is going to get a chance to coach me as well," Reddick said. "It's just like a generational thing. It's being passed down, passed down, passed down from Temple alums. That's special right there."

For Reddick, the process of walking across The Philadelphia Art Museum steps and hearing his named called in the city he played college football in was a long one. At one point, Reddick thought he was going to be a "regular college student."

Reddick walked-on to Temple and was told he wasn't being brought back by then-head coach Steve Addazio in 2013. 

But when Addazio left North Broad Street for the head coaching job at Boston College and Matt Rhule became the head coach, Francis Brown, the defensive backs coach, fought for Reddick to stay on the team.

Rhule trusted Brown and brought back Reddick, who helped Temple win its first conference championship since 1967. 

"I never thought what could come out of it until my junior year in college," Reddick said. "And I put in even more work the senior season and continued to grind, continued to work hard. And now that I’m here, I finally got my name called and it's still sinking in, man. It's still sinking in. I'm being overwhelmed by emotions but it's still sinking in."

Prior to getting a scholarship at Temple, his mother took out a loan for him to have a meal plan. His father was also always there to support Reddick when he was uncertain of his football career.

Reddick has often talked about getting his mother a house where the sun shines in the lead up to the draft. Somewhere in Arizona might be a good spot.

"It was beauftiful," Reddick said on getting the phone call from Cardinals general manager Steve Keim. "I'm glad I had the people I had around me. Most of the people there are people that stuck with me throughout this whole journey. And to be able to share that moment with them, I wouldn't want to spend that moment any other way."

NBA Playoffs: Raptors advance past Bucks despite blowing 25-point lead

NBA Playoffs: Raptors advance past Bucks despite blowing 25-point lead

MILWAUKEE -- DeMar DeRozan scored 32 points and the Toronto Raptors squandered a 25-point lead late in the third quarter before holding on for a 92-89 victory Thursday night over the Milwaukee Bucks to take their first-round playoff series in six games.

Cory Joseph had five points in a 9-0 run in the final 2 minutes, including a 3-pointer with 1:27 left, to help stave off the pesky Bucks.

The Raptors move on to face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference semifinals in a series that starts Monday. They'll need to work on finishing off opponents in the second half.

Jason Terry's 3 with 3:06 left gave the Bucks an 80-78 lead, completing an unlikely comeback from the 25-point deficit with 5:16 left in the third quarter. The Raptors looked as if they were on cruise control after DeMarre Carroll's 3 gave them the 71-46 advantage.

Giannis Antetokounmpo spearheaded the second-half rally for Milwaukee. He had 34 points.

But the Bucks finished one comeback short.

The furious effort appeared to sap the energy of the young Bucks. Even Antetokounmpo, a renowned gym rat, looked tired with his hands on hips as he caught his breath during fourth-quarter breaks. He played 47 minutes.

Antetokounmpo finished 13 of 23 from the field but was 2 of 6 in the fourth.

The Raptors could finally breathe easy after DeRozan went 2 of 2 from the foul line with 3.1 seconds to play for a three-point lead. Tony Snell's inbounds pass on the ensuing possession was intercepted by DeRozan (see full recap).