Fran Dunphy Discusses Eating Cake with Alonzo Lewis on the Last Day of the Man's Life

Fran Dunphy Discusses Eating Cake with Alonzo Lewis on the Last Day of the Man's Life

Following his team's 80-79 win over the La Salle Explorers on Wednesday night, La Salle graduate and Temple coach Fran Dunphy entered the media room and conducted a fairly routine press conference (save for his second argument of the year as to why "the carry" should be allowed in basketball).

After he exited, but before La Salle coach John Giannini sat down to address reporters, Dunphy re-entered the room, called all to attention, and paid tribute to the life of Big 5 Hall of Famer Alonzo Lewis.

Lewis, 77, scored 1,137 points in his career at La Salle and helped lead the Explorers to the 1955 NCAA Final, where they ultimately lost to Bill Russell's San Francisco. Lewis would go on to coach a number of local schools, most notably Chester High and Cheyney University.

He was killed tragically on Tuesday evening after being hit by a car while attempting to cross Henry Ave. He was on his way to Philadelphia University to watch the Catholic League Girls' semifinal between Archbishop Carroll and Neumann-Goretti.

Audio and text of Fran Dunphy's postgame comments on Alonzo Lewis and (as one would expect) words from John Chaney below...

"I go the Big 5 Hall of Fame yesterday, and I was thrilled to be there. One of my players, Matt Maloney, Mark Jackson, one of the Temple greats, Kelly Greenberg,  who I coached with at Penn for a long period of time, so I'm hobnobbing. I'm having the time of my life just because I know most of the room. I'm just having a tremendous time. And I get to eat my meal late. And I get back, I'm in the back of the room, and I sit down beside Alonzo Lewis.

"And I spent an hour with Alonzo Lewis yesterday afternoon. And, last night, the man lost his life in a tragic car accident. And I got the chance to be with that guy. A great La Salle player and a guy I admire so much as a human being. How many he kids that he helped along the way.

"When I got that phone call this morning. I've got to tell you, my heart was broken, for a lot of different reasons. And even if I hadn't been with him for that period of time, my heart still would have been broken. But to sit next to him...

"There was a piece of chocolate cake, and he said, I can't eat this. I would love to eat this, but I can't. But I'm going to bring it to my daughter, and she'll enjoy it. And it just, it blew my mind. I couldn't...and I need to tell that story, because of what I feel about Alonzo Lewis and the quality and the character and the integrity that the man lived his life.

"I'm just so proud to have known him. To be honest with you, I was proud to sit there with him, so much, yesterday afternoon. So, I apologize, go on, but I loved the guy and I feel so bad. Thanks."

Listen to the audio here:

Former Temple coach John Chaney, a lifelong friend of Lewis, was quoted in the Daily News, reminiscing about how he and Lewis used to kid each other about who owed the other milk from when they used to play one-one-one. Allegedly, they played for milk, rather than sodas (as Chaney wanted), because, according to Chaney, Lewis was a health nut.

Said Chaney: "He was a great basketball player, one of our great players...He will be somebody that, every time I look over my right or left shoulder, I'll always think that he'll be there."

RIP, Alonzo Lewis.

Sixers' trio of double-doubles overshadowed in loss to Knicks

Sixers' trio of double-doubles overshadowed in loss to Knicks

NEW YORK -- Carmelo Anthony stole the show on Saturday with 37 points and a game-winning shot against the Sixers.  

His dramatic bucket was the difference maker in the Knicks 110-109 victory (see story), but a deeper look into the box score tells another story of a strong comeback attempt fallen short.

While the Knicks were led by one player (Derrick Rose had 18 points and was the only other Knick to score more than 14), the Sixers fought back with standout efforts from a trio of starters.

The frontcourt of Jahlil Okafor, Robert Covington and Dario Saric combined for 67 points and 35 rebounds. That’s 61.4 percent of the Sixers' total offense and 70 percent of their production on the boards.

In a game remembered for one shot, don’t forget about these performances.

Okafor: 28 points, 10 rebounds (six offensive), one assist, 28:45

Okafor scored a season-high 28 points (three shy of his career-high) starting in place of the injured Joel Embiid. He was aggressive from the start, scoring 11 points in the first quarter alone. He followed that up with another 11 in the fourth. Down the stretch, Okafor scored the Sixers' final two baskets, including the critical go-ahead jumper with nine seconds left.

“There was a real bounce even at the start,” Brett Brown said of Okafor, who received treatment after the game and was not available to speak to the media. “He is such a gifted scorer when he has that fluid nature that we saw at the start. … I feel like there was a real mentality for Jahlil to look to score.”

The most significant aspect of Okafor’s game, though, was in the rebounding column. He has struggled on the boards -- his defense has been the knock on him since he entered the league. On Friday, he grabbed just two rebounds against the Wizards while Richaun Holmes had 10 off the bench.

That changed on Saturday. Okafor pulled down six rebounds … in his first 11 minutes. That equaled his total from the past two games combined. Okafor gave the Sixers a glimpse into what they hope to see more of from their man in the middle.

“Jah did an amazing job on both sides of the court,” Covington said. “He made a bunch of tough plays on the offensive and defensive end. He got a couple big rebounds for us, he does that a lot but we’ve just got to get him to keep doing it more consistently.”

Saric: 19 points, 15 rebounds (six offensive), five assists, 39:34

How do you keep up with 20 points and 11 rebounds on Friday? Post a 19-point, 15-rebound double-double the next night (a career-high in boards).

Check out Saric’s total numbers from in his last two games: 39 points, 17 for 36 field goal shooting, 26 rebounds, nine assists and 73 minutes. Saric ranks second among all rookies in double-doubles (seven) behind only teammate Embiid.

“That’s massive numbers by any standards,” Brown said. “His versatility and his skill package, all under the roof of how competitive he is, makes him a very, very unique rookie.”

There has been an increase in Saric’s ball movement of late. His comfort level and growing team chemistry is translating into more assists.

“I just think he’s just so at peace within himself, and so his game takes the same type of shape,” Brown said. “It’s not forced.”

Saric’s game has been driven by effort from the beginning of his rookie season. He approaches each play with a high level of intensity and his stat lines reflect his mentality.

“We fought until the end,” Saric said. “We never gave up.”

Covington: 20 points, 10 rebounds, three steals, two blocks, 38:53

Covington’s locker was crowded after the game as he was the one who guarded Anthony on the final shot. Yet, in spite of being tasked with Anthony, Covington still posted a 20-and-10 double-double and came up with a major defensive play down the stretch.

With the Sixers trailing 108-107 with just over 30 seconds to play, Covington picked off Lance Thomas’ pass to start a fast break. This steal started a Sixers possession that eventually led to Okafor scoring the go-ahead basket. Covington is averaging 3.4 steals in his last five games.

“He helped us coach him to being a two-way player. Now he’s for real,” Brown said of Covington before the game. “I look at him as somebody that has just grown right before us all and bought in as a wonderful teammate, is a two-way player, is amongst the NBA’s elite wing defenders when you look at his position and can guard multiple people. That has come through work."

Flyers Notes: Wayne Simmonds, Flyers not giving up hope with 21 games left

Flyers Notes: Wayne Simmonds, Flyers not giving up hope with 21 games left

PITTSBURGH – Wayne Simmonds remained defiant.

Yes, the Flyers have lost seven of their last nine games. Yes, they are five points out of the last wild-card spot in the Eastern Conference.
 
But it's not over in terms of the playoffs.

"We played a great game, but unfortunately, it didn't go our way," Simmonds said after the 4-2 loss to the Penguins in the Stadium Series outdoor game at Heinz Field (see game recap).

"It wasn't good enough. I don't know what to say, guys. We have 21 games left and a never-say-die attitude. We're gonna keep pushing, no matter what. We've got to be desperate every game and play it as if it’s our last."

The Flyers had their chances and their moments. When Shayne Gostisbehere scored his first goal in 34 games early in the third period, it was a 3-2 game and momentum had been building in the Flyers' favor.

Then a key moment. A lost faceoff and the puck goes back to the point where Chad Ruhwedel fires so quickly that goalie Michal Neuvirth couldn't track the puck.

That was it. Game over.

"We brought it back [to 3-2]," Simmonds said. "We just had to get the tying goal and it slipped away. … We've got to score."

Still, there is time to regroup again with 21 games left.

"We have to have a short memory," Simmonds said. "Whether it's a good game or bad game, you move on."

They’re moving on but they're not gaining traction.

Weal back in lineup
Jordan Weal (concussion symptoms) re-entered the lineup in place on Roman Lyubimov. Weal missed two games after suffering the injury Feb. 16 in Edmonton.

Weal moved to left wing on Claude Giroux’s line with Simmonds.

“It’s a short sample, but it’s his body of work since he has been with us over the last couple weeks,” coach Dave Hakstol said of moving Weal there.

Before his injury, Weal played left wing on Sean Couturier’s line with Jakub Voracek. Brayden Schenn went back to center Saturday night between Nick Cousins and Voracek. It was another new line for Schenn.

If you’re wondering, Schenn has played left wing 33 times this season in 58 games.

Weal said he “felt good” and seemed excited to play in an NHL outdoor game.

Midway into the game, Michael Raffl went back to the top line and Weal moved to a line with Couturier and Dale Weise.

Weal played 15:43.

Power-play position
Shayne Gostisbehere played the point this game with the first unit and not the half wall. He also scored a goal there.

Coach Dave Hakstol has been rotating him from the point to the half-wall depending upon the personnel on the ice.

"It's a little bit of an adjustment no matter where I am," Gostisbehere said. "It's just nice to be on the power play. Whatever position they put me in out there, up top or on the wing, it's something I have to be ready for. I think I'm comfortable in both spots."

Outdoors
General manager Ron Hextall liked the outdoor game concept.

"It’s unique," Hextall said. "When they first started, I don’t love change. I was a little skeptical, I guess. I think they’re terrific. I really do.

"It’s good for the game. People watch an outdoor game and will pick that game because it’s an outdoor game. There is something about them. They’re neat."