Guest Post: An Open Letter to SI and Tom Verducci

Guest Post: An Open Letter to SI and Tom Verducci

A lot of folks in Philly are less than thrilled with Sports Illustrated's decision to not give the Phillies' first World Series win in 28 years its own cover. Nationally, the win was but a post-it on a picture of upright citizen Albert Haynesworth. In the mid-Atlantic region, the prominences were reversed, but a text box sullies the great picture of our moment of moments. In the following letter to SI and Tom Verducci, who penned the cover-crowding letter to Bug Selig, Dan Roche sums what a lot of Philadelphians are feeling.


I am writing to you as a life-long fan of both the Phillies and your
magazine. Having experienced plenty of disappointment by the former,
the latest dose from your publication was no less severe.

The city of Philadelphia waited a quarter-century between major sports
championships. And for this reader, the anticipation of seeing how the
event would be immortalized by the photographers and wordsmiths at SI
is just as integral as the celebration in the streets on the night of
the clinching game and the subsequent parade that followed.

The last -- and only -- time the Phillies conquered Baseball's Mount
Olympus, back in 1980, they were passed over for the cover of the
subsequent SI issue by marathoner Alberto Salazar (take a second to
think about that). When I received the latest issue in the mail, I
hoped for retribution. I began at the photo of an enraptured Brad Lidge
and Carlos Ruiz, and making my way down the cover (which I imagined
framing in my unborn child's room), saw that the picture had been
sullied by a box filled with the beginning of a letter from columnist
Tom Verducci to MLB Commissioner Bud Selig. (I now know by skimming
your website that the national cover went not to the Phillies, but to
Albert Haynesworth, who, at last check, hasn't won anything besides a
5-game suspension for stomping a helmetless foe 2 seasons ago.)


I immediately opened to the article, which only intensified my
apoplexy. Verducci mentions the Phillies only tangentially to make his
points to improve the World Series to make it more fan-friendly. Well,
sir, I am a fan, and friendly is not what I'm feeling right now.

Verducci manages to step off the soapbox long enough to give back story
on Charlie Manuel's journey through hardship. During this portion of
the article (paragraph 23), we stumble over the fact that yes, the
Phillies won the 2008 World Series. And only after the end of the 30th
paragraph (of 32) does Verducci stop to mention any of the players by
name. Maybe space-filler?

I've never written a letter like this to voice my displeasure. I
certainly hope Mr. Verducci got Commissioner Selig's attention with
this article, and elicited a response that is within a toll call of the
feelings I'm experiencing right now.

This article is self-serving, aimless drivel. And if folks weren't
interested in watching the World Series, as you imply, they certainly
wouldn't have wasted any time side-stepping the photos that bracketed
your pointless ramblings.

At the risk of prolonging a stereotype, Verducci, boo.

Note: SI also released a Commemorative Edition. Perhaps with the regular issue covers, they hoped to sell more of that? We're a little puzzled by the decision, with an obvious bias.

Report: Brett Brown accuses longtime friend of defrauding him of $750,000

brett-brown.jpg

Report: Brett Brown accuses longtime friend of defrauding him of $750,000

Sixers head coach Brett Brown is in Australia this week, where he has accused longtime friend and former Australian men's national team assistant coach Shane Heal of defrauding him of $750,000, according to the Australian Associated Press.

Brown invested $250,000 into each of three companies for which Heal was the sole director. Brown wasn't given a legal title regarding the companies and didn't know the specifics of how the money would be used.

"I assumed that the money was going to be used for what Shane told me it was going to be used for," Brown said. "Because it was a friend that I had for 25 years."

Heal was charged last year by the Australian Securities and Investments Commission following an investigation relating to alleged misconduct in 2008, 2009 and 2010, according to the AAP.

The sides return to court in Brisbane on July 20.

Heal played in the NBA for the Minnesota Timberwolves in 1996-97 and was with the San Antonio Spurs in 2003.

Tonight's lineup: Odubel Herrera leads off; Cesar Hernandez (groin) out

Tonight's lineup: Odubel Herrera leads off; Cesar Hernandez (groin) out

A day after going 0 for 5 with five strikeouts, Odubel Herrera is leading off for the Phillies in their series opener Friday night against the Reds (see game notes).

It's the first time Herrera is leading off since last Aug. 19, a span of 84 games.

Cesar Hernandez gets the night off. He's been dealing with a groin pull for 10 days, manager Pete Mackanin said Friday.

Andres Blanco bats second and plays second.

Maikel Franco is back in the six-hole after going 1 for 5 with two strikeouts in the cleanup spot Thursday. Tommy Joseph bats fourth and Michael Saunders fifth.

Cameron Rupp, who walked three times in Thursday's win over the Rockies, catches Aaron Nola and bats seventh.

1. Odubel Herrera, CF
2. Andres Blanco, 2B
3. Aaron Altherr, LF
4. Tommy Joseph, 1B
5. Michael Saunders, RF
6. Maikel Franco, 3B
7. Cameron Rupp, C
8. Freddy Galvis, SS
9. Aaron Nola, P