Advance! Flyers Deliver Knockout Blow in Game 7

Advance! Flyers Deliver Knockout Blow in Game 7

Win or lose, this series would have likely gone down as one of the most entertaining in recent memory. The fact that the good guys came out on top though, after being down by three goals in an elimination game, and won a Game 7 in just about the most convincing fashion possible—5-2—well, you couldn't script it any better than that.

Simply put, the Flyers beat the Sabres in every way imagineable, from the time the puck dropped until the final horn mercifully sounded. They stormed out of the gate scorching hot with an onslaught of scoring chances in the opening period, outshooting Buffalo an unbelievable 16-2 in the first 20 minutes. Ryan Miller almost held up under the intense pressure, but Braydon Coburn's shot from the blue line with 29 seconds remaining seemed to fool the enemy netminder, and snuck through the five hole to give Philly the 1-0 lead after one.

In the second period, the boys decided it was time to warm up the power play, scoring on consecutive man advantages. It took all of five seconds to find twine on their first opportunity. Claude Giroux was able to get the puck out to Mike Richards off the faceoff, and the captain blasted a shot from the point that found a crashing Danny Briere's stick directly in front of the net for a slam dunk. Giroux would earn the assist again on the following power play, his rocket from the slot-area deflecting in off the stick of James van Riemsdyk, who was perched comfortably in front of Miller.

Period three was little more than a formality. Ville Leino increased the lead to four, sending a laser over Miller's shoulder that wound up sending the All Star goalie to the locker room. It looked like a tough angle for Ville, but Miller overplayed the short side, and he had virtually no chance to get his glove hand up in time to make the save. The Sabres threatened briefly, cutting the deficit to three, but Dan Carcillo notched a garbage goal with less than 10 minutes remaining. The combination of it putting the game almost certainly out of reach, and it being the Flyers' instigator scoring the knockout blow, will surely leave a bad taste in the opponents' mouths over the long off-season ahead. A late goal by the Sabres proved meaningless.

I'm sure Matt will have plenty to say about Game 7 and the series in its entirety, but I think you can trace the momentum change in this series back to Game 5. Even though the Flyers ultimately lost that game in overtime, and had the goaltender issues again in Game 6, it was only when they fell behind by three goals on Friday that the pressure really ramped up. They seemed to get more aggressive, both in the forecheck where they began noticably outworking Buffalo, but also with their defensemen who were pinching more frequently to keep plays alive in the offensive zone.

Whatever it was, they need to stick with what worked over these final three games, regardless of who they play next. And we don't know who that will be yet, or when—only that there will be another Game 1, coming soon to a Wells Fargo Center near you.

AP Photo

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Wentz had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”