Danny & The Kings Ransom Duo Shred Leafs

Danny & The Kings Ransom Duo Shred Leafs

The Toronto Maple Leafs may not be the best barometer for a playoff-bound team. They've already been eliminated from playoff eligibility for the seventh consecutive season, and on Thursday, they had a first-time NHL starter in net due to a fluke injury to Jonas Gustavsson in pregame warmups. In terms of competition, the best they had to offer was the "dangerous team with nothing left to lose" riff. 
The Flyers were also without their starter in net, a situation Kulp took a good look at prior to the game. Would a change in goal reverse the Flyers' recent fortunes? At least for a night, no… Not at all. Sergei Bobrovsky was as good as anyone could've asked, and the line of Danny Briere, Wayne Simmonds, and Brayden Schenn led the way in a 7-1 decimation. 
Some must-see goals below, if you didn't catch the game live. Even if you did, this was a fun one to relive. 
Danny Briere didn't score on the night, but he continued his warming trend in a huge way. Centering the two players the Flyers got from the LA Kings in return for Mike Richards, Briere notched a career-high four assists, and they weren't just the "last guy who touched the puck before the scorer" variety. 
Schenn and Simmonds each scored a pair, giving them 11 and 25 on the season, respectively. Matt Read ripped his 23rd of the season, Eric Wellwood his fifth, and Jake Voracek his 15th. Seven goals on the board, and none came from the tape of Claude Giroux, Scott Hartnell, or Jaromir Jagr. No objections here. 
Schenn opened the scoring before 6 minutes had ticked off the clock, gathering a misfired puck off the stick of his brother Luke, and sniping it past Rynnas. The Flyers have proven that early deficits aren't fatal, but it's still a relief when they're the side with the early goal. 

The Good Schenn also scored the second goal of the game, this time benefiting from the play of the team's elder statement. Killing a penalty, the Leafs managed a frantic lobbing clear, but couldn't control it in the neutral zone. With the patience of a 664-goal scorer, Jaromir Jagr held it up at the blue line while the forwards cleared the zone, then hit Briere with a pass as he regained the zone. Briere skated up the near-side slot, drawing Dion "Suck It" Phaneuf's attention, then fed Schenn on the back door. 
Psst, Dion… even on the PK, you want to be responsible for the pass there. 
Mikhail Grabovski would make it a one-goal game before the period was over, which in retrospect reminds us that this game wasn't dominated by the Flyers for all 60 minutes. The Leafs pressured the puck and torched the Flyers in transition, with Tim Connolly sending a long pass through three Flyers' defenders and setting the dangerous Grabovsky free. He put a brilliant move on Bobrovsky, one that no one will hang on Bob.


Just nasty. 
As they did in the first period, the Flyers opened the scoring relatively early in the second, with Wayne Simmonds making everyone in blue look silly on the 4-on-4. Briere fluttered a shot toward goal, where Simmonds sticked it down, then chased it behind the net. After shedding Toronto's Carl Gunnarsson and muscling it to the edge of the trapezoid, Simmonds stickhandled and made center Tyler Bozak back off, presumably thinking Simmer was going to pass it. Along with his teammates, even Rynnas was fooled, leaving his near post and getting beaten like a goalie no one's every heard of. 
If you have a weak stomach for terrible defense, do not watch this video:
Didn't it look like the Gunnarsson and Bozak were on rewind? 
I don't know why the Leafs didn't give more respect to a man with more than 20 goals, but every one of the Toronto players involved in the play skates AWAY from Simmonds, giving him an open channel toward the net. 
Plays like that, on top of eight years without playoff hockey (including the lockout season) are actually pretty good reasons for Toronto fans serenading their team with "Let's Go Blue Jays" chants for the last 10 minutes of the game. 
The Maple Leafs' defense was simply atrocious on Thursday night, and the Flyers took advantage early and often. 
Matty Boy Read also tallied in the second period, a short-handed effort aided by Max Talbot. Read made a great play to advance the puck to Talbot as the two criss-crossed the defense. Talbot attemted a pass that was blocked in on Rynnas, and Read kept his movement going toward the net, then made easy work of the rebound. 
Tremendous amount of pressure and confidence for two forwards killing a penalty to put the Flyers up, 4-1. 
There was some slop by the Flyers to start the third period, but they still managed to score within 6 minutes, just as they did in the first and second frames. This time it was Eric Wellwood's turn. He made a gorgeous move to get some space off the boards, Matt Read grabbed the loose puck, then deftly sent it back to Wellwood, who buried it far side. 
I mean, holy shit. That move by Wellwood, that perfect pass by Read… We've said/heard it all season, and it's because you really can't say enough about the contributions made by Flyers rookies. 
While not a rookie, another Flyers newcomer added the team's sixth goal, when Jake Voracek scored his 15th of the season. 
Simmonds capped it all off with just under 8 minutes to go in the game, finishing Another Danny Creation. Jagr skated it ahead to gain the zone and bring the defense in, then slid it to Briere, who grabbed his fourth assist of the night as he passed it across to a streaking Simmonds. Simmer had three-quarters of the net to choose from and didn't miss. 

So what can we take from this game? Mostly things we already knew. The Flyers have tremendous scoring depth, with a versatile group of rookies contributing in all scenarios. Sergei Bobrovsky is a capable backup, and if the Flyers are disciplined on defense, they can give whomever's in net a relatively easy night. 
Now the real tests begin though. Only five games remain, all against teams currently scheduled to play in the second season. Ottawa and Pittsburgh are on the weekend docket, then the Rangers and Sabres, and finally the Penguins again to close out the season. Buckle up. 
NOTESThe Flyers on a 4-on-4, a power play, and the penalty kill, all on plays that bullied the Leafs' defense. This, more than the loss of Joffrey Lupul, is why Toronto won't make the playoffs. Again. 
#17 had a great night, playing the enforcer role when forwards took liberties after frozen pucks and especially when Phaneuf went after Brayden Schenn. Phaneuf ducked him and kept after Schenn, drawing two minors to Simmer's one. A minute after returning from the box, Simmonds scored his 25th of the season. 
This was the second two-goal game of Schenn's rookie season, and all 11 of his tallies have come since he opened his NHL account on a baseball field. 
While praising the Flyers' rookies, we can't leave off the efforts of Sean Couturier. His line was once again slotted against the opponent's top trio, and once again they were effective.  Killing penalties and playing on a shutdown line, Cooter logged 5:36 more ice time than Claude Giroux, who got some rest in the blowout.  G played 13:08, Jagr 13:24, and Hartnell 11:19. 
Bobrovsky only had to make 16 saves all night. His defense limited the Leafs to five SOG in the first period, then just six in each of the next two. Bob seemed to get sharper as the game wore on, though it's hard to tell on so few pad-testers. 
The Flyers beat the Maple Leafs in each of their four contests this season. 
Last time the Leafs were in the playoffs, the Flyers eliminated them. The telecast showed a legendary goal, when Sami Kapanen was leveled by a hit but managed to get off the ice so that Jeremy Roenick could get on and score. 
One more road win and the Flyers tie last season's franchise record of 25. 

Ryan Howard's miserable May continues as Tigers out-power Phillies

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Ryan Howard's miserable May continues as Tigers out-power Phillies

DETROIT — Back when they were racking up National League East titles and filling Citizens Bank Park night after night, the Phillies could slug with anyone.
 
Those days are gone.
 
So even on a night when they got some power from two young up-and-comers in their lineup, the Phillies still couldn’t get enough to match up with the Detroit Tigers on Monday night.
 
“We don’t have enough pop to go blow for blow with them,” manager Pete Mackanin said.
 
The Tigers belted four home runs, three against starting pitcher Vince Velasquez, in beating the Phillies, 5-4, at Comerica Park (see Instant Replay).
 
Maikel Franco and Tommy Joseph both homered for the Phillies, but Ryan Howard, no longer even close to the player he was during those aforementioned title years, slipped deeper into the May quicksand. He went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts to fall to .156 on the season. He is 4 for 48 (.083) in the month of May.
 
“Man, it’s been brutal,” Howard said after the game. “I’m not going to lie. I need some breaks, man. It’s been tough. I’ve hit some balls hard, but they’re not finding any real estate out there.
 
“I have to keep grinding and swinging. Luckily, it’s still early to get it turned around.”
 
Yes, it’s early for some guys.
 
But it might not be that early for Howard. He’s 36 and in the final year of his contract. His slump has coincided with Joseph’s ascension from the minors. Joseph played first base Monday night and looked good at the position. In addition to hitting a game-tying homer in the sixth, he had a double. Half of his six hits in his first seven games in the majors have been for extra bases.
 
Joseph will continue to play first base while Howard serves as the designated hitter in the final two games of the interleague series in Detroit. After that, Joseph is expected to start against lefty Jon Lester in Chicago on Friday. If he keeps hitting — and Howard keeps struggling — the situation could be ripe for Mackanin to continue to play Joseph, even against the right-handers Howard usually sees.
 
“I'm going to look at it a week at a time,” Mackanin said. “We'll see. At some point it might come to that, but I can't say it's imminent.”
 
If Howard starts spending more time on the bench, it will be part of a downhill progression that started in the second half of last season when he became a platoon player. Will a progression to the bench ultimately lead to his being released in the coming weeks? Well, if Joseph keeps hitting and continues to earn playing time, management may have to seriously ponder the move.
 
Even with Franco and Joseph hitting home runs, the Phillies didn’t have enough to match the Tigers’ thunder.
 
Miguel Cabrera belted two home runs and in the seventh inning clubbed his 500th career double. He then came around to score the go-ahead run on a single by Victor Martinez.
 
Entering the game, the Tigers were among the top teams in the American League in batting average (.265), runs per game (4.60), homers (56) and OPS (.758).
 
Meanwhile, the Phillies couldn’t get much lower in offense. They ranked near the bottom in the National League in batting average (.233), runs per game (3.23), homers (32) and OPS (.651).
 
“You look up and down their lineup on the scoreboard and it looks like everybody is hitting .300 with eight or 10 home runs,” Mackanin said. “It can be daunting.
 
“The middle of their lineup hurt us with the long ball. We knew they were swinging the bats well lately. They weren’t earlier. Now they’re swinging well and we couldn’t contain them.
 
“We got 12 hits of our own. But they’ve got a lot of power on that team.”
 
The Phillies are at the start of a challenging trip — three in Detroit followed by three against the Cubs in Wrigley Field. The Cubs have the majors’ best record. The Phillies, a surprising four games over .500, will be tested on this trip.
 
They did not pass the first test. Velasquez had trouble commanding his pitches and for the second straight start ran a high pitch count. He took a 3-1 lead to the mound in the fifth, but it evaporated quickly under the weight of homers by J.D. Martinez and Cabrera. Reliever Colton Murray also gave up a homer in the inning. He also allowed the go-ahead run in the seventh as Mackanin held David Hernandez back in case the Phils got a lead.
 
“Velasquez didn’t have any command of his secondary pitches, pretty basic stuff, and he left some fastballs over the plate,” Mackanin said. “You have to throw quality pitches to a lineup like this. If you make mistakes against them, they don’t miss. If you don’t command your secondary pitches against good hitters, they become like sharks and smell blood and hit the fastball.”
 
Velasquez said he should have gotten the loss, not Murray.
 
“You can’t shy away from hitters and I did that,” he said. “You’ve got to pitch inside. I pitched around them.
 
“I’ve got to do something about this. I’ve got to challenge hitters.”

With game on the line, Pete Mackanin benches his best player for lack of hustle

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With game on the line, Pete Mackanin benches his best player for lack of hustle

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DETROIT — Phillies manager Pete Mackanin made a strong statement Monday night when he benched his best hitter in the seventh inning of a tie game.
 
With Odubel Herrera on the bench for the final innings, the Phillies went on to lose, 5-4, to the Detroit Tigers (see Instant Replay).
 
Mackanin did not regret his decision to yank Herrera and his team-high .335 batting average from the game.
 
“It’s important to me to set that tone,” Mackanin said. “When you don’t hustle, I’ve got a problem.”
 
Herrera had singled in each of his first three at-bats. He drove in the Phillies’ first run with a hit in the third inning.
 
But when he bounced back to the pitcher and took his time getting to first base in the seventh, Mackanin abruptly pulled him. Even Ryan Howard said something to Herrera in the dugout.
 
“He didn’t run,” Mackanin said. “One of the ingredients to our success to this point is the fact that guys play with energy and they play hard. We’re training them to play the game the right way and not running is not the right way.”
 
Herrera said he did not run because he was “frustrated” and “angry” with the at-bat. He said Tigers reliever Justin Wilson “got in his head” by varying his delivery times. Herrera even mentioned that Wilson quick-pitched him.
 
“The pitcher was playing with me,” he said. “I have to learn from it. I didn’t think [Mackanin] was going to bench me, but I understand why. I can’t argue. I was frustrated. I respect the decision. I know that I did wrong. I have to learn from my mistakes and it won’t happen again.”
 
Mackanin is a huge fan of Herrera. He has predicted the 24-year-old Venezuelan will someday win a batting title.
 
But Mackanin indicated after Monday night’s game that Herrera might be developing some bad habits — at least when it comes to the hustle that Mackanin values. The front office values it, too. Playing with “energy” is something the front office frequently says it wants to see, and the ability to get his players to play with energy is one of Mackanin’s strengths.
 
“I’ve seen it in the past and it’s been trickling in,” Mackanin said of Herrera’s occasional lapses in hustle. “I didn’t like it and I made the decision. He knows he should have run.”
 
Jonathan Papelbon put a chokehold on Bryce Harper’s neck last year in Washington for a similar transgression.
 
In the Phillies’ dugout Monday night, Herrera got a little talking-to from Howard.
 
“That was great to see,” Mackanin said.
 
Said Howard: “Doobie's got a lot of promise. He’s going to be around this game for a long time. He makes things happen. He brings energy to the game.
 
“The pitcher lost the grip and had to double-pump. If you’re running hard, maybe he makes a bad throw and you’re on base.
 
“I just told him, ‘You’ve got to keep going. I know it’s not the at-bat you wanted, but look at me, bro, I’m still out there grinding.’ If he’s running there, the pitcher could throw it away and he could be on second and we could squeeze a run out.”
 
Howard went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts to fall to .156 on the season. He is 4 for 48 (.083) in the month of May (see story).
 
Mackanin said his message to Herrera was complete. Herrera will be back in the starting lineup on Tuesday night.

NBA Playoffs: Raptors hold off Cavs to even East Finals 2-2

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NBA Playoffs: Raptors hold off Cavs to even East Finals 2-2

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TORONTO -- A series that once looked lopsided is now even.

Kyle Lowry scored 35 points, including a driving layup in the final minute, and DeMar DeRozan had 32 as the Toronto Raptors evened the Eastern Conference Finals by beating the Cleveland Cavaliers 105-99 in Game 4 on Monday night.

DeMarre Carroll scored 11 points and Bismack Biyombo had 14 rebounds as Toronto improved to 8-2 at home this postseason and got back on level terms after big losses in Games 1 and 2.

"We've been counted out, and we like that challenge," DeRozan said.

The next challenge for Toronto? Game 5 on Wednesday night in Cleveland, where the Raptors are 0-3 this season, losing by a combined 72 points.

"We have to continue to make sure that when they punch, we punch back," Lowry said. "And if they punch three times, we punch four times."

The Raptors are 2-6 on the road in the playoffs.

After a 10-0 start to these playoffs, the Cavaliers are counting on home court advantage to help them reach their second straight Finals.

"Going back home we have to play a lot better and I think we will," LeBron James said.

Cleveland lost consecutive playoff games to an Eastern Conference opponent for the first time since dropping the final three games of the conference semifinals to Boston in 2010.

"We had a few defensive breakdowns that you can't have down the stretch of a game, especially in the playoffs," Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said. "They executed every time we made a mistake."

James scored 29 points and Kyrie Irving had 26 for the Cavaliers, who trailed by as many as 18 points. Channing Frye scored nine of his 12 points in the fourth quarter.

Lowry scored nine in the fourth and DeRozan had 12, connecting on five of six shots.

"It's a cakewalk for me when (Lowry) gets going," DeRozan said. "It opens up everything."

The Raptors led 78-69 to begin the fourth but Frye made consecutive 3-pointers as Cleveland opened the final quarter with an 8-0 run, cutting it to 78-77. The Cavaliers made their first 11 shots of the fourth quarter.

"It wasn't enough because we got off to a horrible first half once again in this building and you're playing catch up the whole game," James said.

Frye's errant 3-point attempt at 4:12 was Cleveland's first miss of the fourth. DeRozan made two free throws at the other end and, after another miss by Frye, Carroll made one of two to put Toronto up 99-96 with 3:23 to go.

A long 3 by Irving made it 101-99 with 2:00 left, but DeRozan answered with a driving bank shot at 1:33. Toronto got the ball back after Biyombo blocked J.R. Smith's 3, and Biyombo kept the offensive possession alive by rebounding Lowry's missed shot. After a timeout, Lowry let the shot clock wind down before driving for the decisive layup, making it 105-99 with 22 seconds to go.

Toronto jumped out to a 13-5 lead as Cleveland missed eight of its first 10 shots. Following a timeout, the Cavs made five of their next six to cut the deficit but the Raptors led 27-24 after one quarter.

Lowry scored 15 points in the second, making three of Toronto's four 3-pointers, as the Raptors opened a 57-41 halftime lead despite not shooting a single free throw in the first two quarters. It marked the first time a team led by 15 or more at halftime in a conference finals game without shooting a free throw since Game 2 of the 2001 East Finals between Milwaukee and Philadelphia. The Bucks made two of six from the line, the fewest ever made in an NBA playoff game at the time.

DeRozan shot Toronto's first free throws at 6:13 of the third after being tackled by Smith on a drive. The foul drought came after Raptors coach Dwane Casey was fined $25,000 for criticizing the officials following Toronto's Game 3 win.

Fans cheered derisively when Matthew Dellavedova was called for Cleveland's first foul of the game at 8:56 of the second.

Not much to Love
After shooting 3 for 19 in Game 3, Kevin Love shot 4 for 14 in Game 4. He finished with 10 points. Love did not play in the fourth after appearing to injure his left ankle when he stepped on referee David Guthrie late in the third. "It didn't feel too great," Love said. Lue said Love's health was "no concern."

Fair and foul
Cleveland didn't shoot any free throws in the third quarter and had just two in the fourth. Twelve of Toronto's 19 free throws came in the fourth.

Tip-ins
Cavaliers: James and Irving each had six assists. ... Cleveland shot 3 for 23 from 3-point range in the first half. The finished 13 for 41. . Cleveland's Dahntay Jones served a one-game suspension for hitting Biyombo in the groin in Game 3.

Raptors: Raptors C Jonas Valanciunas was active but did not play. He's been out since spraining his right ankle in the third quarter of Game 3 against Miami on May 7. ... Toronto is 10-1 in the playoffs when holding opponents below 100 points.