Danny & The Kings Ransom Duo Shred Leafs

Danny & The Kings Ransom Duo Shred Leafs

The Toronto Maple Leafs may not be the best barometer for a playoff-bound team. They've already been eliminated from playoff eligibility for the seventh consecutive season, and on Thursday, they had a first-time NHL starter in net due to a fluke injury to Jonas Gustavsson in pregame warmups. In terms of competition, the best they had to offer was the "dangerous team with nothing left to lose" riff. 
The Flyers were also without their starter in net, a situation Kulp took a good look at prior to the game. Would a change in goal reverse the Flyers' recent fortunes? At least for a night, no… Not at all. Sergei Bobrovsky was as good as anyone could've asked, and the line of Danny Briere, Wayne Simmonds, and Brayden Schenn led the way in a 7-1 decimation. 
Some must-see goals below, if you didn't catch the game live. Even if you did, this was a fun one to relive. 
Danny Briere didn't score on the night, but he continued his warming trend in a huge way. Centering the two players the Flyers got from the LA Kings in return for Mike Richards, Briere notched a career-high four assists, and they weren't just the "last guy who touched the puck before the scorer" variety. 
Schenn and Simmonds each scored a pair, giving them 11 and 25 on the season, respectively. Matt Read ripped his 23rd of the season, Eric Wellwood his fifth, and Jake Voracek his 15th. Seven goals on the board, and none came from the tape of Claude Giroux, Scott Hartnell, or Jaromir Jagr. No objections here. 
Schenn opened the scoring before 6 minutes had ticked off the clock, gathering a misfired puck off the stick of his brother Luke, and sniping it past Rynnas. The Flyers have proven that early deficits aren't fatal, but it's still a relief when they're the side with the early goal. 

The Good Schenn also scored the second goal of the game, this time benefiting from the play of the team's elder statement. Killing a penalty, the Leafs managed a frantic lobbing clear, but couldn't control it in the neutral zone. With the patience of a 664-goal scorer, Jaromir Jagr held it up at the blue line while the forwards cleared the zone, then hit Briere with a pass as he regained the zone. Briere skated up the near-side slot, drawing Dion "Suck It" Phaneuf's attention, then fed Schenn on the back door. 
Psst, Dion… even on the PK, you want to be responsible for the pass there. 
Mikhail Grabovski would make it a one-goal game before the period was over, which in retrospect reminds us that this game wasn't dominated by the Flyers for all 60 minutes. The Leafs pressured the puck and torched the Flyers in transition, with Tim Connolly sending a long pass through three Flyers' defenders and setting the dangerous Grabovsky free. He put a brilliant move on Bobrovsky, one that no one will hang on Bob.


Just nasty. 
As they did in the first period, the Flyers opened the scoring relatively early in the second, with Wayne Simmonds making everyone in blue look silly on the 4-on-4. Briere fluttered a shot toward goal, where Simmonds sticked it down, then chased it behind the net. After shedding Toronto's Carl Gunnarsson and muscling it to the edge of the trapezoid, Simmonds stickhandled and made center Tyler Bozak back off, presumably thinking Simmer was going to pass it. Along with his teammates, even Rynnas was fooled, leaving his near post and getting beaten like a goalie no one's every heard of. 
If you have a weak stomach for terrible defense, do not watch this video:
Didn't it look like the Gunnarsson and Bozak were on rewind? 
I don't know why the Leafs didn't give more respect to a man with more than 20 goals, but every one of the Toronto players involved in the play skates AWAY from Simmonds, giving him an open channel toward the net. 
Plays like that, on top of eight years without playoff hockey (including the lockout season) are actually pretty good reasons for Toronto fans serenading their team with "Let's Go Blue Jays" chants for the last 10 minutes of the game. 
The Maple Leafs' defense was simply atrocious on Thursday night, and the Flyers took advantage early and often. 
Matty Boy Read also tallied in the second period, a short-handed effort aided by Max Talbot. Read made a great play to advance the puck to Talbot as the two criss-crossed the defense. Talbot attemted a pass that was blocked in on Rynnas, and Read kept his movement going toward the net, then made easy work of the rebound. 
Tremendous amount of pressure and confidence for two forwards killing a penalty to put the Flyers up, 4-1. 
There was some slop by the Flyers to start the third period, but they still managed to score within 6 minutes, just as they did in the first and second frames. This time it was Eric Wellwood's turn. He made a gorgeous move to get some space off the boards, Matt Read grabbed the loose puck, then deftly sent it back to Wellwood, who buried it far side. 
I mean, holy shit. That move by Wellwood, that perfect pass by Read… We've said/heard it all season, and it's because you really can't say enough about the contributions made by Flyers rookies. 
While not a rookie, another Flyers newcomer added the team's sixth goal, when Jake Voracek scored his 15th of the season. 
Simmonds capped it all off with just under 8 minutes to go in the game, finishing Another Danny Creation. Jagr skated it ahead to gain the zone and bring the defense in, then slid it to Briere, who grabbed his fourth assist of the night as he passed it across to a streaking Simmonds. Simmer had three-quarters of the net to choose from and didn't miss. 

So what can we take from this game? Mostly things we already knew. The Flyers have tremendous scoring depth, with a versatile group of rookies contributing in all scenarios. Sergei Bobrovsky is a capable backup, and if the Flyers are disciplined on defense, they can give whomever's in net a relatively easy night. 
Now the real tests begin though. Only five games remain, all against teams currently scheduled to play in the second season. Ottawa and Pittsburgh are on the weekend docket, then the Rangers and Sabres, and finally the Penguins again to close out the season. Buckle up. 
NOTESThe Flyers on a 4-on-4, a power play, and the penalty kill, all on plays that bullied the Leafs' defense. This, more than the loss of Joffrey Lupul, is why Toronto won't make the playoffs. Again. 
#17 had a great night, playing the enforcer role when forwards took liberties after frozen pucks and especially when Phaneuf went after Brayden Schenn. Phaneuf ducked him and kept after Schenn, drawing two minors to Simmer's one. A minute after returning from the box, Simmonds scored his 25th of the season. 
This was the second two-goal game of Schenn's rookie season, and all 11 of his tallies have come since he opened his NHL account on a baseball field. 
While praising the Flyers' rookies, we can't leave off the efforts of Sean Couturier. His line was once again slotted against the opponent's top trio, and once again they were effective.  Killing penalties and playing on a shutdown line, Cooter logged 5:36 more ice time than Claude Giroux, who got some rest in the blowout.  G played 13:08, Jagr 13:24, and Hartnell 11:19. 
Bobrovsky only had to make 16 saves all night. His defense limited the Leafs to five SOG in the first period, then just six in each of the next two. Bob seemed to get sharper as the game wore on, though it's hard to tell on so few pad-testers. 
The Flyers beat the Maple Leafs in each of their four contests this season. 
Last time the Leafs were in the playoffs, the Flyers eliminated them. The telecast showed a legendary goal, when Sami Kapanen was leveled by a hit but managed to get off the ice so that Jeremy Roenick could get on and score. 
One more road win and the Flyers tie last season's franchise record of 25. 

Phils lose LHP in Rule 5 draft, exit winter meetings balancing present with future

Phils lose LHP in Rule 5 draft, exit winter meetings balancing present with future

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – The winter meetings ended Thursday morning with the Phillies sitting out the Rule 5 draft. The Phillies’ roster was at the 40-man limit and that prohibited the team from making a pick.

The Phils did lose one player in the draft as reliever Hoby Milner was selected by the Cleveland Indians. 

Milner, who turns 26 in January, is a left-hander who recently switched to a side-arm delivery. He had a 2.49 ERA in 49 games at Double A and Triple A in 2016.

Milner was eligible for the draft because he was not protected on the 40-man roster last month. The Indians selected him for $50,000. He must stay in the big leagues all season or be offered back to the Phillies for $25,000.

Andrew Pullin was a player the Phillies feared losing, but they hung on to the lefty-hitting outfielder. Pullin, 23, hit .322 with a .885 OPS between Single A and Double A in 2016. A late-season elbow injury prevented Pullin from playing in the Arizona Fall League and factored into the Phillies’ decision to leave him unprotected.

The Phillies selected one player, infielder Jorge Flores, in the minor-league phase of the draft. Flores had been in the Toronto system.

The Phils lost one player, 25-year-old pitcher Jairo Munoz, to Tampa Bay in the minor-league phase. Munoz pitched in the low minors in 2016.

With the winter meetings behind them, Phillies officials will head back to Citizens Bank Park to complete the construction of their 2017 roster. So far this winter, the Phils have re-signed starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson and added outfielder Howie Kendrick and relievers Joaquin Benoit, Pat Neshek and David Rollins.

Remaining on the Phillies’ to-do list is adding a backup infielder – Andres Blanco could return – and deciding whether to pursue a veteran hitter to play a corner outfield spot or give an opportunity to a young tandem such as Roman Quinn and Aaron Altherr. 

General manager Matt Klentak spoke often during the week about that balance he is trying to strike between improving the 2017 club while keeping intact long-range goals.

“Successfully balancing the present and the future is the single greatest challenge that a baseball operations department faces,” Klentak said. “We’ve talked about it all offseason. The decisions that we are making right now about giving playing time to a young player that has cut his teeth in Triple A and needs that opportunity to take the next step as opposed to a shorter-term solution from the outside – that’s one of the main challenges that we’ve run into this offseason.”

Time will tell which way the Phillies go on this matter. 

Even with Jordan Matthews' return, Paul Turner still in Eagles' plans

Even with Jordan Matthews' return, Paul Turner still in Eagles' plans

There were just two things on Paul Turner’s mind as he sprinted across the field early during the third quarter on Sunday, anticipating his first career NFL catch. 

Turner relayed them on Wednesday: 

1. “Make sure you get in [Carson Wentz’s] vision.” 

2. “You better catch this ball.” 

He did both. 

Turner, the 23-year-old undrafted receiver from Louisiana Tech, who has become a fan favorite since his stellar training camp and preseason, caught his first NFL pass during Sunday’s loss to the Bengals and it went for a big gain of 41 yards. 

On his first catch, the Eagles used the play-action to tilt the defense and Wentz threw a dart into a small window to hit Turner on an over route. Then, the rookie turned upfield with a ton of space in front of him. 

By the end of the afternoon, he caught six balls for 80 yards. It was the best receiving day for an Eagles rookie since Jordan Matthews in 2014 and was a better day than last year’s first-round pick, Nelson Agholor, has ever had. 

“It's always good to catch a few balls,” said Turner, who has been on the 53-man roster and active for just the past two games. “It gets your motor going and gets your confidence going. It just gets you more into the game and gets you excited. I think it does a lot for a person's confidence.”

Turner played 41 snaps against the Bengals in large part because Matthews was out with an ankle injury. Matthews predominantly plays in the slot, which is where head coach Doug Pederson and his coaching staff like Turner. 

“Honestly, that wasn't really my mindset going into the game,” Turner said when asked if he knew how much opportunity he’d have with Matthews out. “My mindset was to go in there and if my number was called, just go out there and make a play. Even if my number was called, just take care of my assignment and take care of the little details and I knew everything else would just take care of itself. I knew that if I got the ball, I'd be excited. But even if I didn't, just to go out there and just block, and give up myself for my teammates. That was my goal coming into the game and just try to stay focused on that.” 

It appears as though Turner has done enough to warrant keeping his playing time. As Matthews returned to practice on Wednesday — as a limited participant — Pederson said there will still be opportunities for Turner. 

“There are, there are,” Pederson said. “And these are things we talked about the last couple of days as a staff — getting Paul in there, even with Jordan coming back. I think it can be a benefit to the offense to have both of those guys ready to go.”

The Eagles still haven’t had more than four receivers active for any game this season. During the last two weeks when Turner has played, either Agholor or Matthews were out. 

“It means a lot that the coaching staff has confidence in me,” Turner said. “My biggest thing is just to come in here and just work each and every day in practice and just prepare in practice so I'm prepared when I go out there in the game.”