Flyers-Sabres Game 5: Everyone Completely Hate Each Other Now? Good.

Flyers-Sabres Game 5: Everyone Completely Hate Each Other Now? Good.

Four games into the opening round of the NHL playoffs, the Flyers and Sabres are giving us plenty of reasons to watch. Fans of both sides would probably prefer their team be up a game at this point, particularly Philadelphia, who entered the series as the favorite with their 2 seed. But as we see from year to year, there’s plenty of parity in the NHL, and seedings can mean next to nothing once the first puck is dropped. The home ice advantage can help, and the Flyers will look to reap that benefit tonight as the series comes back from lovely Buffalo. It’s the perfect point in the series to return home to Philly too. The Flyers and Sabres are knotted at a pair of wins apiece, and the shit has officially begun to hit the fan both on and off the ice. Such a sweet, sweet guy. Check out the video below on the escalating war of words between the two teams, plus what it might mean for tonight’s game.

Great to see how this type of back and forth through the media puts a smile on even Peter Laviolette’s face. I honestly can't recall him ever looking so happy. Of course, how can you not laugh when Lindy Ruff accuses you of whining? It’s also pretty hilarious to hear Danny Briere talk about how this is just Lindy being Lindy, and Danny would know after his all his seasons in Buffalo. 

I don’t know that I necessarily agree that this is all just for the media and fans though. As the on-ice action has gotten chippier, the chatter after the games has ratcheted up as well. Heading into game 5, these two teams hate each other. Trash talk often seems to spill over into games and vice-versa. You gotta love playoff hockey and the way a series can evolve from skirmish to battle to war. We could be in for a nasty night in South Philly. 

Photo by Flickr user boogerfingers. yep.

Unfortunately, it looks like the Flyers will be without the services of Jeff Carter and Chris Pronger, possibly for the rest of the series per Tim Panaccio's report. It is worrisome to have them both out for this key game in the series and what's sounding a bit more like the next few games at least. The depth we’ve heard and talked about for so long will be tested tonight.

It’s not exactly an alien situation though. While the Flyers enjoyed a pretty healthy regular season run, they showed in the 2010 playoffs that they can rally in the face of even multiple simultaneous injuries. In a postseason as long and physical as the NHL’s, the war of attrition will claim its share of victims. It’s up to the guys left on the ice to take it up a notch. Either Ben Holmstrom or Zac Rinaldo will be active per Lisa Hillary. The decision between the two may come down to who Ruff has in his lineup.

Similar to after game 1, the Flyers really shouldn’t need to change much after being shut out in game 4. They played pretty well, just as they had in games 3 and 4. Hopefully the Ryan Miller from those two outings will show up tonight. Miller was masterful in game 5, and there’s little a team can do when the opposing goalie is that locked in. The Flyers will try tonight though, presumably with some crease activity early.

Enjoy your Friday night and what could be a pretty wild and entertaining game. Both teams should be fired up from the start.

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

Embiid and Okafor want to play together, but not just yet, says Brown

CAMDEN, N.J. — If all goes as planned, a time will come when the Sixers can roll out a dominating frontcourt duo with Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor sharing the court in lengthy stretches.

That moment has to wait, though, as both Embiid and Okafor are on minute restrictions. As he returns from a knee injury, Okafor currently is coming off the bench and backing up Embiid.

“This conversation with Jahlil and Joel is more intelligent and applicable at a later date,” Brett Brown said at practice Friday. “When Jahlil’s minutes start going up and Joel can, then it’s a real conversation. I do think you may see them sooner than even I thought together. But as far as making it a real constant part of a strategy or rotation, it’s beyond too early days.”

In an ideal world, Brown could pair the two bigs now and use all of their allotted minutes (Embiid 20, Okafor 14) at once. That would leave an extensive workload on second-year bench player Richaun Holmes.

“This is a hot topic,” Brown said. “I will say it one more time: If I play Jahlil and Jo together, I hope Richaun can play 35 minutes.”

It’s an unrealistic expectation for Holmes, who averaged 13.8 minutes in 51 games last season. Brown caps the majority of the Sixers at six-minute segments to keep them competing at a high energy level.

“Right now, he’s a backup,” Brown said of Holmes. “I think he’s going to be an NBA player for a very long time. I just feel like in the role, he’s a second-year player that didn’t really have much of a role last year. He’s shown everybody that he’s for real. He really can play a role. At this early stage, that is the key word.”

Embiid and Okafor have been envisioning competing together since Okafor was drafted two years ago. They became friends long before they were NBA players and have an easy chemistry on the court as a result.

“I think it’s going to be exciting,” Embiid said. “We played a little bit together today in practice. We’re figuring out how to play with each other. It’s a process and we’ve got trust it.”

Yes, the players know they have to wait, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy for them to resist an opportunity to play with one another.  

“I think once we figure it out, we can really dominate together,” Okafor said. “We were able to flirt with it again today. We accidentally keep ending up on the same team even though Coach keeps telling us to make sure we alternate. But we’re having fun. We’re trying to put some pressure on it because we want to play together.”

Is that accidentally with air quotes?

“Yeah, exactly,” Okafor said with a laugh.

'Trust the process' has a different, more personal meaning to Joel Embiid

'Trust the process' has a different, more personal meaning to Joel Embiid

CAMDEN, N.J. — Joel Embiid is all about trusting the process.

He manages to insert the well-known phrase into just about every interview, hashtags it on social media and soaks in the chants during games. 

While “trust the process” is commonly associated with former Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie’s patience-required approach to building the team — which resulted in three years of dismal losing and suffering setback after setback — Embiid has his personal take on the mantra.

“I think I have my own process,” Embiid said Friday at practice.

Embiid is playing for the first time this season after waiting two years to recover from foot injuries. His long-anticipated debut was a focal point of “the process,” and his return to the court marked a new chapter in the organization.

“I went through two surgeries, lost my brother, thought about some stuff I shouldn’t have thought about, so that’s my own process,” he said. “And then the process of going through the rehab and finally getting back on the court and getting the chance to finally play in the league, that’s my process.”

Embiid is now synonymous with the word. He credits Sixers fans for the moniker, which he added to his Instagram profile. 

“I don’t think it came from me,” he said. “Fans just started and then I just went along with it.”

Wednesday marked the next step in the process, both for the Sixers and Embiid. His regular-season debut (20 points, seven rebounds, two blocks) was a long time coming and garnered buzz all over the NBA world.

“I was the third pick and then I missed two years,” Embiid said. “The excitement in the city, everybody’s happy to finally see me play. Even though it was weird because a lot of people kind of wrote me off a long time ago saying that I’d never play as a Sixer, I’d never play in the league. So it’s all fun. Everybody’s going to have an opinion.”

He’s just got to trust in his own.