Game 31Get Out the Measuring Sticks, Flyers and Bruins in a Matinee Beast-Off

Game 31Get Out the Measuring Sticks, Flyers and Bruins in a Matinee Beast-Off

Storylines and notes on Saturday's tilt between the Boston Bruins and Philadelphia Flyers at the Wells Fargo Center. Are the rebuilt Flyers ready to beat the team that blew them to pieces in May?

When I see the Flyers have a game scheduled on a Saturday, I scan to the time and hope it's either 1 PM or 3 PM (preferably 1). Not that a Saturday night game isn't a good time whether down at the Well, on the TV hanging over the bar, or at home in the living room, but particularly around the holidays, that early start just sets a good tone for the day.

Especially when it's a matchup like this one. The Bruins are in town, bringing the best record in the Northeast Division to face the top team in the Atlantic. The Flyers have gone through a lot in the past few weeks, including getting the news that they'll be without Chris Pronger for the rest of the season and playoffs. They also haven't lost in the month of December, a seven-game streak that marks their longest run since 2002.

Can they make it eight straight today against a Bruins team that hopes to have its biggest threat back in the lineup? Whole lotta notes on both teams below.

Pronger's Out, But Chara Likely to Return
A seven-game winning streak in December is plenty of fun, filling us with confidence in a team that began its season filled with question marks. But we don't have to look too far into the history books to see that a team's plight isn't decided in December. We also know that last year, the Flyers were a better team with Pronger than without. I'm not going to spend much time raining on the great parade that's currently going on, but let's just say there's a lot of hockey left on the schedule, and the Flyers are down an undeniably big piece.

The Bruins, meanwhile, appear set to have their big blueliner on patrol after a week on the shelf. Zdeno Chara hurt his knee last Saturday against the Blue Jackets, but he's been skating and should be ready to go today, reports Sean Farrell of the Boston Globe.

Blistering, Balanced Beasts Square Off
The Flyers currently lead the league in generating goals, producing at an amazing clip of 3.7 per game. Second place in that stat? The Bruins, who CSN NE's Joe Haggerty points out are actually a relatively distant second at 3.3 goals per game. However, the B's have the league's top goals against average, a paltry 2.0 allowed per game. As if last spring's postseason run left any doubt, the Bruins are an elite hockey club, blending dangerous attackers with solid defense and the best goaltending in the league.

The Flyers' own goals allowed mark is still affected by its earlier woes on defense and in goal. The back line has been improved lately, and Ilya Bryzgalov has found a groove as sweet as a Stuart Zender bass line. After a night off saw backup Sergei Bobrovsky play admirably, Bryz is back between the pipes this afternoon to face the other apple of Ed Snider's eye—Tim Thomas.

Thomas… Well let's just admit that this old bastard owns the Flyers. He's lost just three times against Philly, one of which was the 2-1 season opener, hardly his fault.

Shooting Gallery?
Mike Morreale of NHL.com dug up a good stat that shows the Bruins have been leaning on the men in the masks quite a bit, particularly this past week without Chara. Both Tuukka Rask and Thomas set season highs in saves, with Rask stopping all 41 shots he faced in a 3-0 win over the Kings and Thomas stopping 47 of 49 against the Senators the next night. The shot totals were particularly heavy late in the game, so that's something to watch for in the third period today.

Everybody Is a Star
Pronger's done. Claude Giroux is trapped in indefinite like the two-dimensional prism in Superman II. That means other guys need to continue to step up at both ends of the ice. Matt Carle is logging bigger minutes and has been on the scoresheet in four straight games, including a three-assist night in Montreal. Kimmo Timonen is playing some inspired hockey, Andrej Meszaros is fresh off pounding a point shot home, something the Flyers will need more of down the stretch with no Prongs. Coburn is his usually steady presence, and the kids are alright in Kevin Marshall and particularly Marc-Andre Bourdon.

The attack hasn't been slowed either, buoyed by young talent up and down the lines as well as steady gamesmanship from guys like Max Talbot. Just as the shipping off of Mike Richards and Jeff Carter opened a huge channel for Giroux to shine, G's own absence forces other guys to step up. Sean Couturier has been the guy positionally given that task, centering G's usual linemates. We didn't get to see much of that against the Habs though, as three minors to #14 kept him off his regular shifts throughout much of the game. If he gets another shot today, we'll be looking forward to seeing what he can do between 19 and 68.

Danny Briere is quietly having a solid season, but could be in line for another big game this week. It might not come against the Bruins, but it'll come. He's been consistently putting up points, and he'll be relied on even more now. Jake Voracek has had some great pace on the ice, another guy who might start a run soon, like fellow newcomer Wayne Simmonds has done lately.

The guy we'd most like to see step up and get dominant? James van Riemsdyk. Like Briere, he's had a quietly successful season, but he's been more quiet than successful lately with only two assists to show for his past six games. Here's hoping a matchup with the Bruins sparks him. JVR was one of the few Flyers to show up at all in the four-game sweep by Boston last spring, scoring three goals over the first two games. We haven't quite seen that JVR this season so far. Even when he was hovering around a point-per-game average, he wasn't skating with the ownership we saw in April's Buffalo series.

Measuring Sticks
Flyers fans and media have spent a lot of time wondering about the reasons Paul Holmgren blew most of the team up this past offseason. Some of it probably had to do with chemistry, a need for change within the locker room, although who knows what role that played. One of the biggest reasons Homer likely hit that reset button has nothing to do with the team in the home locker room today, and much more to do with the one getting dressed in visitors' whites. The Bruins are the NHL's benchmark, and Mr. Snider wanted a team more like theirs (he likely wasn't the only owner with that sentiment). Homer went out and got a #1 goalie, sacrificing pieces that needed to go for the cap space, among other reasons. In so doing, he netted quite a few very talented hockey players, Bryzgalov among them. While he's not quite at Thomas' level, it's time for him to show he too can dominate. What better stage for that to play out than a visit from the Bruins?

The Flyers have kept pace with the team they were rebuilt to compete with at a better level than the shitshow we saw last spring. Are they good enough to do it without their two best players?

It won't be easy, but it should be entertaining. These two teams aren't fans of each other, and both sides want to be the top dogs, even in December, and they'll need to win today to do it.

Photo: Mark L. Baer-US Presswire

Rio police charge Ryan Lochte with false report of robbery

Rio police charge Ryan Lochte with false report of robbery

RIO DE JANEIRO -- Brazilian police charged American swimmer Ryan Lochte on Thursday with filing a false robbery report over an incident during the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

A police statement said Lochte would be informed in the United States so he could decide whether to introduce a defense in Brazil.

The indictment will also be sent to the International Olympic Committee's ethics commission, the statement said.

The swimmer's publicists and his lawyer, Jeff Ostrow, did not immediately respond to calls and emails from The Associated Press seeking comment.

Lochte initially said that he and fellow swimmers Jack Conger, Gunnar Bentz and Jimmy Feigen were robbed at gunpoint in a taxi by men with a police badge as they returned to the Olympic Village from a party Aug. 15. However, security video suggested the four actually faced security guards after vandalizing a gas station restroom.

Lochte left Brazil shortly after the incident. Three days later, local authorities took Conger and Bentz off an airliner heading to the United States so they could be questioned about the robbery claim. They were later allowed to leave Brazil, as was Feigen, after he gave testimony. Feigen, who initially stood by Lochte's testimony, was not charged.

Lochte has since acknowledged that he was highly intoxicated and that his behavior led to the confrontation. It is not clear from the video whether a gun was ever pointed to the athletes.

Under Brazilian law, the penalty for falsely filing a crime report carries a maximum penalty of 18 months in prison. Lochte could be tried in absentia if he didn't return to face the charge.

The United States and Brazil have an extradition treaty dating back to the 1960s, but Brazil has a long history of not extraditing its own citizens to other nations and U.S. authorities could take the same stance if Lochte is found guilty.

That is currently the case of the head of Brazil's football confederation, Marco Polo del Nero, who faces charges in the wide-ranging scandal entangling international soccer's ruling body, FIFA. He has not travelled outside Brazil for more than a year to avoid being arrested by U.S. authorities somewhere else.

The charges in Brazil raise questions about the future for Lochte, who is planning to take time off from swimming but wants to return to compete in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. He has 12 Olympic medals, second only to Michael Phelps among U.S. male Olympians.

Lochte lost four major sponsors early this week over the controversy, including Speedo USA and Ralph Lauren. But on Thursday he picked up a new sponsor -- Pine Bros. Softish Throat Drops. Pine Bros. said people should be more understanding of the swimmer and said he will appear in ads that say the company's product is "Forgiving On Your Throat."

There aren't enough Chooch pillows for every Philadelphian

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There aren't enough Chooch pillows for every Philadelphian

Carlos Ruiz has been traded to the Dodgers and it is sad.

Not in the sense that it's a move that remotely affects anything about the current state of the Phillies. It's sad simply because Chooch -- lovable and awesome and wonderful Chooch -- is no longer a Phillie.

Chooch will be remembered for catching Roy Halladay's perfect game and no hitter and that little dribbler down the line in Game 3 of the 2008 World Series. And, of course, dropping to his knees in celebration with Brad Lidge making them World Effin Champions.

But mostly he'll just be missed. What a guy to have aroud for so long.

Roy knows how hard it is not to have him around. I guess Chase won't need his any longer since the two will be reunined with one last chance of glory in L.A.

Phillies trade Carlos Ruiz to Dodgers

Phillies trade Carlos Ruiz to Dodgers

Jimmy Rollins. Then Chase Utley. Now Carlos Ruiz.

Thursday closed another chapter of the Phillies' golden era.

Ruiz, the Phillies' catcher since 2006 and arguably the most impactful in franchise history, has been traded to the Dodgers (along with cash) for catcher A.J. Ellis, right-hander Tommy Bergjans and a player to be named later.

Rollins was dealt to the Dodgers in December 2014. Utley, still with Los Angeles, was traded to the Dodgers in August 2015.

Ryan Howard is now the lone leftover from the Phillies' 2008 world champion club.

In 11 big-league seasons — all with the Phillies — Ruiz has hit .266 with a .352 on-base percentage and has been lauded for his game-calling abilities. This season, the 37-year-old is batting .261 with a .368 OBP, three home runs and 12 RBIs in a reserve role. Ruiz joined the Phillies' organization in 1998 when the team signed him as an amateur free agent. In 2016, he was playing out his final season in red pinstripes, the final year of a three-year, $26 million deal.

"I met Chooch in 2009 for the first time and immediately sensed that he was a special player," Phillies manager Pete Mackanin said. "But more importantly, over the years I grew to know that he is a special person. I'll miss him."

Ruiz has caught the fourth-most games in Phillies history with 1,029, behind only Mike Lieberthal (1,139), Red Dooin (1,124) and Bob Boone (1,094).

"Carlos not only was — and is — a good teammate, he [also] learned how to become the leader he needed to be behind the plate running a pitching staff," former Phillies pitcher Jamie Moyer said. "As a teammate, he always had that Ruiz smile that we all have come to love!"

Ruiz caught Cole Hamels' no-hitter in July of last season, marking the catcher's fourth no-no behind the plate, tying him for most in MLB history with Jason Varitek.

"He’s a tremendous catcher and it just shows," Hamels said after no-hitting the Cubs at Wrigley Field on July 25. "If he wasn’t, he wouldn’t be catching this many no-hitter, perfect games. All of us have been fortunate enough to have him."

The Panama native, beloved and known by the Delaware Valley as "Chooch," quickly became a fan favorite. He was the staple behind home plate of the team's five-year run from 2007-11, in which it won five National League East titles, two NL pennants and, of course, the World Series championship in 2008.

"They are my favorite fans in the world," Ruiz said in February, "and we have some good memories together."

And many of them.