Groundhog Day: Flyers Survive Another Early Hole, Bryz Awesome, G Scores, Danny Doesn't

Groundhog Day: Flyers Survive Another Early Hole, Bryz Awesome, G Scores, Danny Doesn't

Strike up the music, the band has begun… the Philadelphia Polka. The Flyers conceded an early goal, yet tied it up and eventually won. 
They've now allowed the first goal in 15 of their last 20 games and led during the first 10 minutes only twice in the last 47 games while trailing 20 times (per the broadcast team). 
In this case, the early goal was just 26 seconds in, and the game-winner came in the shootout. Ilya Bryzgalov handled just about everything in between while Peter Laviolette attempted some line-juggling to jumpstart a dormant offense, and the Flyers left the ice with a 2-1 shootout win over the Washington Capitals. 
Claude Giroux was at times double-shifted in regulation and overtime, and his 27th goal of the season was another dazzler. It's bound to en-ter-tain ya… 
A look at G's jaw-dropper and more, below. 
Of course it's frustrating to see the Flyers allow a goal early again, and their lack of offense is puzzling. But, they don't appear to be overwhelmed by what isn't working for them. Bryz is keeping them in games, and even the shootout isn't posing the automatic-loss issues it once did. Even when the goals aren't coming, there's no quit in them. Wasn't long ago the team wearing this crest often had the opposite problem. 
Alex Ovechkin netted the Caps goal before the beer lines had thinned out. Bryz blockered a puck to the corner, and his defense lost the battle for it there, and when it came back to his crease. When the puck came back to the crease, Bryz tried to poke it away under pressure, but it went right to Ovechkin, who buried it. 
The Caps had the better end of some see-saw action throughout portions of the first, but the Flyers were also strong, particularly later in the frame. It wasn't the most exciting game overall, and right around the time I started wondering if there'd be any excitement in this one, the Flyers found their equalizer. 
Jaromir Jagr sent a sweet outlet pass to Giroux, who turned Dennis Wideman inside out, then got Caps goalie Braden Holtby to bite early. 
Only time all night that Holtby looked lost. He was stellar throughout, beaten only once before the shootout. But man, just look at this:
So G'd. 
Bryzgalov would ultimately outduel Holtby, stopping Marcus Johansson on a penalty shot and getting beat only once in the shootout. (And boy did Matt Hendricks beat him then.)
Conventional dekes were no match for Holtby in the shootout, with both Giroux and Danny Briere stoned on their moves. But Matt Read opened the affair with a quick shot as he glided up the slot, and Wayne Simmonds did the same to beat Holtby with the game-winner. 
Bryz then stopped Troy Brouwer and raised his hands to the rafters. Great to see that rather than another reverse snow-angel like after the Hendricks goal. 
All of a sudden, early holes and shootouts aren't so scary. But, we'd be just as happy not seeing another of either the rest of the way. Wayne Train? Wayne Train.
POSTGAME FUNBryzgalov once again had no interest in talking to the assembled media. He alternated cliché-quotes with refusals and shushings, and if that's in any way helping his comfort level, there isn't a hockey fan in the Tri-State Area who would have it any other way. If he doesn't want to talk after wins or answer questions about his game, we'll survive. Also, reporters keep asking about his confidence, a buzz word that silences him night after night (yet, the question keeps coming despite the response it elicits and the fact that he's clearly been confident over the past month). 
Meanwhile, Jagr again joked that the Flyers should start Sergei Bobrovsky and then bring in Bryz after the first shot. Joked being the key word, of course. Note: Jagr is not opposed to laughing at his own material. 

NOTESGiroux's goal gave him 85 points on the season—good for both second in the NHL and also the highest total for a Flyer since Mark Recchi put up 91 in 1999-2000. 
Bryz's stop on the penalty shot didn't appear to involve contact with the puck. Marcus Johansson lost control of it as he went for the shot, and Bryz's poke attempt upended him. Photographer Eric Hartline knows what I'm talkin about:+ Physics =

Sean Couturier's line(s) effectively silenced Washington's top line after that opening shift. 
The trio of Schenn, Briere, and Simmonds didn't find the scoresheet, but they worked as hard a line can throughout. 48 and 17 will get theirs soon. Right?
Kinda mind-blowing that Ned Ryerson from Groundhog Day is the well-endowed movie producer on the current season of Californication. Which is awful, btw. 
For about 7 of the last 10 minutes of regulation, the Caps were held without a shot on goal. In overtime, the puck was rarely out of their zone. Amazing this game ended 1-1. 
Why did it? The Flyers failed to get quality shots in many cases, either opting for the extra pass, firing wide, or being effectively kept outside of dangerous angles. They seemed stagnant as the Caps gave them the edges but put sticks on them as they turned toward the goal. The vertical attack is lacking right now. 
Peter Forsberg was in the house! (See below)
HIGHLIGHTS

All photos by the great Eric Hartline, US Presswire.

Sixers beat Pelicans without Joel Embiid leading the way

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USA Today Images

Sixers beat Pelicans without Joel Embiid leading the way

BOX SCORE

NEW ORLEANS -- Joel Embiid shot just 5 for 15 from the field and the Sixers … wait … the Sixers won. 

Surprising? Actually, that’s just how the Sixers envision finding success.

It’s not about Embiid having a relatively quiet night on offense with 14 points, especially going 0 for 5 from three. It’s about other players getting involved and taking the burden off the rookie. Embiid has proved he can do a lot of things, but carrying a team each night in his first season isn’t what the Sixers have in mind. 

“I think that’s when we’re at our best,” Nik Stauskas said after the Sixers beat the Pelicans 99-88 (see Instant Replay). “Obviously there are a few guys in the NBA like a LeBron (James), KD (Kevin Durant) or Steph (Curry) that can single-handedly win a game throughout the entire season. But most of the teams are going to rely on bench players to step up and make shots and make plays. I think that’s when we’re most effective.”

Embiid entered Thursday night averaging 24.3 points and shooting 48.9 percent in Sixers wins (three games played). His 14 points against the Pelicans were his fewest in a victory this season. He also grabbed seven boards with four blocks and three steals as the team snapped an overall eight-game losing skid and an 23-game road losing streak. 

Instead of being powered offensively by their centerpiece, the Sixers received solid efforts from the starters and reserves. Ersan Ilyasova scored 23 points (along with eight rebounds) for the second straight game. Sergio Rodriguez chipped in 16 points and eight assists. Off the bench,  Stauskas hit three treys en route to 14 points while Dario Saric scored 10 points with five rebounds. 

Embiid’s teammates attribute their success to the fact he is such a focal point of the opponents’ defense. In comparison to the beginning of the season when Embiid was getting stifled by double-teams, he has been learning how to pass out of them. Embiid expects to see two defenders every game and has been making adjustments to create opportunities for others to shoot rather than committing turnovers. 

“We’re not standing around a lot and just focusing on what Jo can do,” Robert Covington said. “Jo is making great moves to find guys that are open. He’s willing to pass. We’re starting to build the chemistry that everyone’s been looking for.”

Ilyasova has noticed a change in the flow of the offense and has capitalized on defensive mismatches when opponents swarm Embiid. 

“We just share the ball well,” Ilyasova said. “I find myself open. Obviously Joel does a great job of as far as when there is a double-team, just kicking out. When I see the open look, I try to knock that shot down.” 

This style of play is mutually beneficial for both Embiid and his teammates. Just because Embiid is passing out doesn't mean he's not getting his looks. Oftentimes, dishing out of a double-team allows him to get a better look on the next touch. 

“It’s a team effort," Covington said. "We’re doing so much as a unit that we’re not just focusing on just get Jo the ball and let him do his thing. He’s getting the ball, he’s surveying the floor and then he’s making his moves. He’s reading the defense really well. He’s doing a lot of [kicking out]. Then we find him a lot of re-posts and finding the open shot and making it easy for him to find the easy bucket.” 

Embiid is capable of scoring 20-plus in spite of his 28-minute restriction. The Sixers are making strides, though, by finding ways to win when he isn’t the running up the scoreboard. 

“I think there’s no doubt Jo is our best player and our offense is going to revolve around him most of the time,” Stauskas said. “But we’re playing our best when he’s posting up and kicking out to guys and they’re hitting threes or we’re taking pressure off him by making plays and the defense can’t just be solely focused on him. In a game like tonight, that’s kind of what you saw.”

Connor McDavid: Brandon Manning made 'classless' comments about injury

Connor McDavid: Brandon Manning made 'classless' comments about injury

Connor McDavid scored his first power-play goal of the season in the second period during the Flyers' 6-5 win on Thursday night (see Instant Replay). After his 12th goal of the year, McDavid made a point to stare down and exchange words with Flyers defenseman Brandon Manning.

In the first period, Manning and McDavid were in the middle of a scrum after the whistle, chirping each other (see 10 observations). The battle between the two roots back to when Manning broke the rising superstar’s collarbone November 2015 during a play against the boards in Edmonton.

“You know what, I did all I could defending him last year in the media," McDavid said after Thursday's game. "I didn’t want to make a big deal saying he did it on purpose.

"He wanted to make some comments today about what went on last year and I thought it was one of the classless things I’ve ever seen on the ice. He said some things and our guys responded accordingly.

"We can put the whole 'he did it on purpose' thing to rest, because what he said out there confirmed that. It shows what kind of guy he is, how he doesn’t step up and fight some of our guys.”

Manning received death threats from Edmonton fans last season, and responded after the game Thursday, reiterating the play that injured McDavid was an accident.

"I think anybody who knows me or who has played with or against me along the road here," Manning said, "knows that I am not that kind of player. I am not out there intentionally trying to hurt people. I'm a guy who plays the game hard and I take pride in that.

"I think going back to last year, it was a total accident. I mean, there were three players involved and there was never any intention of hurting anyone."

The injury ended up costing McDavid a few months, and a year later, the tension is still high between him and Manning.

As the second period moved along, McDavid continued to make plays for the Oilers. At the 4:35 mark in the second period, he took the puck away from the Flyers and then helped set up Andrej Sekera for a shorthanded goal that tied the game, 3-3.

The shorthanded goal helped give the Oilers momentum at the end of the period, but they could not carry it over to the third. The loss Thursday is the second night in a row in which Edmonton lost a game it looked like it was going to win.

“I’m not too sure what it is but I think we will figure it out,” McDavid said. "I’m not too sure what it is, like I said before. Something we need to figure out real fast here.”