Here We Go Again: NHL Lockout Underway

Here We Go Again: NHL Lockout Underway

Training camps were set to open in a mere six days, while opening night in arenas across North America is scheduled for less than one month from now. But on Sunday at midnight, the National Hockey League officially locked out its players for the third time in two decades, putting all future dates on ice indefinitely.

Whether you're an avid fan who has been following along, or the wake-me-in-January type casually keeping abreast of the developments, news of a lockout coming into effect is nothing earth-shattering. One need only look at recent history to suspect labor strife is always right around the corner in the NHL, and overtures toward this latest work stoppage have been a year in the making.

As for what it's all about, Sarah Baicker breaks down the meaningful issues better than I can. If I were being succinct and forward though, I would argue it boils down to the owners crapping on the players rather than attempt to resolve the real issues a handful of franchises are having maintaining profitability.

All this, unfortunately, at a time when by seemingly any measure the sport has achieved record popularity in the States. It's bad enough longtime fans constantly are put on the back burner because the league "knows" they will come back. However, they risk disenfranchising new fans, thus potentially cutting into the league's growth with this latest stunt.

What happens next is anybody's guess. For the season to start on time -- unlikely given how far apart the league and the union are said to be -- you would think camps need to open on time or without much delay, which means there is still a week or so to figure things out. Most observers feel the entire season will not be lost as a result, so there's that at least.

As far as the Flyers go, not much to be said for their part. As Menta reported for CSN, Brayden Schenn and Sean Couturier were optioned to the Phantoms in advance of the lockout. It remains to be seen whether any of Philly's players will look to Europe for work. At this point, most probably are not yet certain what the next step is.

Not much left to add, other than it's a damn shame. Labor disputes are a fact of life in the real world, increasingly so it feels in all walks of life. We saw it with the NBA and NFL over the past year and a half, and football still has their officials watching the games on TV with the rest of us.

It's a little different with the NHL though, because it's constant, and they just lost an entire season like yesterday or something. Not to mention it's hard to sympathize with a bunch of wealthy owners when their front offices are running around offering 100-million-dollar contracts as if they are Arby's coupons.

You're smart businessmen. Figure it out. Spare the rest of us.

Gregg Popovich on Sixers: 'One of my joys in life to watch them win'

Gregg Popovich on Sixers: 'One of my joys in life to watch them win'

When Brett Brown agreed to become the Sixers' head coach, he knew he was embarking upon a unique challenge with a franchise that planned to be as methodical as possible in its rebuild. 

One of the results was a career record for Brown of 47-199 entering this season, a record so lopsidedly poor that Brown may never break the .500 mark.

But the Sixers are finally showing real progress, with a star in Joel Embiid and young players who are turning out to be useful pieces. The Sixers have won seven of their last nine, and there's no one happier to see that than Brown's former boss and mentor, Gregg Popovich.

"It's one of my joys in life to watch them win basketball games because if there's any team that deserves it, it's those guys," Popovich told ESPN.

Brown and the Sixers aren't out of the woods yet. At 14-26, they're still closer to the bottom of the Eastern Conference, but the entire vibe around the team has changed. 

"They've had it really tough for all the obvious reasons," said Popovich, who has been the Spurs' head coach since 1996 and worked with Brown from 2002-13.

"There's nobody in our business that is more positive, and more day-to-day upbeat and ready to teach and love than Brett Brown. He's a unique, unique guy."

Clay Buchholz was introduced to his wife by Donald Trump, is big fan of 45

Clay Buchholz was introduced to his wife by Donald Trump, is big fan of 45

Philadelphia Phillies fans likely don't know a ton about one of the team's most recent pitching acquisitions, former Red Sox right-hander Clay Buccholz, but it turns out he has a unique connection to the 45th President of the United States of America.

It was Donald Trump who first introduced him to his now wife, Lindsay Clubine, at an after party of a UFC fight following a game out in California back in the late aughts.

The Boston Globe wrote about the encounter early last year.

“It was ‘Affliction: Banned’ fighting, and [Trump] owned the whole circuit," Buchholz told the Globe. "My wife knew him prior, from ‘Deal or No Deal’ when he came on the show as a celebrity banker."

“She was helping him host this event in Anaheim. So when we all walked in, he was there, and he saw us and he introduced Lindsey to me.”

Trump, of course, also has ties to a more formative New England athlete in Tom Brady who allegedly called Donald on Thursday to congratulate him on his coming inauguration. 

As for Buchholz opinion on Trump? He was a big supporter during the campaign and is a fan of the former " The Apprentice" host.

“He says what a lot of people think and don’t say,” Buchholz told the Globe. “I like that part of him."

Phillies fans tend to say what they think, so he'll probably be a fan of them as well, right?

Here are some shots of the couple from their social media accounts: