How Much Does Danny Briere Have Left in the Tank?

How Much Does Danny Briere Have Left in the Tank?

Danny Briere has been the subject of trade rumors for thepast month, which I suppose in a way is actually a good thing for the two-timeAll Star. Theyve taken some of the focus off the fact that hes having hisworst season in the NHL since he was 21 years old.

Not that people havent taken notice of Brieres lack ofproduction, were just not sure everybody has taken stock of how bad it is. Hehas five goals and eight assists while supposedly centering the Flyers secondline, and even for a guy whos posted a career minus, a -13 through 26 games isugly in fact only five players have a worse ratio.

Perhaps most troubling of all is the shot percentage. Brierehas made 14.5 of the shots hes taken in his career, but this year that numberhas been slashed in half, down to a meager 7.2. That would easily set a newpersonal low.

Plus, now hes out indefinitely with a concussion, yetanother impediment to making a trade even if the Flyers could. Briere of coursehas the no-movement clause in his contract, so theres a chance he wasnt goinganywhere regardless, but not too many teams are going to be interested in aninjured player whos had virtually no impact this season.

At this point, the real question is whether or not Brierecan snap out of it. How much of his struggles are due to age and naturaldecline, and how much can be attributed to issues that can be fixed and smallsample size?

Sample size is something were going to be looking at for along time with relation to this season. You can extrapolate the numbers over afull 82 games, but a normal season has ebbs and flows. Briere could return tothe ice, get hot, and suddenly this discussion becomes moot.

Its also worth noting that the Flyers frustrations rundeeper than Briere, so its not necessarily equitable to single out one person.

And if were being fair about this, how much has the wristinjury he suffered while playing in Germany during the lockout affected hisshot? One week doctors are telling him not to take slap shots at practice, thenext week Briere is back in the lineup. Its certainly something that could betaking its toll even if Briere wouldnt necessarily admit it himself.

But then the writing was on the wall last year already. His16 goals and 33 assists were his fewest over a full season since 2002-03 whenhe was traded from Phoenix to Buffalo, and his 9.2 shot percentage was wellbelow normal, lowest since 98-99 actually.

Briere is 35. Its only natural for his ability to startfalling off.

Yet somehow he still turns it on during the playoffs. Brierescored eight goals in 11 postseason games last year, potting an incredible30.8 of his shots. Clutch performances are nothing new to Briere, but it wouldseem to fly directly in the face of an athlete-in-decline storyline.

Assuming Briere is still in Philadelphia after the tradedeadline passes on April 3, which is pretty much a given at this point, theorganization is going to have a tough decision to make in the offseason. He hastwo more years on his contract at 6.5 million against the cap money theFlyers could desperately use and regardless of whether he can bounce back, Breiresbest days are obviously behind him.

If hes not amenable to a trade, amnestying the contract is always on the table. One way or the other though, it might be time for the Flyers to consider moving on from Danny Briere.

Agholor, Huff and Green-Beckham avoiding Eagles' trade rumors

Agholor, Huff and Green-Beckham avoiding Eagles' trade rumors

While head coach Doug Pederson denied reports the Eagles have inquired about the availability of veteran wide receivers Wednesday (see story), it's fair to wonder how those rumors affect the psyche of the guys who are already here. True or not, there's a reason why stories about trades are believable.

The Eagles' current crop of receivers hasn't been very impactful, particularly Nelson Agholor, Josh Huff and Dorial Green-Beckham. Yet despite disappointing numbers, constant questions about their lack of production and now rumblings somebody like Torrey Smith or Alshon Jeffery could be coming to take their jobs, the young trio doesn't sound too worried.

"We all have a job to do here, and if you're worried about somebody else, you're going to lose sight of your own job," Agholor said. "Just like anybody else in any workplace, you need to focus on yourself and execute your job."

"That has nothing to do with me," Huff said. "As long as I'm confident in the way I do my job, everything else will speak for itself."

"It's something I'm completely not worried out," Green-Beckham added. "I'm really just focusing on myself and whatever happens, happens."

Not only do the Eagles' wideouts sound genuinely unconcerned by trade rumors, they almost seem to welcome the competition.

"It motivates you, especially if you're still around," Agholor said. "Or if you get sent somewhere else, you understand that you have to wake up. You have to wake up and you have to make plays."

"I'm a competitor," Huff said. "I'm not going to say no to a competition, but if they do want a veteran receiver, so be it. It doesn't bother us."

It's certainly the right attitude to have, maybe even the only one. Still, trade rumors — whether rumors are all they are or not — is a clear indictment of this group's performance this season.

Jordan Matthews has been OK, but far from a prolific No. 1 receiver who makes up for a lack of complementary weapons. The third-year player is currently on pace to finish 2016 with 67 receptions for 944 yards and five touchdowns, all of which would be down from his previous season's totals.

Agholor is second on the team with 18 receptions for 191 yards, Huff has 12 catches for 63 yards and Green-Beckham has 13 for 139. All three have found the end zone once as well.

What's troubling about those numbers is that not only the lack of production, but the lack of plays they've made down the field. Agholor and Green-Beckham are both under less than 11 yards per reception, while Huff is averaging a paltry 5.3.

It's no wonder the Eagles' front office would show interest in deep threats like Smith and Jeffery, both of whom are proven capable of stretching the field.

"I just work every day and try to get separation to the best of my ability," Agholor said. "I have a great receivers coach that tries to help me with my releases and fine tune that, but the most important thing I feel like with creating separation is a mindset, because this is a league, where it's good on good every day."

"It's just what the coaches see, what the coaches want from us," Huff said. "Obviously, would I want to get the ball downfield? Yes. Has it gone that way? No, but my job is to continue to get better each and every day, and once my number is called, I'll be ready to make that play."

Pederson, who earlier denied the Eagles were looking into trades, defended the big-play ability of his wideouts.

"Nelson can stretch it," Pederson said. "Josh can stretch it. But I think it's protection and design of the play. When I think of stretching the field, I mean, a guy can run fast and that can be stretching the field, but who can really take the top off?

"Those two guys are two that can do that."

Agholor, the Eagles' first-round pick in 2015, has faced these kinds of questions since his underwhelming rookie season. He's getting used to people doubting his ability, but that's not stopping him from keeping a positive attitude.

"I think the most important thing is to progress each day, and have a next-play mentality too," Agholor said. "Some of the greatest players in this league, they drop balls, I'm sure guys have probably jammed them before, however it goes, but the best thing they can do is just bounce back, line up again and win the next matchup.

"I want to continue to have that mindset and allow it to speak for itself so I don't have to sit here and tell. If every time you're all asking me that, it must mean you all don't see that."

Green-Beckham has a little bit more of a unique perspective on this matter than Agholor and Huff. While the second-year receiver is staying positive and motivated as well, he's been on the other end of these rumors and was ultimately traded from the Titans to the Eagles back in August.

Because he's only been with the team for a couple of months, Green-Beckham didn't seem too worried he's running out of opportunities with the Eagles.

"I just got here, so I don't think I'm going to end up leaving when I just got here," Green-Beckham said. "For some guys, you really have to worry about that, and you just have to focus on trying to compete, trying to get better and better each and every day and doing the little things."

Green-Beckham also knows better than anyone how such a trade would increase expectations on the players already inside the locker room, and he had a message for his teammates.

"I just know how it feels for guys who come in as traded, and for guys who've been here, you just have to understand you're going to have to compete when stuff like that happens," Green-Beckham said. "It makes your job a lot hard, but you just have to focus more.

"It's a business. Like they say, the NFL stands for not for long, so you always have that in your thoughts, and know every opportunity, you have to take advantage of it."

Joel Embiid the gold standard by wearing gold shoes to NBA debut

Joel Embiid the gold standard by wearing gold shoes to NBA debut

For the better part of two years, most of Sixers fans' worries focused on Joel Embiid's foot.

Before his first NBA game on Tuesday night against the Thunder, Embiid made sure his very large feet were still the center of attention.

Embiid walked into the Wells Fargo Center sporting a flashy pair of gold shoes.

Hopefully he has a pair of matching basketball sneakers for tonight's game.

Also, this is cool: