LeBrun Links Flyers to Bobby Ryan on Eve of Draft

LeBrun Links Flyers to Bobby Ryan on Eve of Draft

Philadelphia Flyers fans have clamored for the acquisition of Cherry Hill's Bobby Ryan since oh I don't know, his conception? Thursday afternoon, on the eve of the NHL Entry Draft, ESPN's Pierre LeBrun reported that the Flyers are themselves interested in Ryan. It's not the first time we've heard it, but it's worth considering even if it's somewhat unlikely. 
Of course, the Flyers are linked to a handful of big-name players at every major player movement date, and Ryan is just one of a few mentioned in connection to Philadelphia this off-season. Most attention to date has been focused on a pair of defensemen from Nashville, a certain Mr. Nash out of Columbus, and Zach Parise. Each of those four players also have stories attached as to why they are unlikely at best to dress in Orange & Black next season. 
But what about Ryan? 
Nash is expensive, both in terms of his huge cap hit/contract duration and what Blue Jackets GM Scott Howson will likely require to deal him. Parise will be the most sought after forward in the free agent market by a large margin, and there's been a report that he's unlikely to choose a Devils rival. Will the difficult in acquiring one of those two drive up the Ryan market? If so, what would he cost?
The challenge that comes with having high-ceiling young players like Brayden Schenn and Sean Couturier on your roster this time of year is that any trade partner is going to start negotiations by naming one of them. In this case, LeBrun has a source saying any deal for Ryan would need to center around Schenn going the other way. 
Coming to Philadelphia along with Wayne Simmonds in exchange for future Stanley Cup Champion Mike Richards, Schenn is a player the Flyers would and should be intensely reluctant to deal. He came over complete with the billing of the best prospect not currently in the NHL, and the Flyers have him locked up for at least the next two seasons, during which he could develop out of potential stud mode into total-stud-right-now mode. 
Ryan's no slouch either, topping 30 goals in his four full seasons (the first being only 64 games). The second overall pick in 2005 checks in at 6'2, 200+, with a cap hit just north of $5M through 2014-2015. 
It's no secret that the Flyers would likely prefer to trade James van Riemsdyk, whose name has fueled most trade rumors lately. But, how likely is it that the Ducks are interested in swapping their big winger from Jersey for another one who has lower production and more injury questions? 
Although the speculation winds seem to be at JVR's back, it's not exactly the ideal time to trade him. Coming off an injury-shortened season and sitting in rehab vs. surgery limbo, it's hard to imagine the Flyers getting full value for the former 2nd overall pick. Just last year, JVR was deemed worthy of a sizable extension. This off-season, perhaps this weekend, the Flyers need to decide whether he's still worth that deal, or they need to convince someone else he is.
In short, if there's any meat on this rumor bone, it would take more cargo being loaded onto the flight to California than JVR. The Flyers' 20th overall is a start, but it'd likely require another rostered player such as a mid-pairing defenseman and/or one of the young forwards not named Schenn or Couturier. Can they afford to give up that kind of defenseman, particularly with Matt Carle ready to test free agency? 
In all of the discussion focusing on Nash, Parise, and Ryan, there is the reality that scoring was not the Flyers' biggest issue, not by a long shot. But with no easy answers on the blue line and the goaltending situation locked in place, it appears Paul Holmgren is in pursuit of another lamp-lighter. If Jaromir Jagr leaves and/or JVR is traded, there will be some opportunities for other forwards to get more minutes. But, also the opportunity for the GM to fill the void with a more proven acquisition. 
There's good reason to assume LeBrun is right that the Flyers are interested in Ryan. The hard part is figuring out a deal that would land him without hobbling the current roster. 
This all might be too deep a look into a simple "Rumblings" report, but with temperatures in the 90s, why not chat some hockey? After last year's draft dealings, nothing can be easily dismissed.
Check out LeBrun's piece for more Flyers discussion points, including St. Louis' interest in Carle and why money won't be the factor that determines whether Jagr is back in Philly next season. 
Stay tuned as things could get interesting ahead of tonight's draft in Pittsburgh… 

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout wins Eagles-Cowboys bet forcing friend to look ridiculous

Mike Trout sure does win a lot when the Eagless beat the Cowboys.

Not only did the Los Angeles Angels outfielder get a touchdown ball from Carson Wentz during the Eagles win over the Cowboys to cap off the season, but he also won a bet on the game with a friend.

Turns out, Wentz had some sort of bet with DJ Cottrell, whose Twitter profile says he is from Trout's hometown of Millville, NJ. Cottrell is likely a Cowboys fan and came up on the losing end.

"The fact I have to wear an entire Eagles uniform to the gym for a week is going to be the death of me," he Tweeted on Tuesday.

Then he posted a photo of himself in the ridiculous football uniform while posing alongside Trout.

It's good to be Mike Trout. Not so much a Dallas Cowboys fan these days.

[via Cut4]

 

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

Eagles to receive just under $8 million in salary cap carryover for 2017

The Eagles are getting salary cap help. Just not quite as much as they expected.  

The NFL Players Association announced the official 2017 salary-cap carryover figures on Wednesday, and the Eagles will receive $7,933,869 in extra cap space this coming year on top of the unadjusted salary cap figure that every team begins the offseason with.

The NFL’s official 2017 salary cap figure hasn’t yet been announced, but it’s expected to be somewhere in the $166 to $170 million range, up from a record-$155.3 million in 2016.

Under terms of the CBA, teams can receive credit in each year’s salary cap for cap space that went unused the previous season. This creates an adjusted cap figure that can vary by tens of millions of dollars per team.

The Eagles under former team president Joe Banner were the first to use this once-obscure technique in the late 1990s. Today, every team uses it to some extent.

The more carryover money a team gets, the more it has to spend relative to the combined cap figures of players under contract the coming year.

The NFLPA originally estimated in the fall that the Eagles would receive $8.25 million in carryover money, so the new figure is about $316,000 less than originally expected.

It’s also the ninth-highest of the 32 teams, although below the average of $9.18 million. That’s because the top few carryover figures are so much ridiculously higher than the average (Browns $50.1 million, 49ers $38.7 million, Titans $24.0 million).

According to salary cap data tracker Spotrac, the Eagles have 52 players under contract for 2017 with a total combined cap figure of $158,040,710.

With an $168 million unadjusted cap, the Eagles would have an adjusted cap figure of $175,933,869.

They have $7,055,933 in dead money, mainly from trading Sam Bradford ($5.5 million) and Eric Rowe ($904,496) but also from departed players such as Andrew Gardner ($250,000), Josh Huff ($138,986) and Blake Countess ($98,678).

Subtract the 2017 contract obligations – the $158,040,710 figure – along with the dead money – the $7,055,033 figure – and that leaves the Eagles with roughly $10.84 million in cap space.

That figure may not include some 2016 bonuses that have not yet been made public. And it doesn’t include, for example, a $500,000 pay raise Peters got by triggering a contract escalator.

So that reduces the $10.84 million figure to $10.34 million.

From there, about $4 ½ million or so will go to the 2017 rookie pool.

So that leaves the Eagles currently with somewhere in the ballpark of $6 million in cap space.

Now, the Eagles will obviously be able to increase that number by releasing players.

They would more than double their cap space just by releasing Connor Barwin, who has a $8.35 million cap number but would cost only $600,000 in dead money for a cap savings of $7.75 million.

Jason Peters ($9.2 million), Jason Kelce ($3.8 million), Ryan Mathews ($4 million), Leodis McKelvin ($3.2 million) and Mychal Kendricks ($1.8 million) would also clear large amounts of cap space.

So for example by releasing Barwin, Kelce, McKelvin and Mathews, they would increase their cap space by a whopping $18.75 million. 

Of course, then the Eagles have to think about replacing those players with cheaper versions while still trying to build a playoff roster.

Whatever happens, the Eagles are in a unique position as they enter the 2017 offseason, with far less cap flexibility than other years.

“Yeah, it's unusual, certainly since I've been here, to have a more challenging situation,” vice president of football operations Howie Roseman said earlier this month.

“But part of our job in the front office is to look at this over a long period of time. So as we sit here today, it isn't like the first time that we are looking at that situation, and we'll do whatever's best for the football team.”