Will Pronger Be Ready? D-Man's Health Still Among Flyers' Big Questions

Will Pronger Be Ready? D-Man's Health Still Among Flyers' Big Questions

Amidst a whirlwind Flyers off-season that has seen significant roster turnover, Chris Pronger's health may still be the most significant question facing the team heading into the 2011-2012 season.

A week or so after The Trades went down, I was looking at the current Flyers roster, trying to get an idea of what the team might look like come October and throughout the season. With the known quantities having left town in Mike Richards and Jeff Carter, along with Ville Leino, Kris Versteeg, Brian Boucher, Dan Carcillo, and Nikolay Zherdev, we have a lot to learn about the guys who will replace them on the ice and in the locker room.

Can Jakub Voracek and Wayne Simmonds build on their successes in Columbus and LA, respectively, and bring their games to a higher level in Philly?

How long will it take Brayden Schenn to emerge as the star (or at least 'very good player') he projects to be?

Will Ilya Bryzgalov provide elite goaltending the likes of which we haven't seen since Bernie Parent (which is to say, for many of us, never seen)?

Does Jaromir Jagr have any dominance left in the tank?

Will the Briere line continue to be successful without Leino?

How much Lappy does Maxim Talbot have in him?

Can a strong defense improve on last year's play and be more consistent?

A big part of that last question is the health of Chris Pronger, whose 2010-2011 season and playoffs were disrupted by a series of injuries with long recovery periods. Coming out of the playoff loss to the eventual Stanley Cup Champion Boston Bruins, before we (or at least I) had any speck of an idea that Richards and Carter might be traded, we knew that Pronger's recovery from injuries and surgery would be a big question mark at the start of the next season. After all of the above questions made headlines for the better part of a month, the Pronger Question still looms large.

I've already written on that topic in my post-mortem on the Flyers' ridiculously disappointing, premature death in the playoffs. Feel free to read on that here (it's right after I say I don't see the Richards-Laviolette problem being a big deal, and that Richie isn't question for me heading into the off-season…).

Yesterday, Pronger provided his second media availability of the off-season, checking in on a conference call with the local hockey bards. I've pasted the transcript of that call below, along with my thoughts on a few of the responses (in italics).

Q: How are you feeling and what’s going on?

“I’m doing ok. I am starting to feel a little bit better and do a little bit more in the gym. I was cleared to start riding the bike a little bit harder, but have yet to be cleared to start lifting weights though.”
 
Q: What is a daily routine like for you now compared to what it should be like?
 
“I usually get into the gym and walk on the treadmill for 10 minutes and then I ride the bike for anywhere between 30 to 40 minutes, and have over the last couple weeks slowly started to increase the wattage or tension on the bike, and I am starting to get up there. I get a pretty good sweat now and my heart rate gets up there so I am starting to get fairly close to where I would probably ride at. I have yet to begin doing sprint work or anything like that.  From there I go into some core work for probably another 30 minutes, and work on my back and my core and everything I need to do to tighten up to work on my back rehab.  And then depending on the day I’ll go do legs or I’ll do some light shoulder work. ”

So, while still a ways away from being able to put in a full workout, Pronger is doing significantly more cardio than I am.
 
Q: What concerns you the most right now, where you have to be in terms of training camp?
 
“Well, that would be strength. I haven’t lifted a weight in the last six months, so that would be the answer to your question of what haven’t I done, well, obviously lift weights. Strength, for my position and the way I play, is critical. So I’ve got to gain my strength back before I begin skating.”

Starting to get into the concerning stuff here. Pronger's as tough as they come, combining size with brute force. He's not going to lose his frame any time soon, but he's not going to be punishing anyone until his muscle is in order, and there's no telling when exactly that will be. The good news here is, as usual, Pronger is being candid and apparently pretty honest with himself about his progress and where he needs to be. It's about his health, and his own expectations. He doesn't seem to be fooling himself or trying to fool the rest of us by indicating any of this will be easy. He has a stepwise set of tasks in place before reaching his goal of being back to normal, rather than just racing toward normalcy, which can result in setbacks.
 
Q: The team made a lot of moves in the off-season, obviously, and you lost a lot of goals. What is your feeling on the makeover? Do you like the moves that were made?
 

“I think the biggest thing, [when] you look at offensive production and things of that nature, I think you need to look at projections and where guys are going to take their game with increased ice time, increased power play time, things of that nature. Obviously, with the addition of [Jaromir] Jagr, you’re hopefully going to get 50 or 60 points out of him.  [Claude Giroux], who knows where he takes his game to.  [James van Riemsdyk] scratched the surface last year in the playoffs and hopefully he comes back and is able to take his game to the next level. Wayne Simmonds can come in and provide 15 or 20 goals on the wing.  [Jakub] Voracek coming in, he should be able to supply some offense. We lose a lot in [Michael Richards] and [Jeff Carter] and [Ville Leino] but I think you gain some of that back through the improved play and increased ice time, power play and what not for those other guys I mentioned. And then really the style of play. We don’t want to be in shootouts.  We don’t want to play in games that are 8-7.  We want to be able to rely on our goaltender and our defense, which is where we’re built, and our youth up front, get skating, get physical, get in on the play and create turnovers and things of that nature.”

A realistic and comfortingly optimistic assessment of what the Flyers are facing in turning over their lineup. They lose some sure things, but gain some pieces that may help them play more within their system. The point total for Jagr is obviously interesting and indicates a confidence that Jags can still play at a high level. With 50-60 points, he'd have been in the Leino range (53) last season, and not far behind Carter and Richards (66 each)—for $3.3 million. Whether Jagr will actually tally that many obviously remains to be seen, but we'll gladly take it if so. Also implied here is a confidence in the goaltending and team defense's ability to stabilize games, rather than the team trying to merely outscore a team in a more chaotic 60 minutes of end-to-end skating. More
on his thoughts regarding the Bryzalov in a minute.
 
Q: Getting back to your back, where are you now compared to where you usually are this time of year? Do you see yourself trying to speed up the process or are you going to take it slower and whenever you get on the ice, you get on the ice?
 
“I’m not going to speed up the process one bit. It’s going to go how it goes.   Normally at this time of year I would have already had 2 months of strength training. I usually start kind of curtailing that a little bit and do more cardio.  Now I have been doing all cardio and no lifting, so it’s kind of a little bit backwards. I need to obviously do a lot of lifting to get my body back to where it needs to be and the shape it needs to be to be able to play an 82 game schedule, and 25-30 minutes a game, the way I play.”

Again, while I wish he were already strength training and all that stuff, it's better that he's not if his body isn't ready. The good news here is that there's no indication he's rushing anything. In a league where nearly every decent team makes the playoffs, it's more important Pronger is healthy in the spring than ready ready in the fall.
 
Q: Realistically when do you think you will be able to be on the ice?
 
“Well I could use the same line I have used a couple times but I won’t. I don’t know. I haven’t started lifting weights yet so I don’t know how my body is going to respond and what kind of strength I am going to have and all the rest of that. Until I get to the gym and start lifting weights I really couldn’t tell you.”
 
Q: Have you been told when you can start lifting weights?
 
“I was told by the hand doctor I could lift in another week, possibly.”
 
Q: Is the lifting weight problem the hand or the back or a combination of both?
 
“No, it would be the hand.”
 
Q: You did say 82 games. Is that a possibility, or a remote possibility, you could be ready on opening day?
 
“Again, I don’t know. The goal is to be ready for Game 1 of the regular season. I am starting to progress.  I think Homer [Paul Holmgren] talked maybe last week about I was in seeing the doctor about a week and a half ago and I was kind of cleared then to progress my cardio and things like that, and grab light weights and do some shoulder work and stuff like that. Once I get cleared, I can start getting into a full lifting program and all the rest of that.  Again, it’s how my body reacts and how I feel that dictates when I start to skate and where we go from there.”
 
And there's the quote that launched a thousand headlines. Many outlets, local and national, picked up the story based on the "Ready for Game 1" goal, but based on everything else Pronger's said here, it's kind of irrelevant at this point. Hell, one sentence before it, he says he doesn't know, and that reality is more important than what his goal is. For most of the call, he indicated that getting back up to speed and strength were the goals. If those happen by game 1, then he'll be out there. If not, I don't see him overextending his rehab to be on the ice on any specific date.

One interesting (though not necessarily pressing) question though is whether the uncertainty as to Pronger's status for the start of the season will affect the captaincy decision, which has yet to be announced despite the roster being fairly well set.

Q: Do you have pain now?
 
“Just sitting here talking to you guys, I have no pain.  Other than my brain.”

Heyyyy there he is.
 
Q: Are you confident the problem has been fixed?
 
“I am. I am, yeah. I hope so. That is the idea when you have these surgeries, that it’ll be fixed for good.  But we do play a physical game and you know, we’ll see, but as I’ve said I am starting to feel a little bit better.  You start rounding the corner, you’re able to ride the bike a little bit harder, you start to feel a little bit better about yourself, and you start get your energy level back and those sorts of things. You start to really kind of push yourself in the gym a little bit more, and as I said, once I start lifting weights I’ll be able to push myself even harder and see how I react and feel.”
 
Q: Could you talk about [Ilya] Bryzgalov a little bit and what he does with the defense especially. Are you excited to play in front of him?
 
“Yeah, I am. I’ve seen him kind of mature over the last five or six years since I was with him in Anaheim, and you know he’s kind of taken his game to the next level, and how he’s played in Phoenix and kind of carried their team to the playoffs. I think we play a very similar defensive style as they did there, very tight defensively, and I’d like to think we play pretty sound defensively as well. I don’t think he’s going to be getting 35-40 shots a night, but you know, 20-25 shots a night.  He is just going to have to stay sharp and stay focused. If he plays the way he did in Phoenix we’ll certainly be pleased.”
 
Except, ya know, better in the playoffs and all that.

Q: How healed up is your hand?
 
“My hand I guess would be about 80% healed, maybe 85% healed. I had the plate removed, so I’m just waiting for the screw holes to fill in.”
 
Q: You seem to be the main recruiter. What do you tell the guys coming on to a new team with so much turnover?
 
“Well, I only talked to one guy. I talked to guys after the trade, so I wouldn’t say I recruited them.  But I speak about the ownership and the management and the coaching staff and about the players that are with the team, and talk about what the coach has been selling, what he’s preaching.  You know, obviously Mr. Snider, what he has done for this team speaks for itself and the moves that Homer’s made, and Lavi’s coaching.  You just talk about the personnel.  [Jaromir] Jagr was over in Europe for the past three years so he hasn’t seen [James] van Riemsdyk or [Claude] Giroux, he hasn’t seen some of these guys.  So you just talk about what type of players they are and about the defense we have and how we play.  He obviously knows Bryz.  Really I was just answering his questions. He was just trying to make up his mind and he had a decision to make and he had a lot of questions to be answered, and I just answered them for him.”
 
Q: Physically how do you feel and how much do you have left in the tank?
 
“Again, I don’t really know that you could say I was breaking down, with broken bones and being hit by pucks and all the rest of that. Those are all the things that can sometimes be avoided.  Perhaps now I may not block as many shots. I may just get out of the way and let our million dollar goaltender stop those things.”

That's a point we made previously as well—having his hand busted up by a shot had nothing to do with Pronger's age. But, the back issue popping up after trying to return to action could very well indicate a durabi
lity issue…
 
Q: I guess I am just asking what your durability is?
 
“Well, if I’m going off of last year I guess I would call myself a band aid.  But I’ve got many other years where you could say I wasn’t a band aid. Sometimes you just have years where things don’t go your way. It was a quick turnaround last year… I played hurt in the playoffs, and had surgery, and was kind of set back in my training, and for whatever reason I had a couple bad breaks along the way and then the back came in. I don’t really know what happened with my back, if it was just a ticking time bomb or what. I don’t think anyone really knows how they hurt their back.  I would like to think I’m past all of this, but again, we’ll see how I react once I start lifting weights and pushing myself a little bit harder.”
 
Q: Did that make it even more important to take your time with this? I am sure you talked to other players who have gone through some things like this and the remedy is to take your time.
 
“Yeah, I think all along I have told Homer, I told Lavi, I told you guys and anyone that’s asked that I’m gonna take my time and make sure I was doing everything that was necessary rehab-wise and what, not whether it be rest or recuperation or whatever it is, to make sure whatever injuries I did have last year were going to be healed up and fully healed and allow me to be healthy whenever it was that I started skating and began playing again, that I was going to be able to go 100% and not look back.”
 
Q: Do you think as much time as you missed last year might have re-energized you?
 
“Sometimes it can. You have to use the time wisely.  For the first little while I couldn’t do anything because of my back, for the first 6 weeks anyway. … everything else to recover as well – where you’re not running the bike, lifting weights, and doing all the rest of the stuff that normally you’re already back doing.  You’re able to allow your body to hopefully fully recover.  I like to think that taking that much time off will allow me to fully heal up and recover and be able to play another 82 game season."

*

To reiterate, despite all of the new questions facing the Flyers, Pronger's health remains one of the most significant. It's probably even more significant with all the new faces in town. Even with all the words pasted above, yesterday's call didn't shed a whole lot of light on the situation, but it could be worse. For now, we'll have to settle for no news being good news. His availability for game 1 really isn't the issue so much as his availability for the majority of the season and especially the postseason. 

Temple basketball names Chris Clark assistant coach

ap-chris-clark.jpg
AP

Temple basketball names Chris Clark assistant coach

Chris Clark is back with the Owls.

The former Temple guard and team video coordinator was named an assistant coach to Fran Dunphy’s staff on Wednesday night.

“We are happy to have Chris Clark rejoin our staff,” Dunphy said in a release by the school. “He knows our system as a player and as a staff member last year. He also has extensive coaching experience, serving as an assistant at three different D-I programs. Chris has been successful at every stop in his career, and we look forward to having him back in the fold.”

Clark, a Philadelphia native, played for the Owls from 2004-08 and was a standout sixth man his senior season, helping lead Temple to a 21-13 record and Atlantic 10 conference championship. During the 2015-16 season, he served the Owls as their video coordinator. He left the program in April to join Drexel’s staff as an assistant.

“I am truly excited to be able to return to Temple as an assistant coach on Fran Dunphy’s staff,” Clark said. “Last season was special working at my alma mater as the video coordinator, but to now serve as an assistant is truly an honor. With that said, I want to thank Drexel head coach Zach Spiker for the opportunity to work on his staff, and his understanding through this process. I enjoyed my short time there and wish the program continued success.”

Jerad Eickhoff pitches well in beating White Sox, but why the quick hook?

Jerad Eickhoff pitches well in beating White Sox, but why the quick hook?

BOX SCORE

CHICAGO — From the season-ending injuries to Aaron Nola and Zach Eflin to the on-the-mound struggles of Vince Velasquez and Jake Thompson, the Phillies have had some unwelcomed issues with their prized young starting pitchers recently.
 
Jerad Eickhoff has been a most pleasant exception.
 
The 26-year-old right-hander delivered six innings of two-run ball in leading the Phillies to a 5-3 win over the Chicago White Sox on Wednesday night (see Instant Replay).
 
Eickhoff came to the Phillies organization in July 2015 as part of the trade that sent Cole Hamels to Texas. He rose to the majors a year ago this week and has now made 34 starts at the game’s highest level. His performance has been pretty encouraging as he has racked up a 3.57 ERA in 206 2/3 innings, basically a full season of work.
 
“He's been the guy who has been the most consistent,” said manager Pete Mackanin, referring to the team’s group of young starters. “He's given us what we wanted. He's had some hiccups, but I expect him to pitch well every time he goes out. I feel confident in him.”
 
At 6-4, 250 pounds, Eickhoff has a workhorse body. He is the only Phillies’ starter to remain healthy this season and the club clearly wants him to stay that way, both for the remainder of the season and the future.
 
That was the explanation that Eickhoff received in the dugout from Mackanin and pitching coach Bob McClure when he was removed from Wednesday night’s game after just six innings. Eickhoff had a 4-2 lead at the time and had thrown just 71 pitches thanks to his cruising through the first five innings on one hit.
 
“A little bit, yeah,” said the pitcher when asked if he was surprised by the quick hook. “But once Mac and Pete made it clear what was going on, it’s a no-brainer. It’s part of the game. I was just happy to get through it and be done and be healthy.
 
“What they said is they want me to make every start this year and be healthy. You can’t complain about that. I’m very lucky and very fortunate to be healthy this year.”
 
So the Phillies are managing Eickhoff's workload. Makes sense with this being a rebuilding season.

But Mackanin had a different explanation for his decision to remove Eickhoff. The pitcher gave up a two-run home run in the sixth inning as his problems in that inning (12.32 ERA as opposed to 2.64 in the first five) continued. Mackanin said he yanked Eickhoff because he wanted to make sure that nothing “snowballed” on the pitcher and he left the game with a good vibe.
 
“He pitched well,” Mackanin said. “I got him out of there after the sixth because I wanted him out on a positive note. He's been struggling in the sixth inning and after that, so I didn't want him going back out there. We have three guys I have confidence in in (Edubray) Ramos, (Hector) Neris and (Jeanmar) Gomez, so it worked out for us.”
 
Mackanin was asked whether the Phillies have Eickhoff on an innings limit. He is up to 155 2/3 innings. He threw 184 1/3 innings last season.
 
“No, no, not at all,” Mackanin said. “I don't know how many pitches he threw. Did he even have 80 pitches? I wanted him out on a positive note. We won, so I guess I made the right move. That's how it works, right?”
 
Ramos, Neris and Gomez protected the lead, though Gomez walked a tightrope and gave up a run in garnering his 34th save.
 
Neris allowed a leadoff walk in the eighth then got three quick outs. Since the All-Star break, he has pitched 18 1/3 innings and given up just one run. He has walked two and struck out 26. Pretty good.
 
After being outscored 18-1 in their previous two games against the White Sox and Cardinals, the Phillies’ bats finally produced some timely hitting. Tommy Joseph had a double, his 17th homer and scored two runs. Aaron Altherr had a pair of RBI singles and scored a run. Freddy Galvis doubled home a run and Cesar Hernandez homered.
 
Joseph’s homer in the top of the sixth against James Shields gave the Phils a 4-0 lead. Eickhoff hasn’t had many of those.
 
“He gets no run support,” Joseph said. “To be able to do that for him is huge.”
 
Eickhoff gave up three hits, including a two-run homer to Dioner Navarro in the bottom of the sixth, but he did limit the damage and got out of the inning with the lead. His handling of adversity in that inning was encouraging but it wasn’t enough to keep him in the game.
 
Mackanin said he wanted Eickhoff to go home with a good feeling.
 
Eickhoff said the team was looking out for his health.
 
Whatever the real reason was, they both made sense in a rebuilding season.

Best of MLB: Jose Fernandez sets K's mark, helps Marlins snap Royals' win streak

Best of MLB: Jose Fernandez sets K's mark, helps Marlins snap Royals' win streak

MIAMI -- Jose Fernandez pitched seven innings and appeared to avoid a serious injury when he tweaked his right leg on his final pitch Wednesday night, helping the Miami Marlins beat Kansas City 3-0 to snap the Royals' nine-game winning streak.

Fernandez (13-7) pulled up after striking out Christian Colon to end the seventh, and rubbed his right knee before limping to the dugout.

The Marlins pinch-hit for him in the bottom of the seventh, and no injury was announced. Fernandez was laughing with teammates in the dugout in the ninth inning and joined in the postgame celebration on the field.

His nine strikeouts increased his season total to 213, breaking the Marlins record of 209 set by Ryan Dempster in 2000. Fernandez ended a career-worst three-game losing streak.

He also had the Marlins' first two hits, hiking his average to .286, and improved to 27-2 at Marlins Park.

Fernando Rodney pitched around two singles and walk for his 25th save and eighth with Miami.

Dillon Gee (5-7) took the loss (see full recap).

Cardinals tag deGrom in win over Mets
ST. LOUIS -- Matt Carpenter, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty homered off Mets starter Jacob deGrom, powering the St. Louis Cardinals past New York 8-1 Wednesday night.

Carpenter set the tone, hitting a leadoff home run in the first inning. The Cardinals went on to win for the seventh time in nine games.

Piscotty and Yadier Molina each had three of the Cardinals' season high-tying 19 hits.

Carlos Martinez (12-7) gave up one run and four hits over eight innings. He also got two hits himself.

Roughed up for the second straight start, deGrom (7-7) allowed five runs on 12 hits in 4 2/3 innings. He was tagged for a career-worst eight runs and 13 hits in his previous outing against San Francisco (see full recap).

Rays overcome Ortiz's 30th HR in comeback win
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- David Ortiz hit his 30th home run in the first inning, but the Tampa Bay Rays came back from a three-run deficit to beat Boston 4-3 in 11 innings Wednesday night and prevent the Red Sox from taking sole possession of first place in the AL East.

Luke Maile doubled with two out in the 11th and scored after Red Sox pitcher Heath Hembree (4-1) dropped a throw to first base on Kevin Kiermaier's grounder.

Brad Boxberger (2-0) got the win after one inning of relief.

Boston has won 10 of its last 13 games and remained tied in first with Toronto after the Blue Jays lost 8-2 to the Angels.

Bidding to become the majors' first 18-game winner, Rick Porcello allowed Evan Longoria's tying homer in the eighth before leaving with 7 2/3 innings pitched. It was Longoria's 30th homer (see full recap).