For Flyers, Hall becoming valuable faceoff ace

For Flyers, Hall becoming valuable faceoff ace

Panaccio breaks down the Flyers' point streak

November 23, 2013, 9:00 am
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Adam Hall has won 63.4 percent of his faceoffs this season. (USA Today Images)

Adam Hall has taken only 101 faceoffs this season.

He’s won 63.4 percent of them -- the best percentage of any player on the Flyers, albeit with far fewer faceoffs taken than either Claude Giroux or Sean Couturier, who each have won 49.7 percent of their draws.

Hall has always been a defensive, fourth-line center and a sure-handed draw in the circle. He says he does extensive video study of the players he might go up against before every game.

The Flyers sometimes use him late in games as a second center in case one gets thrown out of the circle, like they did in the third period against Buffalo on Thursday.

He’s a vital part of the Flyers’ penalty kill, averaging 2:59 shorthanded minutes per game, second only to Couturier (3:03) among the forward group.

“We do all kinds of things,” Hall said of staying sharp on draws. “The coaches dropping pucks for us after practices and pregame skates.

“It’s a skill like anything else. The more you work on it, you get a little bit better, your timing gets better and there’s a lot of different techniques and factors that go into it.

“What works against one centerman may not work against another. You are constantly trying to update other centerman’s tendencies that you are going against. I watch video sometimes. It depends on a situation.

“We talk to each other, even during games if guys are going against the same centerman. You talk about what is working and try to help each other out. Any tiny little thing can help give you an edge.”

Getting your stick down quickly, turning it, moving your body slightly after a draw and knowing who is behind you are all factors of being a good faceoff man.

Bob Clarke, who worked with Giroux on draws when he first came here, would teach players how to cheat and get away with it.

Mike Richards said it took him three years in the league before officials would allow him to cheat like veterans.

“You had to earn it,” Richards once said.

Flyers coach Craig Berube said every one of his centers does homework on their opponent.

“He’s really good at it,” Berube said of Hall. “He’s competitive, real competitive. Players watch more film now than we did.

“He’s done a great job with faceoffs, penalty killing, plays center or wing. He’s a very valuable guy to have on your hockey team. He does everything properly and works hard, blocks shots, all the dirty stuff.” 

Hall scored his first goal in 64 games Tuesday against Ottawa, albeit an empty-netter. He also assisted on Scott Hartnell’s empty-netter Thursday against Buffalo.

The 33-year-old from Kalamazoo, Mich., is not a scorer, though he once tallied 16 goals early in his career when he was with Nashville.

Hall wasn’t brought here to score goals, yet he feels it’s his job to try and add points when he can.

“You try to help any way you can,” Hall said. “You try to play the game consistently away from the puck defensively and make sure you’re consistent in those ways.

“Maybe you’re not relied upon in scoring but if you’re able to help in that department as well, it’s a great feeling.”