Hold Your Horses: Chip Kelly's Debut Exaggerated by Floundering Redskins

Hold Your Horses: Chip Kelly's Debut Exaggerated by Floundering Redskins

One of the pressing questions for the Eagles heading into this season was what if Chip Kelly’s up-tempo offense goes three and out, and their defense had to go back right on the field after they just came off?

New question: what if the Birds’ opponent goes three and out on offense?

The answer is the game in all likelihood will get out of hand quickly.

The overriding theme the day after the Eagles shocked the world* with a 33-27 win over the Washington Redskins on Monday night was football is fun again in Philadelphia. Michael Vick posted three scores – two through the air, one on the ground – LeSean McCoy’s 184 yards rushing were one yard shy of a career high and DeSean Jackson had seven receptions for 104 yards off of nine targets. The night was pretty much a best-case scenario for all of the team’s stars.

The final score even lends the appearance the game was closer than it actually was. A blown call by the officials essentially took seven points from the Eagles and gift-wrapped them for Washington, and Chip might have taken his foot off the gas pedal just a bit too early in the second half.

All’s well that ends well though, now let’s go over that parade route one more time…

Time to pump the brakes a bit on the city’s rekindled love affair with football. As good as the Eagles’ offense looked, as convincingly as the defense took care of business – both of them for the first 32 minutes at least – the Redskins did just as much to play themselves out of the game.

As expected, Washington’s franchise quarterback was not sharp after missing the entire preseason, only eight months removed from a torn ACL. Robert Griffin’s footwork was messed up, the timing with his receivers was off, he wasn’t accurate down the field, and he wasn’t a threat to run at all. And because RG3 couldn’t execute the offense in the first half, the Redskins became one dimensional, allowing the Birds’ defense to tee off on Alfred Morris.

By the time the first half concluded, Washington had managed three first downs, less than 10 minutes in time of possession, plus turned the ball over twice and taken a safety.

So while Philly’s offense proved beyond capable of racking up yards and scoring points in bunches, they also had plenty of opportunities. Not to take away from the job defensive coordinator Bill Davis did with the his unit, but that’s simply not going to happen every week.

This was what you would call a perfect storm. The Redskins clearly weren’t prepared for the onslaught Chip’s version of the three-headed monster was about to unleash, nor the speed at which it would attack. But it turns out the best defense might be an efficient offense, and they certainly didn’t have anything resembling that, either.

Teams that can control the ball and sustain drives are going to make the Eagles work a lot harder than what we saw on Monday. It’s more than the points that did or did not go up on the scoreboard – it’s keeping the ball away from Chip’s offense. It's field position. Not only that, Washington’s defense was continuously on the field practically non-stop until the game eventually got away from them.

Vick and co. are still going to get theirs this season, but it’s a lot easier to jump out to a (would-be) 40-0 lead when the opponent moves the ball about as well as Nichols St.

So what should we make of the Birds’ romp in our nation’s capital? If I had to guess right now, I’d venture Chip Kelly is going to be a successful NFL head coach. The speed at which his offense moves is the fastest the league has ever seen, and that alone is going to ground many a defense into submission.

But after watching the Redskins bumble their way through the first half of that game, I’m even more convinced Griffin wasn’t even close to ready for prime time, and that team will struggle until he shakes off the rust. Sorry to pour cold water on Chip’s epic debut, but there is no way it can be that easy.

* This author wasn't shocked

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.