Holy @!: Phils catcher Lance Parrish Made the '88 All-Star Game

Holy @!: Phils catcher Lance Parrish Made the '88 All-Star Game

You excited for the All-Star Game tonight? You do know that this time it counts, right? Speaking of counting, the folks at the league office have been doing a lot of that recently as they’ve been forced to continually add and subtract players from both rosters.

I am fairly certain that between the injuries, the if-you-pitch-the-Sunday-before-the-All-Star-Game-you're-ineligible-to-pitch rule, and the requirement that all 32 teams send a player to the All-Star Game, Michael Martinez is the only player in baseball who has not been named an All-Star. At last count we were up to 84 All-Stars.

Now, as a Phillies fan, it's great that Roy Halladay is getting the starting nod. We may also get to see Cliff Lee. Placido Polanco and Shane Victorino are out due to injury. Cole Hamels, who pitched on Sunday, is not eligible to pitch. With the best record in baseball, it’s not outrageous that they have five representatives (yes, it’s fair to question Polanco’s inclusion, but the fact remains that he was voted in by the fans).

As a 30+ year old lifelong Phillies fan it’s a bit stunning  to think that five of our guys made the team. That hasn't happened since 1995 (Darren Daulton, Lenny Dykstra, Tyler Green, Mickey Morandini, and Heathcliff Slocumb)*.

(*Update: yes, the Phils had 5 representatives in 2009)

As an aside - I don't think any Phillie pitcher ever arrived in town with a more hyped and vaunted pitch than Tyler Green's knuckle-curve. I can still picture him baffling hitters while rocking that black and gold Wichita State Shockers uniform in the College World Series. Good lord was Tyler Green fun to watch the first half of the 1995 season.

Save for 1999 when Paul Byrd, Mike Lieberthal, and Curt Schilling were All-Stars, the Phillies sent a lone player to the All-Star game every year from 1996-2001.

In looking over the list of Phillies All-Stars, one name caught my eye in a "you've-got-to-be-kidding-me-this-guy-made-an-all-star-team" sort of way.

That name?

Lance Parrish.

In 1988 Parrish, one of the all time Phillie free agent busts, was selected by National League manager Whitey Herzog as a backup to starting catcher Gary Carter.

Parrish entered the break hitting a robust .229. Now, in Herzog's defense Parrish was leading all NL catchers in home runs (12) and RBI's (47) at the midway point.

Kevin Gross was also an All-Star that season, so it wasn't completely a case of Parrish making the team because Herzog had to choose a Phillie. In all likelihood Parrish was selected because he was a catcher with decent power.

Parrish ended up playing just 54 games after the break. His final numbers for the 1988 campaign? He hit .215 with 15 home runs and 60 RBI. He posted a slash line of .215/.239/.370.

Lance Parrish. 1988 National League All-Star.

He was traded that offseason to the Angels in exchange for a 19 year old pitching prospect named David Holdridge. While Holdridge never panned out the Parrish trade opened the door for a young catcher named Darren Daulton to take over the starting catcher duties.

Daulton went on to represent the Phillies in three All-Star Games and helped lead them to the 1993 National League Pennant.

Michal Neuvirth mum on reports of new contract talks with Flyers

Michal Neuvirth mum on reports of new contract talks with Flyers

VOORHEES, N.J. -- As the Flyers try to re-sign goalie Michal Neuvirth on trade deadline day (see report here ), the 28-year-old Czech was both nervous and cautious in talking to the media after Wednesday's practice.

Do you expect to get a deal done?

"I don't know, I don't know," Neuvirth said. "You got to talk to Hexy about that."

Hoping it gets done?

"We'll see."

Neuvirth said he lets his agent, Patrik Stefan, handle everything.

He said he speaks to him every day, but would not elaborate about what was said either last night or today. Neuvirth seemed genuinely fearful of saying anything that would upset Flyers general manager Ron Hextall.

He did say he wants to remain a Flyer.

"Yeah, it's a great group of guys here and I love the city and the organization," Neuvirth said. "I'm gonna try whatever I can to be here."

Asked about the negotiations, Neuvirth said, "I don't know if I can say anything, you have to talk to Hexy about contracts. For me, I am here to stop pucks."

Asked whether Stefan needed assurances that if he were to be re-signed Wednesday, he would not be traded this afternoon to another club before the 3 p.m. deadline, Neuvirth replied, "I have no idea.

"What can I tell you guys? Sorry. I don't want to get in trouble. I don't know what I can say and can't say, so I say nothing."

Q & A with ABC 7 Chicago anchor Dionne Miller

Q & A with ABC 7 Chicago anchor Dionne Miller

Q: What experience has had the biggest impact on your life and career in sports and why?
A:
It’s hard to point to just one experience, I mean I have loved sports for as long as I can remember. Honestly, I cried when John Elway led “The Drive” to beat my Browns! Actual tears!! That was the moment I knew sports meant more to me than just entertainment. As I got older, I realized sports is just like real life… sometimes we succeed, sometimes we fail, but the next day, the next play we all try our best to be a little bit better. This is why I love sports!!

But my plan was never broadcasting. My plan was teaching- English Lit- to high school kids. I think I watched Dead Poets Society a dozen too many times and wanted to see kids standing on desks citing poetry. Clearly, I took a detour! It was actually thru some pretty big real-life struggles in college, and taking a semester off -- that I realized how much I wanted to be a writer --not creative writing but a journalist! I attended a small private liberal arts school that had no professional writing program to speak of, so they sort of created curriculum for me -- what a gift!

On my way to becoming a magazine columnist, I had to fulfill a communications requirement. On a whim, I signed up for TV Broadcasting. One of my first assignments was to report from a “fire” for our faux news cast. I prepared, researched, took my place in front of the “fire” back drop, and the red light went on. Game. Changer. I have no clue what I said, but I remember what I was wearing when I realized what I wanted to do with my life. I left the class, called my parents and immediately added a minor in communications. Though it honestly never crossed my mind to do news. I was already talking about sports, and binge watching ESPN. Sports just made sense. 

Q: Who’s had the biggest impact and why ?  
A:
Because I didn’t attend a journalism school, I graduated knowing precious little about this job I wanted so badly. I was advised to pursue an internship, which I did at WWSB ABC7 in my hometown of Sarasota, Fla. I walked in the first day, wide-eyed and so eager to learn all I could. I had the best teacher in Kevin Neghandi. Kevin was the weekend sports anchor at the time and honestly taught me everything. Everything. 

Shawn McClintock (VP Root Sports Pittsburgh). I met Shawn when I took it upon myself to show up in his news room and interview for a position I wanted. He didn’t hire me, told me to accept a job offer I had in San Diego (which I did) and then told me to keep in touch. Less than a year later, I was let go from my job in California. I had never dreamed I would be fired. Let alone for no other reason than new management wanted someone else. I called Shawn. He not only encouraged me through that time, but led me to the two jobs that would change my life forever.  

He told me he had a college friend who was at a start-up station in Columbus, Ohio and they were looking for a female anchor. Shawn also said he wanted to send my reel to Fox Sports Ohio as he was good friends with the bosses there. Well, that “college friend” not only helped get me hired in Columbus, he became my husband. And after the station we met at folded, Fox Sports Ohio hired me. That job with FSO led me to Big Ten Network, which led me to Chicago and here we are. 

Q: What are some of the funniest moments you’ve experienced as a woman in sports?
A:
When I was hired at FOX 32 in Chicago, they sent a station-wide email welcoming “ Dionne Miller to the Sports Department”… I was told later they all thought I was an African- American man. This cracks me up. 

Q: What was the most negative moment you’ve experienced? The one that got you fired up or perhaps made you think about quitting?
A:
Losing my job sucked! I pride myself on being a team player, I work my butt off, & I did everything I was asked to do and then some. But it wasn’t enough. Still makes me mad! I see now what a gift it was that this happened. I had so many more blessings as a result. And I can truly say it NEVER made me want to quit. It only drove me to push harder. 

And as a woman in sports, I already know I HAVE to push harder. I have to know more, I have to research more, I have to work harder. I can’t make as many mistakes. I am fully aware of this fact and it’s a drag sometimes. But it will never make me want to quit. I know what I signed up for. I pray that one day there is more equality in sports broadcasting -- especially when it comes to pay. But no job is perfect. And I love mine! 

Q: Have you had any teachable moments?  I.e. someone made an ignorant comment, but had no idea you were offended until you said something?
A:
I remember one of my first college football experiences, I interviewed the coach at Montana State University. I asked a question about his failing secondary and he basically answered me like I didn’t know that his team played football. It stuck with me. Especially because the next question came from a male reporter who asked virtually the same thing and got a specific football answer. Annoying. 

Q: Any awkward moments?   
A:
Let’s face it, every time I march into a locker room, it’s awkward.  It just is. Athletes have gotten comfortable with it, and truthfully so have I. We all understand I am there to do a job, but it took some getting used to. I always wonder how I would feel if men came into my bathroom while I’m trying to get dressed or undressed. AWKWARD! But show respect, get respect. That’s kind of how approach it. 

Q: What are you most proud of?
A:
I’m a mom of little people… sometimes I’m most proud that I am awake for work at 10pm, and dressed! Kidding aside I am most proud to be a working wife and mom in a city I can’t believe I get to call home, at a station that gives me the opportunity to do so many amazing things, and continue to sharpen my skills. Six months into my first job in Billings, Montana, I was filming a HS Football game for work. Got tackled and broke my leg in 3 places. Never once during months off the air, rehab and being thousands of miles from home, did I consider quitting. Not once. I am so proud of where I am and my journey to get here. Because it’s MY story. I can’t wait to see what happens next! 

Q: Many girls look up to you. Any advice for those that want to get into sports media? 
A:
 First: NO JOB IS BENEATH YOU! I feel like I need to shout this at young girls wanting to get into the business. Try everything, trust your talents and dive in. If someone offers you an opportunity you think isn’t “ideal”, remember that it could open a door you never imagined if you just go for it. Trust me, you will not be stuck in “Montana." Nothing will last forever and you will not die.

Also, understand what the landscape of the business is. Yes, we will always be outnumbered. Yes we will be judged by our dress, hair, and make up before anyone actually hears the words we say. None of this is a surprise. I’m not saying just accept ignorance. Not at all. But to act like this isn’t happening is ridiculous. It is. And its not just in TV. It happens in every job. 

BE KIND! To your co-workers, your competition and yourself! First of all, you need absolutely everyone in the building you work in to make you look good on the air. DO not take this for granted. Be kind to your competition -- especially other women. Yes, work hard to get your story correct and the best it can be. But do not tear down others on the way. This business is small. Everyone knows everyone. A bad reputation will ruin a stellar resume and incredible on-air talent. Male or female. 

And be kind to yourself. You will make mistakes. You will. I do. It’s ok. It will always be ok. Nothing is ever as bad as you think or as good. Stay humble, but don’t beat yourself up. If you make a mistake, or miss a story, learn, make a change and know you’ll do better next time… there is always another show coming. 

Q: How has social media changed how easily fans can reach out to you? Do you let it bother you?
A:
I have a love/hate relationship with social media. I love it for keeping me connected with what’s going on all over the sports world. But I hate that if I have one slip up on the air, I get immediate comment on twitter. Or if I show personality and it rubs someone the wrong way, I get an email attack. It’s the worst when someone attacks my clothes and hair… um, did you even hear what I said? Yes.. It sucks. And honestly, sometimes it does bother me. But I am working towards letting that stuff go. I have to remind myself that the people who use social media to attack me, don’t know me. I know the men I work with get comments too, so I never feel singled out. I just wish people would pause before they lash out. Social media gives us no reason to filter. People are mean. But we can rise above.