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In-House Notes from Opening Night at the Birds

In-House Notes from Opening Night at the Birds

As Matt P. already detailed the larger narrative of last night's game, we figured we would add in some other notes of interest for those of you who can't get enough football in August.

So fortunate to be in attendance last night, I was able to scrape together these in-house notes without the guiding hand of the broadcast. Maybe Tolly addressed these in detail. Maybe he didn't. Either way, I'm sure he did it with style.

Think of this as a "who was wearing what and how they looked" kind of thread. Oh, and if you're down for the not-so-subtle impact of post-lockout rule changes, you're in the right place. And now here we go with that which was overwhelmingly noticeable from last night's Eagles-Ravens preseason opener…
1. Vince Young's Familiarity with the Offense—An Attempt to Exhaust Ronnie Brown

While Kulp did his best to convince you of Vince Young's overwhelming capability as a quarterback in the NFL yesterday, we would all do well to temper that optimism with the realization that VY remains unfamiliar with the offense today. And, to borrow from Seinfeld, "it's not like there's anything wrong with that." The guy has had only—what?—less than two weeks to learn the offense that has long-been considered one of the complex in football.

With exactly that in mind, coach Andy Reid announced prior to last night's game that the playbook would be scaled down for the opener in the interest of letting some of the new players show off their athletic skills without having to constantly think their way through the process. When asked for his response, Young seemed grateful for the reprieve, mentioning that his goal for the evening was simply "to make sure I get the guys out of the huddle."

Leading the offense for 17 plays, Young would throw just five times, completing three attempts. Through he dropped back on three other occasions, those plays would result in a sack, an intentional grounding penalty and a 6-yard scramble to pick up a first down.

As VY was doing his best Shane-Falco-dance-around-the-throw-up-in-the-huddle ("Look at it this way, it's the first thing they're doing as a team!"), Ronnie Brown was doing his best not to get injured in the preseason. On those 17 plays spearheaded by Young, Brown touched the ball 10 times, finishing with a total of 9 rushes for 22 yards and 1 reception for 7. After touching the ball more than 50% of the time he was on the field, Brown must have felt like he was still a member of the Dolphins.

And though his contributions Thursday night still aren't any indication of his potential usage rate once the season starts, it was nonetheless entertaining to see what he could do. Hopefully, for the sake of LeSean McCoy and the Eagles rushing attack, Brown isn't so overworked in the preseason as to potentially injure himself, his unfortunate shortcoming in years past.

2. "We Re-Signed Brian Westbrook and He Changed His Name? Oh, that's Ronnie Brown"

While it was great to see No. 36 swinging out for a screen pass and making a guy miss on the sideline, it was a little disheartening to realize it wasn't Brian Westbrook.

For fans perhaps opposed to recycling B-West's number so quickly, Philly.com's Sheil Kapadia has authored a piece explaining the necessity of using 36 in the preseason. Bottom line, Brown won't be keeping the number when it comes time for the real Week 1.

"...An Eagles spokesman said the No. 36 is temporary. The Eagles have 90 guys on their roster and seven retired numbers. That doesn't leave many other options open right now."

Kapadia goes on to discuss not only the acceptable use of No. 36, but also numbers 5 and 20. It's a good read about the honoring the past, while nonetheless moving forward. As you'll be able to tell from a quick look at the article's comment section, retiring numbers is an especially divisive issue and—from a fan's perspective—more often based on subjective emotion than any sort of objective metric.

3. Nnamdi as a Red Zone Threat, Just Kidding, But Seriously…

Alright, that cat is huge. Watching Nnamdi line up across from receivers he's as tall, if not taller than is certainly a departure from the days of our once-small secondary.

Having not seen much of Asomugha's career on the west coast, it's absolutely no wonder that he's become as dominant as he has with that combination of height, speed and athleticism. I know we didn't sign Plax, but maybe Vick can start throwing jump balls to Nnamdi. Just a thought. Not for real. But maybe…

Oh, and while we're discussing new cornerbacks and old jersey numbers, Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie took the field last night in what was once-Troy Vincent's No. 23. Is it a big deal? No. But do we notice these things? Yeah. (Note: The Eagles are advertising DRC jerseys with the No. 45 in their game day programs, so he too may be in line for a jersey change.)

4. Post-Lockout Rule Changes [In two parts labeled "A" and "B"]

Separate from the doling out of $9 trillion dollars and making sure retired players receive the healthcare they so deserve, there were a few rule changes attached to the return of football. Two of those adjustments proved evident Thursday night, leaving some fans, and even Andy Reid, at least a little confused.

A. Kick-offs Now Take Place from 35, Hope You Weren't a Fan of the Return Game

Seeing as how I got a beer, went to the bathroom once or twice and left with seven minutes to go in the fourth quarter, this stat may not be exact, but I did not once see a kick brought back out of the end zone.

In the interest of making the game safer and its players less susceptible to injury, kick-offs have been moved forward, resulting in less of an opportunity to return the football. One needs only to think of Ellis Hobbs' special teams incident last year to understand at least some of the motivation behind the move.

Still, at no point did you ever think "this guy is going to take off."

Following the USA-Mexico soccer game Wednesday night, the touch lines were still visible on the field's surface. Colored over in black so as not to be distracting, though still noticeable, Wednesday's end-line provided an especially interesting perspective on the new return game, as it worked to effectively bisect the end zone. With the benefit of that added perspective, it was easy to see that nearly every kickoff landed in the last five yards of those end zones. Some kicks sailed out the back entirely.

Granted, the wind will work to change some of the dynamic as the season progresses, but return game figures to become far less of a factor in football given the new rules, an obviously difficult realization for specialists like Devin Hester and Leon Washington. Already voicing opposition to the change, Cleveland Browns returner Josh Cribbs tweeted:

 “I see an immediate amendment on the kickoff rule either b4 the end of the year or beginning of next year bc without that part of the return game it might as well be a scrimmage....”

After watching exactly what you did at the Linc Thursday night, Ravens coach John Harbaugh was similarly moved to comment: “To me, it will swing the balance of the play dramatically to the kickoff team.”

Even with all that in mind, another trip to Cribbs' Twitter page will reveal his celebration of a 103-yard return during the third quarter of last night's San Diego Chargers-Seattle Seahawks game.

B. "Marty, Should We Challenge?" "They're Already Reviewing it, Andy." "Oh, Really?!"

What would have potentially been a Mike-Kafka fumble returned for a touchdown during the third quarter was called back after an official review.

Looking up at the video screen and walking the length of the sideline toward the north end zone, Andy repeatedly reached for the red flag dangling from his pocket. Though he never pulled it out, his gestures indicated that he was certainly considering it.

What those in attendance later came to realize was that the officials had already overturned the play themselves. While I couldn't see if anyone actually went under the tent, or if the referees just huddled to get the call right, this was the first instance in which the new replay rules may or may not have come into effect.

In short, all scoring plays are now reviewable without a coach having to weigh the benefit of objecting to a play versus the risk of losing a timeout. So, for those of you who cringe every time Andy has one of these decisions to make, you can all take some comfort. At least some of the responsibility, some of the time, has been taken out of his hands.

Regardless of whether or not video reviewed was used—again, I couldn't really tell—the Kafka-not-fumble did expose one of the new rule's coolest wrinkles. What if Raven running toward the end zone had the presence of mind to purposefully step out of bounds just before reaching the goal line?

Granted, he would have to be more than confident in his offense's ability to convert from the one-yard-line, but since it wasn't a scoring play, the turn of events would have forced Reid to potentially gamble a timeout without the benefit of an automatic review. There is a Brian-Westbrook-lays-down-at-the-one-to-keep-the-clock-moving moment in some bright athlete's future if he is smart enough to realize it.

Like the new rules? Hate em? Think Nnamdi should be on the field every play, offense and defense (still kidding, maybe)? Want more, less of Ronnie Brown? Predisposed to hate DRC out of love for Troy Vincent? See you in the comments.

CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

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CSNPhilly Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

NFL Notes: Aaron Hernandez had severe CTE; daughter sues NFL, Patriots

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NFL Notes: Aaron Hernandez had severe CTE; daughter sues NFL, Patriots

BOSTON -- Former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez had a severe case of the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, his lawyer said on Thursday in announcing a lawsuit against the NFL and the team for hiding the true dangers of the sport.

Dr. Ann McKee, the director of the CTE Center at Boston University, said Hernandez had Stage 3 (out of 4) of the disease, which can cause violent mood swings, depression and other cognitive disorders.

"We're told it was the most severe case they had ever seen for someone of Aaron's age," attorney Jose Baez said.

Hernandez killed himself in April in the prison cell where he was serving a life-without-parole sentence for murder. Baez said Hernandez had shown signs of memory loss, impulsivity and aggression that could be attributed to CTE (see full story).

Jets: Williams limited with bone bruise in wrist
FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- New York Jets defensive lineman Leonard Williams was limited at practice with a wrist injury that he says is a bone bruise.

Williams was originally injured during the preseason, and says Thursday that his wrist is bothering him at times. It doesn't appear that the injury will keep him out of the Jets' home opener Sunday against Miami, but Williams might have to play through it.

Defensive lineman Muhammad Wilkerson sat out practice for the second straight day with a sore shoulder. He said Wednesday that it wasn't a big deal, and coach Todd Bowles says the Jets will see how it feels as the week goes along.

Starting right guard Brian Winters (abdomen) and tight ends Jordan Leggett (knee) and Eric Tomlinson (elbow) also didn't practice. Fourth-year backup Dakota Dozier would start if Winters is unable to play (see full story).

Packers: Perry latest key player to go down with injury
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The banged-up Green Bay Packers have lost another key player to injury with outside linebacker Nick Perry scheduled to have hand surgery.

Coach Mike McCarthy says he doesn't know how much time Perry will miss. He was off to a good start as the bookend to fellow edge rusher Clay Matthews with 1 sacks.

The Packers' first-round draft pick in 2012, Perry had a breakout 2016 last season with 11 sacks in 14 games.

The loss of Perry places added importance on the return of Ahmad Brooks, who was a full participant in practice on Wednesday after missing the Week 2 loss at Atlanta because of a concussion (see full story).

Broncos: Miller baffled by low hit from Cowboys receiver
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -- Von Miller says he's baffled by Cowboys wide receiver Noah Brown's low hit on him Sunday.

The Broncos linebacker pushed through Brown's block on the game's second snap and Brown got up and dived at Miller's knees as Denver's star chased down Ezekiel Elliott on a hand-off from Dak Prescott.

Miller shook off the hit to have a monster game in Denver's 42-17 win , but he has dealt with soreness in his left knee this week.

"My stance is as a player I've always tried to take care of my players on my football team and opponents as well, whether it's the quarterbacks, receivers, the running backs. So, when it's the other way around, it's just baffling," Miller said Thursday after returning to practice full-time following a limited practice Wednesday.

"But you can't really spend too much time on it," Miller added. "Everybody's situation in the National Football League is different. Everybody doesn't have the same outlook that I have and some of my comrades in the National Football League (have). Everybody doesn't see it that way. Everybody doesn't play the game like I play the game. You've got to respect that."

Earlier in the week, Broncos coach Vance Joseph declined to criticize the Cowboys wide receiver for his low hit, saying, "I saw it. It wasn't called. I'm OK with it."

Miller shook off the low hit and finished the afternoon with two sacks, five quarterback hits, two tackles for loss and a pass breakup.