Howie Gets Some Help: Tom Gamble Named Eagles VP of Player Personnel

Howie Gets Some Help: Tom Gamble Named Eagles VP of Player Personnel

Those concerned Howie Roseman is in way over in his head as
Eagles’ general manager and decider – all of us really, to some extent anyway –
should breathe a sigh of relief today.

The league’s youngest GM added a veteran “football guy” to
the front office on Wednesday in Tom Gamble, naming him to the post of vice president
of player personnel. Gamble will assist in every aspect of personnel, including
both pro and college scouting.

Bringing 24 years of NFL experience to Philadelphia, Gamble spent
the previous nine with the San Francisco 49ers, serving the last two as their
director of pro personnel. He helped rebuild the organization from a disastrous
2-14 season in 2004 into Super Bowl contenders the past two seasons.

Interesting nugget from his bio: Gamble’s career actually
began with the Eagles in 1988 as an assistant in their player personnel
department. His father Harry was formerly the team president, and also at one
time the head coach at Penn.

Say what you want about Roseman, but he obviously believes
in the age-old mantra there’s no substitute for good help. This should ease
some of the worries that Howie would be going it alone and was wielding too
much power of the front office.

Or maybe not. Does the addition of Gamble provide any
comfort to skeptical fan base?

>> Eagles name Tom Gamble as VP of player personnel [CSN]

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Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Phillies

Are we there yet? Philly Sports Talk examines the state of the Phillies

All week on Philly Sports Talk on CSN, we examine how our teams got to this point and where they are in the rebuilding process. 

Today, we take a look at the Phillies.

How did we get here?
The Phillies pretty clearly got here by holding onto the 2008 championship core several years too long, but they've also arrived at this point because of an inability to develop difference-making talent.

The Phils have some pieces, but they don't have a star or two to expedite the rebuild, nor do they have multiple solid, complete players like the Royals did.

Maikel Franco is a piece. Odubel Herrera is a piece. Aaron Altherr is a piece. But are any of them going to make multiple All-Star teams? Will any of them bat .300 or hit 30 homers in the middle of the order for a playoff team?

That's the big problem right now. Aaron Nola and Jerad Eickhoff are valuable pitchers to have, but you're not going to make the playoffs if they're two of your top five players.

This season, 2017, was supposed to be the year the Phillies inched closer to .500. Pete Mackanin went out on a limb before the season saying he thought they could get there. Right now, they're on pace to win 58 games.

However, the thing to remember here is that teams don't necessarily improve in a straight line, going from 63 wins to 71 to 80 to 85 to 90-plus.

The 2014-15 Cubs jumped from 73 wins to 97.

The 2012-13 Pirates went from 79 to 94.

The 2012-13 Royals increased from 72 to 86.

So it can change in a year with the right mix of development, spending and luck. The Phillies have money to spend. Development and luck just haven't been on their side the last five years.

Are the Phillies on the right path back to prosperity?
It doesn't seem so, but the right things are happening below the major-league level. 

They're happening with first baseman Rhys Hoskins and catcher Jorge Alfaro, who could be batting fourth and fifth next opening day.

They're happening with Dylan Cozens, who looks like he'll provide 30-plus home run power, even if it might come with a .220 batting average and a ton of strikeouts.

And they're happening at the lower levels, where pitchers Sixto Sanchez and Seranthony Dominguez, outfielder Mickey Moniak and second baseman Scott Kingery all have an upside ranging from "very good" to "star."

The question is just: How much more of this waiting can Phillies fans take? That 2018 free-agent class is fun to think about, but it also means waiting out one more season with a team in the bottom 10 in terms of true talent.

Shortening overtime in the NFL is stupid

Shortening overtime in the NFL is stupid

Like when sporting events finish in a tie? Of course you do. That’s why the NHL scrapped ties in favor of a skills competition back in 2005, or why Major League Baseball awarded home-field advantage in the World Series to the winning side of an exhibition game for 14 years. Yeah, folks love ties.

Well, if you’re the type who enjoys a good tie or a long smooch with your sister, the NFL has a rule change made just for you. Because the end result of reducing overtime from 15 minutes to 10 during the regular season will inevitably be more contests that end without deciding a winner.

Why? The league offered some hollow-sounding excuse built around player safety and competitive balance. Teams that play an additional five minutes in the extra period, then turn around and play again on a short week -- think Monday to Sunday, or worse, Sunday to Thursday -- are at a disadvantage, while the health of the players are at greater risk.

Whether there was any tangible evidence five more minutes can really have a serious effect on the following week is unclear. It sure doesn’t seem like that would make a world of difference. The only thing we can say for certain is the end result will be more ties.

Even under the previous rule, the NFL managed to have two games end in ties in 2016, which are two more than anybody would prefer. Yet, four more games went deeper than 10 minutes into overtime, according to Jonathan Jones for Sports Illustrated, and while not all were necessarily guaranteed to finish in a tie under the change, the likelihood obviously increases.

For the sake of argument, let’s just say there were two more ties in ’16, bringing the total to four. That still isn’t a huge number, but even two is atypical. Most years, there are one, or none at all. Now, the frequency is guaranteed to increase.

Does that matter? Maybe not. A few extra ties are unlikely to turn off viewers. In fact, a case can be made overtime will be more exciting with the clock coming into play more often. Ties also lead to some interesting situations in the standings, and can inject slightly more intrigue into playoff races late in the year.

None of which is going to change the fact that ties are inherently a bad thing and people despise them. The NHL and MLB both came up with rule changes that would avoid ties, each of which had a major impact on the very landscape of the sports. Yet, while competitors are getting away from ties, the NFL has decided to invite more.

Again, it’s worth pointing out the reasoning seems bogus. If competitive balance and player safety are issues, teams wouldn’t have to turn around and play on Thursday four days after a Sunday game in the first place.

The NFL’s overtime rules were already imperfect. Shortening the length of the period is unlikely to fix inherent problems with the sudden-death system -- namely a team winning the game on the possession immediately following the coin flip. Instead, we simply have another round of valid complaints to look forward to on the horizon.